CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM.JPG
REVIEW

CushCore 29 Plus Inserts - Much More Of A Good Thing?

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Mar 31, 2020

The CushCore Install Myth

There's this myth that it's hard to install CushCore inserts. It's not. Read the instructions, watch the videos, be systematic, but really all you need to know is to tuck that tire bead as far under the insert as possible all the way around and it will go together without an abundance of cursing. Once you've done it a few times it's still a task, but not an undertaking. It's made even easier for those riders who are managing weight gain by ditching their downhill tires for more pliable single-ply versions.

Removal can be another story. My new favourite game on the trail is to watch for those telltale green valve stems and then sneakily check if either of the rider's tires are on backward. If you're wondering, yes I've come across a few. I'm a big fan of Gorilla tape and the guarantee my rim is sealed but I'll tell you when my DH tires bonded to my rim tape with the MEGA-sized Plus-version of CushCore installed it took four beers over two days to get two wheels sorted. So, so frustrating.

I highlight this fact because every day of the week I'll gladly manage that occasional PITA at tire-swap-time to run CushCore. It's totally worth it. Every day. Every tech-gnar Shore trail. Especially on the back wheel.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM.JPG

They're 'uge and at 334-grams per unit there's zero doubt when I'm riding wheels with CushCore+ installed.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

This insert's looking a little bit beat going onto its third rim but there's been zero loss in performance. They may last forever?!

I've done multiple installs and removals. I've run the inserts with 3" Bontrager SE4 tires and 2.6" SE5 tires, which are the lightest sidewall I'd consider these days, and also mainly with WTB's Tough Casing Vigilantes in 29 x 2.8 and 2.6. I've run these setups on Velocity's Dually 29 rims, RaceFace ARC 40 rims, and most recently on WTB's KOM rims with the Heavy Duty option in the rear and the Lighter option up front. All these setups have a 39mm or 40mm internal rim width and all the rims are fairly shallow. All of these rims are aluminum.

CushCore may be a great equalizer, particularly running low pressures with the Plus setup. I couldn't tell any difference between various wheel stiffnesses with CushCore installed, whereas without it, Dually rims are closer to carbon rim stiffness compared to the others. All these wheels were laced by my friend Dumpster Bear so the build variable is removed.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

Some folks drop down to lighter, more compliant sidewalls when running inserts, but I'm loving my multiple years of flat-free riding so it's full-on tires for me.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

My only piece of CushCore installation advice - check the rotation direction three times before installing to limit the number of times you have to remove and re-install them.

In terms of bikes, I've run the system fully rigid on my V1 and V2 Waltworks, with a 100mm fork on the V2, and both front & rear and rear only on my Marin Alpine Trail with 150mm rear travel and 160mm and 180mm front travel. In the same time period, I've run all of these setups without CushCore as well for comparison's sake. I would have loved to try the CushCore inserts on the upgraded Trek Stache to compare with less aggressive geometry, shorter wheelbase, and less plow-style riding.

With CushCore Plus installed I've also had to ride out with a flat rear (slashed sidewall) and my bike was surprisingly controllable and rideable. On the front, any less than 10psi starts to feel squirrelly even with the insert. Generally, I'm running the 2.8" Vigilantes with 12psi front & rear and without I run the same tires with 17psi front and rear, although I do more-than-occasionally kiss rims when riding without CushCore on rigid setups and the rear rim on the hardtail.

I talked more about installing the system in my first look, and I've done it a few times since. I'm more than happy to answer any questions in the comments.

So Damped...

Why does CushCore Plus have to feel so awesome on the descents? I love the support when I lean my bike over when running 12psi in 2.8" rubber. The already traction-endowed tires grip even better on greasy-green rock and wood. The damping, especially noticeable on a fully rigid bike, is essentially suspension. On the hardtail, my legs feel less beat up on any bumpy descent and I notice myself putting together longer sections of trail without taking a break. Plus tires on hardtails, now that they're available with real sidewalls, offer a larger margin of error choosing lines and braking points down steep greasy trails and CushCore increases that margin by an order of magnitude.

Why's that a problem? I'm the number one fan of that damped ride feel down and across but accelerating 1688 grams of rubber per wheel (tires and inserts combined) is an exercise in patience going up the trail. Once the wheels are rolling it's not a huge deal to maintain momentum but technical climbing moves require some extra muscle. The inspired traction out back does make up some of the difference, especially when rolling up arresting roots in a big gear.

CushCore sells all their inserts as singles now for those that just want to save on rear rims and get a traction and comfort boost in the rear of their hardtail, but after trying both setups I'm a strong advocate of running it front and rear on the semi-rigid setup where front-wheel traction is so important on aggressive trails. The extra mass is much less noticeable front v. rear when climbing and it's a great idea to rotate the tire inserts when swapping out to fresh rubber.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (5).JPG

I think CushCore and Plus Tires are a combined must-have for riding rigid forks on technical North Shore trails.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (6).JPG

The system is still a net benefit on the front of a hardtail, particularly running a shorter travel fork like my 100mm setup.

On my full suspension bike, there are no returns uphill as I have 150mm of coil-sprung travel and plenty of traction from big sticky rubber. When riding down technical terrain traction isn't at the same premium either, so I can run a bit more pressure in the rear to resist rim strikes. Lean-over traction isn't as noticeable either through a combination of extra air pressure and the fact I'm already running really supportive sidewalls.

The combination of factors means that I'd choose to run either big rubber with air support only, or smaller rubber with CushCore on the long(er) travel full suspension platform. The more I'm relying on the tires for traction, support, and suspension comfort, the more I'm recommending CushCore combined with Plus tires.

I haven't ridden a recent 27+ platform but it would be at the top of my list to ride a short travel one with aggressive geometry and CushCore+. I'm thinking of the latest generation of Tallboy, Stumpjumper ST, Marin's newest Rift Zone, and whatever the next generation Kona Hei Hei looks like assuming it allows for 27 x 2.8" rubber.

CushCore 29 Plus NSMB AndrewM (9).JPG

CushCore Plus changed how fast I could ride my V1 rigid bike - I mean, Scare Yourself, right? - and influenced the geometry of my V2.

Manitou Mezzer NSMB AndrewM (21).JPG

On the full suspension front, I'll either go CushCore with smaller rubber or run 2.8" tires but the combination of both is too much of a good thing.

To sum all that up, where I live I wouldn't ride my rigid mountain bike without CushCore Plus and Plus-sized rubber and I also feel like it's invaluable on my hardtail. I'm beyond curious to ride it on a short-travel full-suspension platform with 29+ or 27+ rubber but when it comes to a longer travel full suspension bike I'll either take CushCore in smaller rubber or I'll run air only in my Plus-sized rubber with real sidewalls.

How good is Plus-sized CushCore for the applications I'll run it in? It's amazing. It's worth every dollar of the 150 USD per set, notwithstanding the combined 668 grams of rotating mass. It pays for every little bit of effort getting the wheels uphill and you won't see me riding aggressive trails on my hardtail without inserts. The difference in ride quality, comfort, traction, and support provides a great return on investment - both money and effort.

I know plenty of riders who are on CushCore and CushCore XC these days with generally rave feedback. Is there anyone reading who's put miles on the Plus version?

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Comments

Kelownakona
+4 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman Mammal Carmel
Kelownakona  - March 31, 2020, 1:13 a.m.

Absolutely nothing to do with Cushcore Andrew, just wanted to thank you as I recently bought a new saddle and took your recommendation on the Koda. Great advice its perfect :)

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 7:12 a.m.

Cheers! Still haven’t found a saddle that works better for me at any price.

Reply

Tremeer023
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
Tremeer023  - March 31, 2020, 3:43 a.m.

Haven't got a plus size version but did recently install a regular one in the rear of my spare wheel set.  About 20 mins of swearing and sore fingers later and yes, the bl**dy tyre was on backwards (facepalm). 

Anyway, re-did it but tyre wouldn't inflate.   I used Gorilla tape but due to the tightness and having to tuck the bead under the already tight fitting insert, the tape kept peeling back exposing the spoke holes.  Got fed up in the end so took it to LBS with a sorry look on my face ha-ha.  I will be using regular rim tape next time.

Haven't been able to test it properly yet, maybe in 2021.

Reply

FLATCH
+1 Andrew Major
flatch  - March 31, 2020, 4:45 a.m.

Curious, how was it getting the tire off?

Reply

Tremeer023
0
Tremeer023  - March 31, 2020, 4:49 a.m.

About as easy coming off as putting it on for me.

Reply

LoamtoHome
0
Jerry Willows  - April 1, 2020, 11:49 a.m.

one of the reasons I don't run CC anymore.  Rimpact is a much easier insert to deal with and is lighter.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 1, 2020, 2:08 p.m.

How does Rimpact compare performance wise though? On my hardtail the performance advantage of CC+ downhill is awesome. On the FS bike certainly rim protection becomes a more of a key talking point since rear suspension provides traction and comfort.

Reply

Makkelijk
+1 Andrew Major
Douwe Kasemier  - April 3, 2020, 10:07 p.m.

I have both. I don’t think Rimpact will last that long on the back of a hardtail but on a fully it will be fine. It does not damp the ride that much though.

You should concider a Vittoria Airliner. I think it will make you very happy on longer travel bikes.

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 7:26 p.m.

I definitely haven't come across something better for the back wheel of a hardtail (and front wheel with a rigid) but I acknowledge that many of the advantages of the CC on the hardtail are less pronounced on a FS bike (especially a longer travel one) which opens up the possibility of many lighter options.

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 7:17 a.m.

First off apologies for including the bit about spying for backwards rubber. Should have known I was jinxing someone. Second...

I NEED the details!!!

-Internal rim width and model

-Tire model (size/sidewall)

In terms of Gorilla Tape - probably an article in here - do you buy the narrow rolls or the full size rolls and cut them down?

I use the full size and cut the width such that the tape comes up the sides of the rim some. Works way more consistently, for me, than the narrow rolls.

Reply

D_C_
+1 Andrew Major
DMVancouver  - March 31, 2020, 5:30 p.m.

The narrow roll was perfect for old 23-25 mm rims (like Stan’s Flow EX). It’s like it was made for them. Maybe we can convince Gorilla Tape to come out with a 30 mm-ish wide roll so I don’t have to cut the wide one.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 10:14 p.m.

Enough different stuff going on here (and value of big roll better) that I’m fine with cutting the size I need. Have also experimented with different widths (how far the tape comes up the sides of the rims). I agree though, Tape for 30mm ID rims would be a solid buy for lots of folks.

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Tremeer023
+1 Andrew Major
Tremeer023  - April 1, 2020, 2:45 p.m.

No worries on the tyre, not the first time and won't be the last. 

Rim is WTB Asym 35mm internal diameter.  Tyre Minion DHR 2.4 EXO Maxx Grip.  27.5 wheels. 

Narrow roll tape.

I understand that Gorilla tape usually makes a mess of your rim if stuck properly and mine didn't so maybe I just didn't stick it down enough.  It was fitted in coldish temperature.

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mint355
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
mint355  - March 31, 2020, 5:53 a.m.

Yes!!! I've got a set of 275+ cushcores on my BTR Ranger+ absolutely transformed the ride. Ive been running WTB 3.0 Tough casing tyres. essential on a hardtail, the dampened feel is unreal.

the struggle is real to get them in the tyre!!!!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 7:20 a.m.

What model if WTB tire are you running?

I ran a mullet hardtail for quite a while and decided for the hardtail I preferred dual 29”... but with CC+ and big rubber I’m now not as certain.

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mint355
0
mint355  - April 5, 2020, 4:37 p.m.

Sorry Andrew missed your comment.Tthey are WTB Ranger Tough Fast 3.0 tyres. Cheers

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 7:27 p.m.

I keep looking at the Ranger (Tough, run at low pressure with CC) as a faster rolling (but still heavy) option for my single speed. Turning the Vigilante Tough/Fast up the road to the trails is a fairly miserable undertaking.

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mint355
+1 Andrew Major
mint355  - April 5, 2020, 8:15 p.m.

Yeah, they seem to have enough traction @11-12 psi F-R and rolling resistance is managable. Im keen to see a bike check on your waltworks!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 9:09 p.m.

Cheers! I am working on a write-up for NSMB. I wanted to get a bunch of hours on the bike with a suspension fork first as I'm talking about both setups and the fit is very different.

Jotegir
+3 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major twk
Lu Kz  - March 31, 2020, 8:17 a.m.

I'm loving all the recycled aahh hmm I mean revisited topics these past few weeks courtesy of Andrew. 

When people complain about installing cushcore, I always wonder what they consider more work: installing cushcore or re-lacing a new alloy rim? Maybe that's just a concern for a talentless fatass like me who will guaranteed smash my alloy rear rim up in a season or two of bike park. Hasn't been a problem on my hard tail after swapping to Carbon (just send it in to those rocks, lifetime replacement baby!), but now that I'm not regularly wheel building anymore I'd rather install cushcore any day of the week.

Edit: I think it's been suggested here in the past, but some of my friends have said that taking something to "calm their nerves" while installing cushcore has helped.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 8:49 a.m.

Hahahahaha, cheers & guilty. 

Great point re. time for wheel building. In these strange times a CushCore install/removal is definitely better for blowing off steam as well!

Reply

Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - March 31, 2020, 9:15 a.m.

Been thinking about maybe getting a Rocky Growler. Do a few upgrades and cush core for extra traction and piece of mind . It's been far too long since I've tackled Shore trails on a hard tail with fat tires. 

Do you run less/more or the same amount of sealant with cush core?

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AndrewMajor
+1 Andy Eunson
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 12:11 p.m.

I run the same. I mean once you’re running CushCore you’ve committed to not caring about weight!

Reply

Shoreloamer
+1 Andrew Major
Greg Bly  - April 2, 2020, 9:17 a.m.

The hot ticket for hard tails at one time was three inch Gazzies mounted to a Sunn double wide rim with DH tubes. 

I'm thinking this modern wide tire set up is a tad lighter.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - April 3, 2020, 6:19 p.m.

Hahahaha. I think my 2.8” Heavy Duty Vigilantes combined with CC+ (almost 1700 grams of rubber per wheel) is heavier than my 3” Gazzis on DWs BUT, might be easier to remove! 

I will say that my current set up delivers what that setup promised! 

I could ride my SS 29+ hardtail happily for the rest of time. The wheels are heavy to turn over on steep pitches but I’m not racing anyone.

Reply

4Runner1
+4 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman Lu Kz Cam McRae
4Runner1  - March 31, 2020, 11:08 a.m.

Thanks for keeping these interesting reads coming.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 7:28 p.m.

Cheers! Thanks for reading.

Reply

khai
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
khai  - March 31, 2020, 11:17 a.m.

I've been running 27.5+ tyres (2.8 Maxxis DHR II F/R ) on my HT since Autumn, and just put in a CushCore on the rear a few weeks ago.  I only got a handful of rides on Fromme/Seymour before I decided to shut things down temporarily but I quite like it thus far.  The rear end seems a little more damped when going fast over the rough stuff, and is nicely supportive at 16psi.  No traction complaints - though I am curious if it would improve if i were to drop even lower.  I haven't tried lower than 15psi and that was on a particularly wet and greasy day, but I am curious to see how it goes once I start riding again.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 khai
Andrew Major  - March 31, 2020, 12:13 p.m.

On the hardtail I think more than traction (you’re running real rubber) you’ll find with a bit less pressure you’ll be ripping faster and feeling less beat. Air down until it feels squirrelly and then add a psi.

Reply

khai
+1 Andrew Major
khai  - March 31, 2020, 12:26 p.m.

I'll try that.  Thanks!  :)

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 7:28 p.m.

So? Did you have a chance to play with air pressure?

Reply

IslandLife
+1 Andrew Major
IslandLife  - March 31, 2020, 3:32 p.m.

Got my hands on a set of Cushcore XC for dirt cheap... just installed on wheels (30 ID 27.5 rims, with Maxxis 2.5 DHF EXO+ front and Maxxis 2.4 DHR II EXO+ rear).  Had some trouble until I finally figured out what they meant by pushing the bead into the centre... duh... using a tire level and pushing that bead in gives you so much more to work with and definately made the job much easier... until I realized my tire was the wrong way around... hahahaha!!  Not going to lie... definately considered leaving it like that... "Hmm.. maybe I should experiment?  Maybe it'll work better??"  In the end I fixed it.

Really curious to see how the XC version holds up... especially paired with the EXO+'s.  Won't be able to tell you for a little while though... Covid (what a dick) is really messing with supply chains... my new bike missed it's flight and had to be thrown on a slow boat from Taiwan... hoping for mid to late April... even then, may not be able to give a true "what for".

Reply

neologisticzand
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
Chad K  - March 31, 2020, 8:09 p.m.

Related, while also slightly unrelated, but I've really loved cushcore CX on my gravel bike these past few months. I really can drop down the pressure and it allows for some extra confidence when it comes to protecting carbon rims from rocks when using smaller tires (40c). Maybe the smaller sizes are easier to install, but I've even swapped tires in 10-15 minutes a wheel.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 1, 2020, 9:41 a.m.

I was checking out the system as a potential upgrade for my wife’s commuter. Keep the sweet ride of the Schwalbe gravel tires but add some run flat potential and the ability to go lower pressure on gravel. It’s a one time purchase so easy enough to amortize.

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neologisticzand
+1 Andrew Major
Chad K  - April 1, 2020, 10:20 a.m.

It's been great with my Schwalbe G-ones. They don't have the most volume and are a pretty soft casing so they bottom out easily. The cush core inserts are great for that extra protection. Plus, cushcore was even nice enough to throw in a spare set of valves for me since my rims are too deep for the stock valves.

Last ride I did I was at 21/28 psi and I weigh 175 without any gear.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 3, 2020, 6:11 p.m.

She’s running G-One Bite tires so this sounds perfect.

Reply

straightup
+1 Andrew Major
noah wilcox  - April 1, 2020, 9:35 a.m.

ive been running the 27.5+ inserts front and rear for over a year now. Im on the tough casing wtb vigilante 2.8 on a wide set of mercury hoops. All this is shoe horned into a 2018 honzo st with 2 degree works headset. Safe to say that im not going back. Hands down single most noticable improvement to the ride quality of the bike. Im 165 and i run 13ish psi up from and 14 in the rear and have no problems keeping up with the boys on there fancy dual suspension bikes.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 1, 2020, 9:47 a.m.

It is pretty crazy how capable a hardtail gets with really capable Plus rubber and inserts. Even how capable a rigid bike gets!

Keeping up depends on the trails and if the person on other bike knows we’re racing (Hahahaha) but I agree, pointed downhill, taking two riders of equal guts and ability that CC+ is a great equalizer hardtail v. FS.

Running standard Honzo or Big Honzo? How much fork travel (what fork?). Have you considered going mullet with 29+ up front?

Reply

straightup
+1 Andrew Major
noah wilcox  - April 1, 2020, 11 a.m.

Standard honzo in steal. Its got a yari 150mm chassis with an avalanche cartridge in there. I want to go down the rigid road for a bit and when I do i'll probably try out the 29+ at the same time.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Greg Bly
Andrew Major  - April 3, 2020, 6:10 p.m.

Loved my Avy cartridge (Fox 34 model back in 2013/14-ish). Shout out to Craig @ who definitely knows his product inside and out.

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cedrico
+1 Andrew Major
cedrico  - April 1, 2020, 12:12 p.m.

I've been riding 27x2.8 Schwalbe Hans Dampf with Cushcore 27+ front and rear on a full suspension trail bike (150mm travel front and rear). I use Stans Baron rims (35mm internal width), and I usually set tire pressure to ~18psi rear and ~15psi front. This setup is great all around, except I wouldn't mind trying a faster rolling tire in the rear for dry days.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 3, 2020, 6:05 p.m.

Have you experimented with lower pressure? Is the Hansdampf SnakeSkin or SuperGrav?!

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cedrico
+1 Andrew Major
cedrico  - April 5, 2020, 6:55 p.m.

Yeah I have experimented with lower pressure, but I avoid going too low for tire stability and rim protection reasons. My Hans Dampf tires have SnakeSkin sidewalls - they're these ones, specifically: https://www.bike24.com/p2308059.html?q=hans%20dampf

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 5, 2020, 7:30 p.m.

Yeah, the SnakeSkin tires are reasonably durable but there isn't much initial support there at lower pressure so they feel a bit squirrely until they flex into the CC support if you aren't a fairly light rider.

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cedrico
0
cedrico  - April 10, 2020, 1:55 p.m.

Huh. I haven't noticed much squirreliness, but I have yet to try other brands or models in this 27x2.8 size. Let me know if you have suggestions!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - April 21, 2020, 4:20 p.m.

Hi Cedrico,

Apologies that I missed your message. 

Have you tried Schwalbe's Super Gravity casing? If you like their tires the SG versions have a lot more support. 

Personally, I like the WTB Vigilante for a Plus-sized MTB tire. I run the Tough Casing but even the Light Casing has good support. Fast or Grip compounds depending on where you ride. Comparably reasonable price (but giving up nothing in performance to save a few bucks). 

Hope that's helpful!

cedrico
0
cedrico  - April 21, 2020, 4:30 p.m.

I tried a Super Gravity casing tire in the rear a while ago when I was getting tired of rim strikes and the usual flat tires that resulted, but I really didn't like the rolling resistance. Reduced playfulness might of also been a factor; I like jumping around and fooling around on my bike, while being able to plow through stuff when needed. Now that I'm using Cushcore inserts, I don't feel the need for Super Gravity casing for rim/flat protection, and I also feel like I get enough support with my current tires. But maybe if I tried a tire with more support now, my view would change. Thanks for your suggestion about WTB Vigilantes. I might try those when my current tires wear out.

cedrico
0
cedrico  - April 10, 2020, 1:54 p.m.

This comment has been removed.

Wandering
0
Wandering  - April 20, 2020, 2:06 p.m.

I am running a Vassago JabberWocky with matching rigid Odis fork and WTB Ranger 29x3.0 tires. This has turned out to be the most fun bike I have owned in 20 years! I am keen to try CushCore, but also hoping WTB will come out with a 29x2.8 Trail Boss. I have considered CushCore with the Maxxis Rekon Plus, but always been more of WTB loyalist. Anyone have an inside track on what WTB may be up to?

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AndrewMajor
+1 Wandering
Andrew Major  - April 21, 2020, 12:19 a.m.

Cheers! I haven't heard anything about a big T.Boss coming. I'm running the 2.8" Vigilante but it is a lot of tires compared to the Ranger. It makes sense to have something in between them. I'll see if I can find out about anything fresh.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Wandering
Andrew Major  - April 21, 2020, 4:16 p.m.

I heard back from WTB. Like me, the folks there who love big rubber and aggressive trails are running the Vigilante. I like the support of the Tough Casing and the grip of the High Grip compound (front tire / I run the fast-rolling rear) but switching to the Light Casing option and going Fast Rolling at both ends may give you the right balance?

Anyways, WTB thinks a 29x2.8" T.Boss would be awesome but it's not something that's coming out in the near future. 

-

I'm quite the opposite, I've never been any kind of tire loyalist AND as blasphemous as this (apparently) is I don't even care if my front and rear tire are the same brands if they give me the performance that I want. I have min-maxing in my blood and I like that WTB makes a fantastic tire at a more affordable price than tires with comparable performance.

Anyways, it's bizarre to me that both my personal bikes have Vigilante tires front and rear. I've ridden plenty of good tires and that's not to say that I'm not interested in trying all the other rubber out there (regardless of price) but as it sits if I needed rubber tomorrow I wouldn't have to think about what to buy.

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Wandering
+1 Andrew Major
Wandering  - April 22, 2020, 5:45 a.m.

Certainly given me a lot to think about, thanks!

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