Cam McRae, crippler Trail, Kaz Yamamura
Poor Prep Will Bite you in the Ass

A Disgrace to Mountain Biking

Words Cam McRae
Photos Cam McRae
Date Sep 17, 2018

The ride began with a hiccup. His still mounted pedals led me to believe my Bronson tester had been ridden by Pete on the weekend and it wasn’t getting into the 50t cog. On some days that would be NBD but Trevor and I were starting our ride with No Quarter. The climbing trail on Mt. Fromme is indeed unrelenting and I needed that dinner plate-sized cog. After a twist of the barrel adjuster, it seemed to work, and then it didn’t.

I used to carry spare glasses in my pack but after becoming a bum bag-wearer I slimmed down. Finding the low limit screw proved impossible for this Magoo.* In fact I couldn’t find any limit screws without my spectacles. Luckily T-Bone is similarly disadvantaged by aging retinas and he passed me the old man lenses that live in his SWAT compartment. I twisted the hidden limiter appropriately and we were again on our way.

*Mr Magoo was actually near sighted

worn.original.jpg

Switching to Camelbak's Repack bum bag from a full size pack led me to slim down on tools and spares. It seems I pushed it too far.

In the early days of the North Shore disastrous rides were common. Wheels became tacos, V-brake pads wore through sidewalls or even the braking surface, Marzocchi Z1 steerers sheared, limbs were broken; adventure was always at hand and walking out wasn’t rare. Bikes are getting so good I can’t  remember the last time I walked out with a mechanical. This relative security had me betray my inner boy scout. No preparation badge for me.

Pro Tool Mini

A multi-tool can be the foundation for your off road emergency kit - but even the best will only get you so far. I've been trying out  this PRO (Shimano's parts and accessory brand) Mini Tool 22 and it's very good. 

We emerged from the climber and pedalled up the fireroad to 7th Secret. This trail used to be a favourite and then it became, in my view, over-paved with stone. Armouring with rock is a great way to preserve the trail surface, and it’s not bad in the dry, but I’m a fan of soil. Recently however dirt has started to return and many of the corners have been bermed slightly, mostly thanks to Peter Morin, the unstoppable 76-year old who’s been building trails on Mt. Fromme since many of you were in diapers. If you see an older gentleman riding a hardtail with bar-ends and custom-made brake extenders (he actually rides down on barends) give him a high five.

Chain Tool Pro

I needed the chain tool on a ride with my son and the PRO Mini 22 was up to the job. 

Thanks to Peter, 7th is better than it’s been since the loam was deep. It also may be the best wet weather trail on the Shore, and it was soggy after the morning’s deluge. Emerging from 7th we were jonesin’ for something less refined and settled on Crippler. The trail once had a secret entrance off more popular Grannies and while it’s now on the maps, traffic seems to have decreased since then. I figured we’d probably be the only ones down it on a Wednesday. Trails benefit from a knobby break and Crippler has re-loamed itself some. It’s still tight and technical in places but the challenges are pleasing ones.

At the bottom of the longest steepest chute on the trail I heard a telltale hiss. Air was escaping fast. I fumbled around but finally got the leaky side down and hoped the sealant would do its job for once. It seemed to be slowing and, as I was deciding whether I should use a CO2 cartridge, Trevor realized he’d also punctured. His course of action was straightforward because the lazy ass had a tube in the rear from a previous incident. I decided I could limp on with reduced pressure because of the 2.6” Minions on the Bronson, so while he swapped tubes I went to investigate whether our simultaneous flats had been caused by some misguided trail warrior.

luca_fromme.jpg

This is Leppard, which is below 7th Secret but also Peter Morin's responsibility. Rider - Luca McRae

I found a single sharp rock that was likely the villain but when I returned my tire was too deflated to continue. Trevor had swapped his tube and inflated it to discover that his ultra-light spare had been compromised while living in the SWAT cavity of the Specialized. This left his CO2 cartridge spent. I gave him my tube and he went to work while I broke out a cartridge to inflate my sagging Minion. I hate disposables and I only begrudgingly began to carry cartridges recently so I was surprised to successfully cram some greenhouse volume into my rear tire. The increased pressure blew sealant out of the hole but I hoped there would be enough pressure to get me out. Unfortunately removing the cartridge pulled out my valve core and I lost significantly more volume than I’d added. I’d installed the tires so that screw up was on me. 

Raceface Tool Stach

I wasn't happy with how securely the Raceface Stash Tool Wrap was holding on. As it turns out I have it wrapped incorrectly. I only have a tube in there because I often have a test bike and a personal bike on the go at a time and I need to make sure I have what I need with me. The wrap can also mount under your saddle. 

Then I remembered Trevor had a pump. A $15 model he had picked up at MEC here in North Van. I dug around in my pack blindly, eventually found and used the core tightener I’d hoped was there, and then attached his pump. Pumps need to get air into their own chamber so hearing a hissing sound isn’t unusual, unless it happens when you are compressing the pump and that hiss is coming out of the wrong end. The cheap-ass pump had a leak*. I did my best to reduce the hiss with positioning and tried 100 strokes. Nada.

*MEC carries many good quality pumps as well and the one Trevor bought no longer seems to be stocked

lezyne.jpg

This Lezyne Gauge Drive HV is small and light (117g) and it includes a gauge. That's great but speed and volume were even more important to me. I auditioned this pump by putting 50 strokes into this tube. It actually pushes pretty good volume. 

oneup.jpg

OneUp's EDC pump is slightly plumper (both in width and weight at a still reasonable 156g) but this is what the same tube looked like after only 20 strokes. With high volume tires becoming more common, pushing lots of air is critical. 

At this point we had one cartridge between us, a faulty pump and two deflated tires - including one that still seemed to be leaking. I had a 25g cartridge so maybe we could both inflate with it? I had little confidence in that course so I tried the pump again, with similarly shitty results. These two experienced mountain bikers, with 60 years combined experience, were a bloody mess. 

I heard a noise behind us and turned to look. I saw nothing and assumed it was a rider on a nearby trail, since nobody rides Crippler. And then young Tomáš appeared, stylishly aired out the move behind us and said an unsmiling but pleasant, “hello.” We chatted politely for a moment, patiently waiting to ask; “You don’t happen to have a pump?” My hopes were low. It seems that most riders these days come even less prepared than we had. Tomáš’ deadpan reply was “10 bucks?” He didn’t seem to be kidding but we laughed and he dug out his pump.

edc_tool.jpg

The EDC 100CC pump is cleverly designed to house OneUp's EDC tool, for those who aren't keen on putting it in the head tube. You can either put the stash container on the bottom or thread in a 16g CO2 cartridge. This can all be clipped to your bike using the bottle cage-mounted bracket.

edc_pump_adapter.jpg

More cleverness. The pump head doubles as a CO2 inflater. Just unthread from the pump and thread it onto the cartridge and you are GTG. One less thing to carry. 

edc_pump_co2.jpg

Easy peasy.  The EDC pump is so good that on my last ride I actually over-inflated a tire. 

We’d just illustrated the wisdom of carrying a crappy pump. I used to carry a Lezyne micro-drive, which is a like a mini floor pump that isn’t too bulky unless you wear only a bum bag. Tomáš had a pump that was similar but even bigger and it easily inflated Trevor’s tire. Once he was done I asked if I could use it as well. Tomáš pulled out his stock reply; “10 bucks?” We laughed and again hoped he was joking.

Once inflated we bullshitted a little more and discovered young Mr. 10 bucks was from the Czech Republic. Tomáš told us he moved here 4 years ago, “for the riding of course,” as if moving to Canada for any other reason would be absurd. Trevor offered to compensate him by showing our route down the mountain and he got in line. We managed to reveal a few new connectors for him and pounded knuckles at the bottom before parting ways.

Once home my tire had healed itself and I decided to trust the goop, but there was more work to be done. I strapped a new tube to my seat mast and added a tidy OneUp EDC pump to my fanny (after testing its function). Along with going back to carrying a pump, I’m going to add a patch kit* (which can be used on tires in some cases), an old pair of glasses (your time will come) and some duct tape wrapped around the pump. Before this my survival kit had been reduced to 4 zip ties, the core tightener, a multi-tool, two CO2 cartridges, 5(!) tire levers (including the one on my multi tool) and the tube strapped to my bike. I used to have a 12-spd quick link but I used it on my son’s 10-spd chain (it worked perfectly) and forgot to replace it so that’s going back in as well.

*glueless patches almost always fail - sooner or later - while vulcanizing patches are permanent when properly applied

complete_kit.jpg

My updated but still streamlined kit clockwise from top left: multi tool, EDC pump, four zip ties (which could live inside the pump along with the tire levers), a 25g CO2 cartridge, Silca Tire Levers Premio with neoprene sleeve (aluminum on one side for stiffness and nylon on the other to protect your rim and distribute load), valve core tool, quick link, spare valve core and zip lock to keep things organized and easily found. Not pictured; old man glasses, Gorilla tape wrapped around pump, patch kit with vulcanizing patches and two tubes of glue and frame-mounted tube. I may add a few first aid items later. 

Travelling light is great and ditching a pack has been a leap forward for my riding, but Tomáš’ arrival was a dumb luck. Redundancy is challenging with limited stash volume, but it's essential if you want to end your rides on rubber. Mountain biking has always been about self reliance and back country ingenuity. What is more satisfying than saving a ride with some outlandish solution thanks to the right preparation?T his boy scout is again sorted for local adventures (I think) but there is always more to learn.

Let me know what you'd add (or delete). 

Comments

RAHrider
+2 Kevin26 Cam McRae
Reed Holden  - Sept. 16, 2018, 11:32 p.m.

The EDC set up is amazing - I've been singing it's praises for a while. You need to ditch the multi-tool and get the EDC one that goes inside, it will also store your spare link. Also, you can fit a CO2 inside as well. Finally, you need to get a plug kit. I have a blackburn one as well as the EDC one. I suspect the Dynaplug is better than both but I like the EDC one better than the blackburn.

Your entire situation would have been fixed with a plug kit. I don't get the people who ride with only CO2. I only started using it this year and the two times I tried were failures. First one was a valve issue and the second time it turned out I had two holes not one. Pump is essential!

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 Kevin26
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:38 a.m.

I have ridden with the EDC tool in my steerer Reed, and it's awesome, but I prefer something that is more quickly deployed and stashed. So it's a multi tool either in my pocket or the sleeve in my bum bag for me. Plug kit I haven't yet ridden with but it's been on my list of things to try. Thanks for the tips!

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danielshiels
+3 Metacomet Kevin26 Cam McRae
danielshiels  - Sept. 17, 2018, 12:54 a.m.

Plug kit for sure, I ride in rock infested Wales often enough to carry a mech hanger as well. Also a spare cable and a leatherman tool for the pliers and knife blade and finally an old Muc off lube bottle full of sealant that conveniently fits perfectly into the valve stem

Reply

fartymarty
+2 Kevin26 Cam McRae
fartymarty  - Sept. 17, 2018, 2:10 a.m.

I also carry a 60ml bottle of Stans in my hip pack. The last time I flatted I didn't have enough sealant to seal the hole. The extra 60ml did the trick.

Also I ride schrader split tube tubeless so carry a valve core remover, spare tube (schrader), pump, anchovies and C02 (generally 2 on the bike).  

I also have KMC chain breaker / tyre levers, tick twister (in case you pick up one of the nasty little buggers), 2 little tubes of super glue (useful for everything including gluing skin back together), power link, small power bank for phone, spare AAAs for blinky light and sometimes £10 (but usually not as I just spent it).

On longer rides (> than 3 hours when I carry a pack) I will take a small first aid kit, loo paper, nappy bags and baby wipes...

Edit - I have one of those emergency mech hangers as well but have a steel HT with horizontal dropouts so can always single speed if necessary or hit the bend one with a very big rock.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+1 Kevin26
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 17, 2018, 6:28 a.m.

Okay, you got me. What are the anchovies for? 🙂

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fartymarty
+4 Endur-Bro Cr4w Kevin26 Cam McRae
fartymarty  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:02 a.m.

Tyre plugs, or anchovies (as they are sometimes called here) altho a small tin of proper anchovies wouldn't go a miss.

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craw
+3 Merwinn Cam McRae AJ Barlas
Cr4w  - Sept. 17, 2018, 9:11 a.m.

In Canada we call them bacon strips.

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AJ_Barlas
0
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 17, 2018, 10:17 a.m.

This. Thanks for clarifying Marty. You learn something new every day!

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Kevin26
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:42 a.m.

I used to travel more like you FM, and I always have my wallet with me, but I'm liking the slimmed down approach right now. The super glue is a solid idea

Reply

sospeedy
+1 Cam McRae
sospeedy  - Sept. 18, 2018, 4:16 a.m.

Watch those little bottles of Stan’s... I, too, carried one. Finally, in a moment of need, I pulled out the bottle, gave it a good shake, and opened it up to find...a white congealed mass of latex, with only a bit of watery liquid left. Seems these things might have a limited shelf life!

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fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Sept. 18, 2018, 1:03 p.m.

Good call, I usually top mine up from a big bottle.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 Kevin26
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:39 a.m.

Nice additions. I used to use a multi tool with a bade and I certainly miss that. I may just add a small knife or some sort.

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AJ_Barlas
+2 Kevin26 Cam McRae
AJ Barlas  - Sept. 17, 2018, 6:46 a.m.

Sounds like a horror show mate. Hopefully, you were both laughing about it at the bottom with brews in hand. 

I’ve been carrying a OneUp EDC with a Dynaplug kit thrown in the bottom, replacing the EDC capsule. Like you, I feel bad using disposable Co2 and figure the pump works well enough. Unless racing, a decent pump is fine. A tube is strapped to the bike too. Funny enough, the first ride after updating to this setup, I blew a tire. Got lucky!

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Mbcracken
+1 Kevin26
Mbcracken  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:09 a.m.

While riding the Enchilada in Moab...we came across a guy that put a sizable slash in his tire.  Nothing that a wrapper and tube couldn't fix and get him out.  The problem was the locking nut on his tubeless valve was so tight it would not move with our fingers. Thus could not put a tube in... I've since thrown in a small micro Leatherman that has a small plier on the end to get those nuts off.

Cheers, Mike

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cam@nsmb.com
+2 Mbcracken Kevin26
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 7:45 a.m.

Nice one Mike. Pliers are one of the best additions to get you out of all sorts of jams, particularly with valves. I've had them become completely jammed in the rim with old fluid, even after the ring was removed, and pliers were the only thing that saved us. I had to rip it right out the top because it wouldn't move at all the other way.

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DanL
+2 Cam McRae Mbcracken
DanL  - Sept. 17, 2018, 12:45 p.m.

if you don't want to shell out for a leatherman, the Gerber Dime is a good mini alternative

Reply

JBV
+1 Kevin26
James Vasilyev  - Sept. 17, 2018, 8:14 a.m.

hip packs are great, i use one, but the compromise from a pack can be a real PITA. crappy micro pumps, ultralight and compact everything can leave you in the lurch. if you have 2 bikes with different rim specs, make sure the tube you carry fits both and has a long enough valve stem for the deepest rim. i could go on and on, but i'm frustrated with my own bad experiences this summer with flatting. tubeless set ups, not as flat proof as i once experienced.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 10:27 a.m.

Valve stem length is a solid reminder. One thing I have tossed in previously is a stem extender so that will never been an issue in a pinch.

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Sept. 19, 2018, 8:27 a.m.

I forgot to mention, there is only one size you need to carry; 29. Check out this trick from Eric Porter via Andrew Major. It works great. 

https://nsmb.com/articles/eric-porters-universal-tube-trick/

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
0
Tjaard Breeuwer  - Sept. 19, 2018, 10:14 a.m.

I don’t see the issue with fanny packs. In fact, the only reason I carry a pack of any kind is for clothing or large first aid kits on long or remote rides. The spares and tools go on the bike: more comfortable, safer and less likely to be forgotten.

On my bike I carry a Birzman mini pump: It has a hose to prevent snapping valve-stems off, and pushes on/pulls off, to prevent unscrewing valve cores.

Underneath the saddle in a Specialized Bandit I have a tube, in a nylon bag to protect it from wear, tire levers and CO2 inflator(again push on) and cartridge.

A mini tool, derailleur hanger, Zipties, quicklink, brakepads and tubeless fixkit all fit in a top tube bag or tiny wallet in a pocket.

Reply

Kevin26
+2 Tjaard Breeuwer Andrew Major
Kevin26  - Sept. 17, 2018, 8:30 a.m.

No derailleur hangar? Mine is zip tied and taped to my seat rail, can barely even see it but nice that it's there, and I'm never going to forget it

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 10:32 a.m.

Strong one Mike. Since I'm often testing bikes I'd have to track down the correct hanger several times a year. Attaching it to the bike is a great idea though. I used to always carry one (or more) when I rode the same bike every ride, but I haven't broken one in over ten years. In fact I can't remember the last time I was on a ride when someone snapped one. Hangers are much more robust than they used to be in my experience. Have you busted one recently?

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shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - Sept. 17, 2018, 11:20 a.m.

Had friends on a recent ride where they busted 2 of them.  Was a good reminder for those who didnt carry one for their bike to go and get one ASAP.  Im not sure I want a more 'robust' hanger?  The whole idea of the hanger is to save your frame/derailleur from getting completely mangled. If you make them too strong and they dont snap, then they are really doing their job.  I think the 'shadow' part of the new derailleurs plays a part, in that they dont stick out as far, but the cages do seem to drag a lot lower.

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Kevin26
+1 Cam McRae
Kevin26  - Sept. 17, 2018, 4:02 p.m.

Seen 2 broken hangars in the past year, not a lot but having one would save you from having to coast wherever you are.

Reply

cooperquinn
0 Niels Kelownakona
Cooper Quinn  - Sept. 17, 2018, 11:33 a.m.

Another vote for "I don't get the advantage of carrying CO2 unless you're racing" 

I'm a pump guy. Dynaplug kit, tube, pump. No patches, unless I'm going somewhere deep, in which case the whole loadout changes significantly.

Reply

earleb
0 Cooper Quinn Kelownakona
earle.b  - Sept. 17, 2018, 1:01 p.m.

Another nother vote for ditch the disposable C02.

Reply

xy9ine
+1 ZigaK
Perry Schebel  - Sept. 17, 2018, 1:59 p.m.

another vote for carrying nothing other than a phone & car key! who's with me? hello?

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Heyratch19
0
B Ratch  - Sept. 17, 2018, 3:52 p.m.

I'm with you man

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fartymarty
0
fartymarty  - Sept. 18, 2018, 1:08 p.m.

I do have times when i'm with you on that one, but only on a solo ride and you have to be prepared to walk home.

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cam@nsmb.com
+1 keenconn11
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 2:07 p.m.

I hear you. Disposable stuff sucks. 

But what if you need to seat a tire? I guess the tube will work but if you just burped and then lost your bead seat a CO2 is useful. The biggest advantage is not having to carry a pump, for those so inclined, and speed can sometimes be critical even when you aren't racing. 

Another solution is to ride Cushcore and just ride it out.

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sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - Sept. 18, 2018, 2:25 a.m.

Stans Rims, Tape, Sealant, & Maxxis Exo tires = No problemo w/ a hand pump!

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Kelownakona
+1 Velocipedestrian
Kelownakona  - Sept. 17, 2018, 1:57 p.m.

Feel like a Luddite but I still run tubes. So I just carry a spare tube/pump and self-adhesive patches just in case. 

I know I can always fix a flat this way and cannot be arsed with sealant, plugs etc

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Sept. 17, 2018, 2:10 p.m.

If you don't have any flat problems and are happy with the pressure you are able to run and feel of your tires, there isn't much advantage to tubeless. I rarely flat with tubeless but I've been a bit cursed for the last few months and I've had five since April. Only one was a fast leak that needed immediate attention and the others were seepers that slowly lost air.

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velocipedestrian
0
Velocipedestrian  - Sept. 17, 2018, 5:26 p.m.

http://www.vorb.org.nz/favourite-bits-friday-dakine-nomad-hydration-pack-t127269-30.html

(image doesn't want to be uploaded for some reason) 

Plus a silver survival blanket since I took this picture.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+1 Cam McRae
Velocipedestrian  - Sept. 18, 2018, 1:39 p.m.

Palos

The Topeak ratchet was purchased based on the review of the smaller version here. Got the extra plus version as my old chainbreaker had recently died.

*edit - hey, the image worked!

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cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - Sept. 18, 2018, 9:53 p.m.

FOUR tire levers?!?!?

We gotta work on your tire changing skills.

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velocipedestrian
0
Velocipedestrian  - Sept. 19, 2018, 2:23 p.m.

I have three weak excuses, which I tie together to make a weak reason:

1. Current tyre/rim combo (Schwalbe/Sun Ringle) is a real morale breaker. 

2. The one thing I'm prone to loosing is levers. 

3. The little Topeak alloy ones are emergency morale recovery use only. 

Sorry.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+1 Cam McRae
Sanesh Iyer  - Sept. 17, 2018, 11:34 p.m.

A blessed soul gave me a pair of valve extenders for free from the BC Bicycle Buy and Sell FB group. I was having valve core pull out problems with my pump , turns out putting one of those between my pump and the valve solves the issue. Got me home from very far in the middle of nowhere. Not a fan of gauges (they break), and CO2 I save for cold days. 

I'm a big fan of carrying a normal allen key set, steel-core tire levers, a proper chain tool, zap straps, small multi (screw driver and torx use), a pump, knife, light, tube, spare hanger, and a small first aid kit. Somehow this all fits into my tiny 2L Dakine hip pack in addition to my phone, wallet, and snack. I suppose the sacrifice I make is not being able to de-layer. Between a good shell (Gore or Pertex), full-length pit-zips, and wool I'm able to manage thermally without actually delayering (waterproof jacket pockets are the only place to store spare gloves) which frees up pack space.

Also, tube always always always in a ziplock bag for me. Nothing sucks more than a stray rock or stick popping your tube just because you let it get muddy.

Reply

skyler
+1 Cam McRae
Skyler  - Sept. 18, 2018, 1:29 a.m.

FYI, your valve core tool appears to be redundant. I can see one on your multi tool - the notch at the end of the chain tool is wider than a chain pin because it's a valve core wrench. Works with every multi tool I've tried, anyway.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+1 Cam McRae
Sanesh Iyer  - Sept. 18, 2018, 6:11 a.m.

.... Mind blown. There's always another trick. Thanks!

Reply

ac
+1 ZigaK
Ac  - Sept. 18, 2018, 12:56 p.m.

I carry a shock pump and a presta to schrader adapter. There are plenty of times I've needed a shock pump. And with the adapter it works as a tire pump. Yes it takes a little longer but with tubeless its incredibly rare to need it. Plus it has a built it pressure gauge, something most portable pumps don't.

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Kevin26
0
Kevin26  - Sept. 18, 2018, 8:58 p.m.

Never heard of doing that before, have you ever changed a flat with it? Must take forever from zero psi.

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ac
0
Ac  - Sept. 19, 2018, 10:59 a.m.

Yep, I've helped a stranger put in a new tube with it. Sure takes longer but if you aren't racing, who cares? Try it at home with your shock pump you already own and see if it works for you.

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amrskipro
0
AndrewR  - Sept. 22, 2018, 9:10 p.m.

Who cares? Anyone who is dying from mosquito bite induced blood loss and humidity induced dehydration whilst trying to help some one fix a flat with shitty kit in July or August in most parts of BC. That guy (or girl) cares.....a lot!!

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cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Sept. 19, 2018, 8:24 a.m.

There are a few pumps specifically designed to do both. Some use a secondary chamber for when you are pumping a tire and need more volume. Unfortunately I haven’t found one that Is small enough because you are right - I often need a shock pump but rarely have one these days. My lord if the squirrels descent was spoiled this summer by a sloppy mechanic and me being too rushed to check/adjust the pressure he put in my fork. A shock pump would have saved me.  Now if someone designed a functional short shaft dual purpose pump I’d be all over it.

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amrskipro
0
AndrewR  - Sept. 22, 2018, 9:20 p.m.

100 ml EDC Pump (including EDC tool and jabber plug) on the frame (water bottle mount) and Birzman Zacoo Macht shock pump (which fits vertically in any riding pack and horizontally in an EVOC or Dakine hip pack) so both jobs, tyres and shocks, can now be done properly. 

Topeak 20 and Leatherman Squirt (scissors & sharp knife) in the pocket, a quick link taped to the brake line and a Wolftooth Quick link plier, this does the chain and the tubeless valve issue, with a 12 speed and 11 speed quick link also in the hip pack (or pocket). This is also an extra (albeit metal) tyre lever if you are helping someone who's tyres need gorrilla-ing.

29" Tube & tyre boot (inside a plastic bag) and metal cored Axiom lever strapped to the frame with an EDC strap. 

Zip ties inside the crank spindle, plugged in place by Duct tape wrapped around a short length of re-used/ cut down take away chop stick.

Finally spare hanger taped under saddle with 3M 2228 Electrical mastic (keeps it dry , clean and rattle free).

Reply

jason
0
jason  - Sept. 19, 2018, 6:33 p.m.

Late to the party, but what a good thread.  I used carry tonnes of stuff as Cam noted.  I still carry a pack (and have two packs.  One for DH and one for all mountain).  I remember life before a Camelbak with all the stuff on the bike.  The Camelbak was a revelation.  Would still rather put stuff on my back than bike or fanny.

That said, I don’t carry much.  Water, tube, KMC tire lever with missing link tool incorporated, old school Allen key set with added torx Allen key, zap straps, plugs w bacon strip and valve core, pump w gorilla tape (no C02).  Never had the need to seat a tire with Stan’s rim and Magic Mary.

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