Cane Creek IL Air Update NSMB Andrew Major Title
REVIEW

Cane Creek 'Covid-Created' Double Barrel (CCDB) IL Air

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Dec 5, 2022
Reading time

Paperweight

I was talking with Noel from Aenomaly Constructs about the best value for a new rear shock; not the cheapest, not the best performing for the smallest upfront investment, but rather my picks for a long-term suspension investment. How I'd invest my own hard-scratched cash on a new shock will change like the weather, starting with whether I'm in a coil or air spring frame of mind, but these days it's not a conversation I can have without mentioning the Cane Creek Double Barrel (CCDB) IL Air shock on my Marin Rift Zone.

Noel brings up that he'd had a first-generation CCDB Inline Air on his Specialized which had served him well and was now in retirement somewhere at his place, and that is where the conversation gets interesting. These shocks had significant small-OE penetration and since my first piece on this CCDB upgrade went live I've talked to a few folks who had one sitting around in a box, or picked a blown one up off a friend for a couple of cases of beer. Their experiences matched my own. You simply can't go wrong when you take an Inline Air you already own or pick up for cheap, add in a routine 100hr/yearly service (220 CAD), and the full upgrade package including the inner & outer air cans and black shock body (135 CAD). This shock was locally rebuilt at SuspensionWerx, and your preferred authorized Cane Creek service and tuning center offers the same service.

It's up-cycling an existing product, that could be almost a decade old, to match the current spec of one of the best performing and most tuneable inline shocks on the market - for somewhere around half price.

Cane Creek IL Air Shock Upgrade SuspensionWerx NSMB Andrew Major (7)

An original Cane Creek DB Inline Air.

Cane Creek IL Air Shock Upgrade SuspensionWerx NSMB Andrew Major (36)

Upgrade kit & 100hr Service.

Cane Creek IL Air Shock Upgrade SuspensionWerx NSMB Andrew Major (42)

Upgraded to current CCDB IL Air spec.

My own experience started with my teardown piece on this specific 2014 & 2022 CCDB IL Air. I'd ridden my previous Rift Zone with a rebuilt CCDB Coil CS shock, with a piggyback, and I loved that setup. I don't care about weight and the 5" Rifty platform pops even with the increasingly damped ride of a coil spring but there was simply nothing available at the peak of the COVID parts shortage. I actually had the bike completely ready to roll other than a rear shock and Cane Creek, like most companies, was completely out of inventory in any option. But, they did have service parts.

Thus a project was born. Starting out with an original CCDB Inline Air that had been sitting in a box for at least a few years following the previous owner riding it into the ground and electing not to get it serviced. It was a first-generation Cane Creek Double Barrel Inline Air shock which would have suffered from the bladder-related bleeding and general massively-ramped-production issues of the species along with the fact that the air cans were simply too voluminous, or 'coil-like' if you prefer, for many short-to-mid travel bikes of the time.

Yes, with the right frame and a really good bleed, or with the updated bladders that came out around a year later, it was a good little shock for the day. The key feature, present in all Cane Creek shocks, being that the architecture allows for the full tuning range to be externally accessible with a 3mm hex key. There's no need to tear down the shock to revalve the damper for the best performance with a given frame. This newest version, now known as the IL and also available in a coil-sprung version, carries over the damper layout and adds better-tuned air volumes and construction updates that make it much more robust.

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

My previous generation Rift Zone 29" with a rebuilt, re-sized, Cane Creek CCDB CS shock.

Cane Creek IL Air Marin Rift Zone NSMB Andrew Major (2)

My, well, now it's also a previous-gen Rifty, with this CCDB IL Air shock installed.

My Rifty is a coil-shock-friendly frame, and I'm running this IL Air shock with no volume spacers and about 25% sag. I have used full travel, but never harshly such that I'd consider reducing the volume. A similarly-sized rider who prefers more sag would likely find themselves popping the outer air can to play with reducers, which is easy to do. I know some riders find tuning Cane Creek's rear shocks to be intimidating, since a full range of damper adjustments to suit any bike are available externally at the turn of a 3mm hex key. If you invest just a little bit of time when you first install the shock it can be as set-and-forget or perfectly dialed in as you're prepared to get it.

Unlike most suspension products, the settings on Cane Creek's shocks are listed from the open positions. I start with the high-speed compression (HSC) at 2.5/4.5 turns, the high-speed rebound (HSR) at 3.5/4.5 turns, the low-speed compression (LSC) at 10/18 clicks, and the low-speed rebound (LSR) at 10/18 clicks. The first thing I adjust after setting sag is finding the right LSR speed for me and then I hit the trail. If my bike starts feeling out of whack as I play with bracketing settings, I simply return to this base tune.

The only tuning tip I'd add is to do with the high-speed and low-speed poppet valve architecture. Sometimes folks complain that these dampers can feel a bit harsh and that can almost always be traced to the not enough HSC and/or HSR.

Marin Rift Zone NSMB Andrew Major

I love short travel bikes with the geometry of long travel bikes. My Rift Zone is running 120mm front travel, 125mm rear, -2° Wolf Tooth angleset, and is a 29'er or mullet depending on the day.

There are so many metrics in choosing a rear shock - price, service cost, reliability, a brand's reputation for long-term support, tuneability, user serviceability, ease of setup, specific frame pairings - that it's really impossible to recommend 'the one' shock these days. Even if you narrow it down to air vs. coil and we specify an amount of travel. A fresh CCDB IL Air, compared to other shocks in the 700-ish CAD price range, has a lot going for it in terms of user tuneability as well as performance in a non-reservoir shock. It's easy to recommend, but there are other solid contenders in the price range and, of course, you can easily spend twice that amount for a custom-built shock from PUSH or go halfway and buy a reliable basic air shock like an SR Suntour Edge.

The clear win with the Cane Creek shocks is the long-term support and backward compatibility. Where this shock delivers excellent traction and support climbing (wide open, I never use the Climb Switch) and where I find the traction, comfort, and support descending to be on par with other top-end air shocks I've used, the price makes it that much sweeter. This is especially true for riders who already own an older Inline shock or can find one in need of a rebuild for an excellent price.

Check out Cane Creek for more information on the IL Air shock, and check in with your preferred authorized service centre for more information on upgrades to existing Inline Air shocks.

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Comments

cheapondirt
cheapondirt
2 months ago
+4 Andrew Major Cr4w bishopsmike imnotdanny

As I type this comment, Cane Creek's website has these shocks listed at 40% off. It was a black friday sale but appears to still be going. That's a killer deal.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0 cheapondirt mnihiser

KILLER deal. It’s a great shock with long-term support. 

I still think the best value for anyone with an old one kicking around is the price update & rebuild.

Reply

bishopsmike
bishopsmike
2 months ago
+3 Andrew Major cheapondirt Blofeld

Apparently they're running that 40% discount on both their inline shocks until they clear out their stock - air and coil. It actually makes it a pretty tough decision between $180 US for the full service vs. $310 US for an entire brand new shock (and you'd still have the first to sell or keep as back-up).  These are the Black Friday problems that torment me...

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

The Rifty is a versatile bike, if I was going to over-fork it, and was going with a new shock, the IL coil would be my first choice. I’m not too worried about weight mind you.

Reply

cheapondirt
cheapondirt
2 months ago
+2 Andrew Major bishopsmike

I chose the service option without much thought (Swerx 20% off for black fri) but I could see that being an actual decision for quite a few people in different situations!

Reply

snowsnake
Duncan Wright
2 months ago
0

I’m a little bit sad-panda that I already picked up a SDU air for my REEB SST (woo, lots of caps lock there). I know it’s also a terrific shock but what a deal!

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I had a CC IL spec'd on a frame I bought in 2017. Set the damper to the recommended settings in the CC frame library and just rode the bike for a bunch of years. It was a great shock. Coming on the heels of the previous model's reliability problems I kept expecting it to shit the bed, but it never did.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
+1 Vik Banerjee

IL air or coil are great little shocks. Is that what you’re running in the GG? Ever tried a coil shock on that bike?

Reply

Vikb
Vik Banerjee
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I had the IL on a Knolly Endorphin. I've got a RS Super Deluxe Coil on the GG. It was really good stock and then I got Vorsprung to custom tune the damper and that made it perfect for that bike.

Reply

mickeyD
Mickey Denoncourt
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I have the same shock on a Rift Zone.  At 165 pounds I like 4 full volume bands with similar compression and rebound settings to you, except I can back the LSC compression way off.

Fwiw i have a Coil IL that I run with a 550/610 progressive wound spring and similar damper settings to my air shock.

Those frames are progressive, but if you are bringing a 120mm knife to a gun fight, going hog wild on volume reduction results in more dh speed on tracks with big compressions.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

I won’t argue about the versatility of the Rifty. My previous one - as shown - was over-forked with a coil CCDB. 

I think ‘balancing’ travel is over-rated (I am a hardtail person) but I will say my Rifty setup runs beautifully as a Tech-C bike paired with the Angleset and Magic Toothpick. 

That said, I’d be keen to ride it with more aggressive rubber, a 140-150 fork, and the coil IL shock - it’s a great shock in my experiences. 

What fork/travel are you bringing to Rifty gunfights?

Reply

mickeyD
Mickey Denoncourt
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I run my medium Riftzone 27.5 with a 140mm Helm(with lots of volume reduction and heavy LSC) and DHR’s and or Shorty’s(mostly with EXO casings and pressures in the mid 30’s), Fat rotor 200mm TRP’s front and rear, saint cranks, 10-36 10 speed casette, 50mm rise bars

I also run 55mm stroke on both shocks for a lil extra travel out back.

At 5’10” it’s my compact little swiss army knife for slalom racing, push-up riding, rut tracks and it’s main use, test riding the green and blue flow trails I build at work. 

I can still go smash out laps on the local winch and plummet- the stiff AF suspension and big bars keep it going straight, and bouncing over the top of  holes, and that firm chassis and big bar make high-speed corners a joy, even on an unfashionably short bike!

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

I wonder if there’s a correlation between the extra stroke and requiring the volume reduction? Are you running the same sag % as you did with the shorter stroke?

Love the Helm fork. Played around with volume and travel quite a bit running it as low as 100mm and as long as 160mm. Nice balance of stiffness, weight, and tuneability.

Post up some photos? If hosting is an issue email them to me and I’ll post them.

.

P.S. what 10spd drivetrain are you running? Sounds like my kind of bike - I’d just be running it mulleted.

Reply

mickeyD
Mickey Denoncourt
2 months ago
+6 Andrew Major Friday cheapondirt GB Derek Baker kcy4130

When I ordered through the backdoor, I received just a frame, OE headset and OE shock hardware. I initially installed the DBiL Coil with a 500 pound Valt Spring, then went to 550-610, and then ordered up a DBil air so I could mess with spring curve shape to my hearts content to get me the ride height I like/want/need on the slalom track for ultimate masters racing glory.

I had Cane Creek make me some custom stainless 3 piece hardware in lieu of the horrible aluminum hardware Marin ships with the bike after wallowing out the rocker 3 times in a month.

My back yard is a series of interconnected ruts that popped up during lockdown.

Lots of slap-chop pinball transfers into hook corners mean that since I got the frame in fall 2019 I've been through 3 chainstay assemblies, two shockstays, 7 rockers and innumerable sets of shock hardware and bearings. Daily use case is Lots of SEVERE flex and compression events, every two minutes, for five and a half hours at a time four days a week for about two years, give or take. All of that sessioning allowed me to fully bracket all my fork, shock, tire, wheel, bar settings, and made me deeply, deeply satisfied.

Between the yard ruts and some of the slalom tracks I ride, I found that I didn't have enough mechanical spring support through tight apexes on the coil. The coil shock (partially due to it's extra weight!) is my preference for grass slalom tracks, jank(as opposed to mechanically built) trail riding and having a good time, but if you need the bike to stay up in it's travel to get your rocks off, it's air IL for me. Sometimes I change between a coil shock and a front Shorty for qualifiers and air shock with a DHR front before rounds on a track that has some important corner exits. Go geeky, or stat home, that's my motto!

I run the 10speed sram GX short cage derailleur to keep my cage out the ruts. With my 34 tooth big ring(less pedal kickback!) the right gear for my gatestart is pretty much a straight line on an 11-36 HG cassette.

I just built up a new carbon Fuel EX Gen 6 frame (minolink on the m/l I ride turns it from 29" trail size to mullet slalom size!), so the ole Marin will probably live out the rest of it's days with the hubs re-laced to i25 rims so I can run 2.3 DHR's front and rear with a stumpy post and excavate the hell out of soft ground and ride the prefab 6' wood kickers the local trail club just installed in a park by my house/DORK OUT without having to turn over the excess volume of WT tire carcasses.

I already swapped from the 50mm stem/50mm rise bar to a 40mm stem/40mm and chopped 20mm off my normal bar width to make her a little bit happier on the rear wheel, and swapped to an i25 rear with a 2.3 Rock Razor to downsize the rear tire for a little bit better "dip in" through the berms. I kept the same volume reduction I would use for racing but decreased the HSR for some more pop and reduced the spring by about 10 psi so I can "stomp" the rear down a little bit better for manuals.

Such fun bikes- and with shocks that have a full tuning-range essentially at your fingertips, a potent platform for fun.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

Thanks! That thing looks like it would be stupidly grin-inducing good fun on the right trails. 

I was thinking about the Rock Razor the other day. It’s been a while since I had one or a Specialized Laughter - I wish some companies had made bigger volume versions of them for 29”. A 2.3” is just a bit harsh on the back of my hardtail.

kcy4130
kcy4130
2 months ago
+1 Mickey Denoncourt

"I've been through 3 chainstay assemblies, two shockstays, 7 rockers and innumerable sets of shock hardware and bearings."

Sheesh! That's a pretty high attrition rate!

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

Some folks just break stuff - charging on a short travel rig especially. Just from the write up I’d assume you wouldn’t find other similar travel rigs fair better in these circumstances.

mickeyD
Mickey Denoncourt
2 months ago
+1 kcy4130

Corner Violence is my passion.  

The outgoing Rifty(and the Polygons i’ve seen lately) are built a little too light in the rear end for the forces you can put into the frames with well tuned suspension and a rider dedicated to utmost lateral brutality.

Mine always break at the cross braces in the cs first(torsion fatigue) and at the same time the driveside chainstay detaches itself from the forged chainstay yoke.

I’m better at spotting the cracks in the shockstay before catastrophic failure, I just order replacements when the spiderweb paint cracks start.  

Fwiw, I haven’t had any catastrophic chainstay failures since i stuffed my DBIL aircan full of spacers!

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 months ago
0

I really appreciate the level of setup nerdery here. Quality post.

just6979
Justin White
1 month, 4 weeks ago
0

"but decreased the HSR for some more pop and reduced the spring by about 10 psi so I can "stomp" the rear down a little bit better for manuals."

I would be careful with reducing HSR, especially for that reason of "pop", and considering  that reducing HSR could reduce the effectiveness of the LSR adjuster as well, as was recently discussed elsewhere here.

Reducing HSR isn't going to have a significant impact on "pop" off jumps, or even little trail hits or, say,  even doubling up rollers. It will have an impact on "spud hops" or "English bunny hops"; but for jumps and such, especially "pre-fab wood kickers", you should be keeping the bike loaded until it's off the lip, so reducing rebound damping at all isn't going to do much, because it's not rebounding until you're in the air when the tire isn't pushing against anything

In fact, increasing HSR high can increase pop, and "stomping" the rear down as well: since it's going to assist your body weight at keeping the spring compressed and the rear loaded and squashed down. Along with keeping the spring rate high, that _will _help with pop, since between more spring and keeping it loaded up, there is more to push against.

joseph-crabtree
Joseph Crabtree
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I've got a 216/63 IL coil from an older frame resized to a 212/58 on my present bike with a mullet setup for 146mm of travel that maintains the geo of it with the stock 29 rear wheel and a 210/55 shock with 140mm of travel. This shock is 6 years old and has been rebuilt twice. Both bikes it has been on have a yoke that supposedly kills shocks.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

I’ve had a couple of CCDB CS shocks resized - relatively cheaply when in conjunction with the service they were do anyways - including the one that was on my old Rifty, twice. 

The economics vary depending on if it’s an IL air or coil and what you’re changing to/from but for folks who buy frame and swap parts or who play the used shock market I think it’s a great selling feature of CC shocks. 

.

Not all yoke bikes are equally bad and with coil shocks even if your frame eats it at least you’re just buying a shaft and seal head - versus air where you also need a body and can.

Reply

ijak
Jackson Li
2 months ago
0

Wondering what bike you have? I am on the edge about using this shock on a longer travel bike, but I am going for a lighter build, so this shock is definitely on the top of my list.

Reply

GB
GB
2 months ago
0

My Rp23 shock on my 2011 Spesh Enduro is showing its age .  

Longevity and support is very important to me . Unfortunately my frame uses proprietary mount . I wonder if I can modify the CC IL air shock to fit ? 

Huge bonus that Suspension werx will service these .  Treasure hunting for a used shock and upgrade , service at SW would be a fun project.  And relatively affordable.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

RP23 was such a great shock. It’s a shame Fox stopped supporting them (beyond seal kits). 

Have you looked into a BikeYoke link for your frame? Nice to divorce yourself from proprietary mounting and sizing.

Reply

GB
GB
2 months ago
0

I'm still not certain why the shocks are proprietary.  Different eyelet size ? Or different thickness of valve body?  I'm also not certain if I can still obtain a bike yoke that enables me to use any shock.  I have a rare Suntour Durolux shock and  2018 Fox  float that would work as well.  CC specd this frame with thiere shock so I'm hoping Suspension Werx can accommodate my request .  

I'm also curious how different the architecture is for the RP 23 compared to the Float .  I wonder if pistons and shims are the same ?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

The yoke direct mounts to the shock body instead of using an eyelet - like, for example, Kona did with their Process yokes pre-Trunnion. 

DVO still sells shocks that fit the configuration and others might too, but it drives me nuts to be tied into something Specialized even stopped supporting.

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GB
GB
2 months ago
0

Thank you for your input. Suspension werx sent me a link for getting a bike yoke adapter.  I've seen the yoke direct mounted to the previous Enduro model. This one does use a two piece yoke that's apparently bolted on . Time to take out the tools and remove the shock .

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ChazzMichaelMichaels
ChazzMichaelMichaels
2 months ago
0

I just had an RP23 over hauled. It's off my 09 Enduro SX so only about 100mm of travel but the shock will be the same. It was leaking from the rebound knob which is common once they reach a certain age. However it does mean a full overhaul to get to it.

I'd probably only go down the Bike Yoke route if you were desperate to try something else

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

No wear on the shaft, body, or can? Those parts aren't available any longer so once any of them is worn your shock is done. Unfortunately some folks will still take your money and service them anyways but you're on borrowed time at that point.

Reply

ChazzMichaelMichaels
ChazzMichaelMichaels
2 months ago
0

Not on either of the two that I have. I'm probably fortunate that they were ridden for a couple of years then just sat, given the age of the frame. Even now that particular bike might have had four or five hours riding in as many years.

How on earth do I upload a photo??

Reply

just6979
Justin White
2 months ago
0

"it can be as set-and-forget or perfectly dialed in"

Why are those (so often) presented as opposites? If it's perfectly dialed in, why does that somehow preclude just leaving it alone? Wouldn't having it perfectly dialed in actually lead to forgetting it?

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
+3 bishopsmike Justin White GB

Some folks just want to go ride their bike with minimal setup instead of taking the time to bracket a proper setup. 

It’s simply an acknowledgment that you can throw in some base settings and just ride your bike if that’s your preference - no different than shocks with less adjustment options.

Certainly, once I’m happy with my settings I just leave them except for checking the air pressure. But I did invest time in finding where I was happiest.

Reply

just6979
Justin White
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I see, OK. I guess it's that I don't see "throw in some base settings" as "setting" anything. And still not sure how that's any different than any other shock... 

Kind of understand some folks not wanting to go deeper into tuning (does everyone ride enough different trails that a few repeat runs on the same trail is so painful that you'd rather leave your multi-thousand-dollar machine unadapted to you? Another story...), but just putting it on the recommended settings and going... that's just "forget", to me.

(Yeah, we're overloading the words like "set" and "setting", makes it confusing but hopefully not too much.)

Either way, sounds like CC's base tune library is at least as good as a good OEM internal tune, and probably better since as you pointed out (I think), the high-speed damping tune does have an effect on more aspects than just the fastest shock movements.

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andrewbikeguide
AndrewR
2 months ago
0

Does Cane Creek recommend setting sag after setting rebound and compression settings? 

SRAM recommends setting sag and then shock settings.

And everyone should always start with low speed rebound (there is a reason that more 'budget' suspension has adjustable low speed rebound over any other adjustments - it is the most important setting to get right).

The ride off a kerb/ ledge test is the easiest way to check low speed rebound.

Ride off the kerb/ low ledge in the standing centred position, the shock should compress and then extend but the bike should not poggo. Adjust for trail conditions and personal preference.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

I always set sag first. 

The thing to remember with Cane Creek shocks is that you have to have HSC/LSC on to properly dial in your low speed settings. If you have zero turns of high speed then you end up in the high speed circuits. So it’s always best here to start with at least two turns of high speed and then set your LSR.

Reply

just6979
Justin White
2 months ago
0

Care to elaborate on the not enough HS damping leading to feeling harsh?

(I have an idea...)

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
+1 Justin White

If you don’t have enough turns of high speed damping those valves open too easily and you’ll be using the high speed circuits prematurely.

I know a few riders with CCDB shocks who actually run the HSR closed - I believe on the recommendation of Steve @ Vorsprung but it’s possible I’m remembering that wrong - because they find their suspension is smoother through the whole stroke (progressive frames). In that event you’re using the low speed circuit more.

Reply

mickeyD
Mickey Denoncourt
2 months ago
+1 Justin White

The people who drive the Canecreek Demo truck recommend people try their HSR closed and tune back from there on progressive frames, especially.   One of the things the Kitsuma architecture was supposed to do was to eliminate the fact that lots of the staff rode their HSR fully closed, I do believe.

Reply

just6979
Justin White
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I'm glad you mentioned Steve, because that's where I got the same info ;-)

And it's why I'm looking to do some shim work on my (already chimeric*) DPX2. I figure a DRL (Digressive Rebound Light) tune isn't quite enough for running 300 psi (of 350 max) with the second-biggest token. Hopefully the LRM (Linear Rebound Medium tune will help activate the LSR circuit more often, so it doesn't feel like the wheel is slamming back into things on repeated small fast hits no matter where the LSR adjuster is.

*(already has an X2 reservoir cap for shock-pump IFP chamber fills instead of nitro, and a Float X IFP with glide ring is on the way)

Reply

velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 months ago
+1 Andrew Major

I was pleased to find Steve's recommendation after bracketing my way to closed HSR, confirmation for what seemed like a weird setup eased my mind.

Does your (2022?) Rifty clear a piggyback? The '23 frame is on my radar and I'd been thinking of selling my CCDBA XV CS on a frame, but as you say - reconfigurable and cheap when in the house already.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
+1 Velocipedestrian

I’m sure mine would clear a piggyback, as the previous gen did, but admittedly I haven’t tried - a friend has my CCDB CS coil and previous gen Rifty now.

I was switching solely to hardtails for personal bikes until I ruptured my Achilles and this Rifty saved the day.

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velocipedestrian
Velocipedestrian
2 months ago
0

Cheers.

Reply

ChazzMichaelMichaels
ChazzMichaelMichaels
2 months ago
0

Somewhat amusingly or tragically I've bought two of these shocks, mainly as a back up when my TTX is being serviced. The first one I had completely rebuilt with the modern replacements. I rode it once. Having no adjustment knobs drives me nuts. I just could not be bothered getting a multi tool out to change something. Normally I will ride a couple hundred metres of trail, adjust something, re-ride, repeat etc, so in theory it shouldn't be the end of the world.

So I then sold that effectively new shock for less than what the rebuild cost.

About a year later I bought another one. It's still in the draw. I need help.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months ago
0

It’s funny - strokes for folks - as I so much prefer tooled adjusters on everything - brakes, forks, shocks. It’s just so much more deliberate making changes.

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babyzhendo
babyzhendo
2 months ago
0

Ooof that's a temping deal on the newer ones. I've got a DPX2 on my Banshee Phantom V3 that I've struggled to dial in (as I have with every DPX2 I've owned), and I'd been wondering about the Inline Air as a possible upgrade...

Reply

hermanasaurusrex@gmail.com
0

First off, I gotta say I love all the articles written on NSMB. Well, not all but most of them, though Andrews are consistently my favorites. His opinions on drivetrains, min maxing, suspension are very interesting and entertaining. 

I don't think I would be alone in requesting an article about your personal bikes. A bike check of sorts, I see your crazy assortment of bikes in what you write. And I would love to get a more in depth look at them and hear what components you ride on your bikes. 

Just a thought

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