CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG
REVIEW

The Camelbak Chase Protector Vest

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Aug 17, 2020
Reading time

This Is Spinal Wrap

Saying that I had an excellent experience with Camelbak's original Chase Bike Vest is an understatement. The product is the hip-pack-killer anytime I'm carrying more than my wallet, emotional support jacket, and some extra gloves. I love how the Chase vest stays put descending, puts my cellphone in the best possible position if I should need it on the solo ride emergency, and holds exactly the right amount of gear - including my 4/3 camera - without getting unwieldy. In fact I've recommended the Chase a number of times to riders looking to take water, tools, and snacks along on their DH bikes .

I know that hip-packs are for everyone, and backpacks are not, and Camelbak's bike vests are an exceptional example of neither. Camelbak quite obviously sees the vest line's potential beyond marathon XC racing and bikes-sans-bottle-mounts because this latest vest option includes a CE Level 2 back protector.

CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (5).JPG

The Chase vest is great for all four seasons. For epic rides I add the included 2L bladder but usually it just holds stuff and I carry water in bottles on my bike.

CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (6).JPG

Chase is easily the most breathable on-my-back pack that I've used. The mesh straps help but credit to Camelbak for thinking about ventilation throughout.

CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (7).JPG

The back protector doesn't add any warmth compared to the original Chase Bike Vest. The system is heavier but also has a much larger volume.

At first, explaining the combination of a hydration vest - popularized by runners and long-distance XC riders - and back protection sounds a bit strange but with familiarization comes infatuation as I usually don't ride with a hydration bladder. I've popped a bladder once falling on my back wearing a pack, and given the awkward shape and rigidity of some of the items I carry - like a camera - the idea of the back protector separating me from my sh*t during a crash is appealing.

Compared to the original Chase Bike Vest, this protective model is more than twice as heavy (780-grams v. 330-grams) empty but it's important to note that doesn't just come down to the back protector. The Protector-Vest has more than double the storage capacity - which is way too much for this layout - and has room for a bladder with an extra 1/2 litre of liquids (2L v 1.5L). It even has a helmet holder and while that's not a feature I'd bother with, it's a great place to store a wet jacket when the tap turns off.

The Protector-Vest is much better laid out for mountain bike gear storage compared to the original Chase, which was re-purposed from Camelbak's running lineup, but I'd go as far as to suggest it has double the volume that it should in terms of being able to load the design with crap. My concern is that, for future products, Camelbak will compromise the best aspects of the vest - airflow and the mesh harness - in order to improve the ergonomics of the Protector Vest when it's loaded. If you need to carry a backpack load of stuff then wear a backpack.

CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

The new vest can carry a 2L bladder and 6L of gear. This is a dangerous combo for the everything-and-the-kitchen-sink packer because the vest format is best with a lightweight load.

CamelBak Chase Vest NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

I wish every pack used mesh straps and had a convenient, built-in, and excellent fitting, front access cellphone pocket. It's never uncomfortable or in the way like an add-on pouch will be.

Thanks to the 3D ventilated mesh harness, the vest is amazing at staying in place in even when using my best dance moves to keep the rubber side down on janky trails. It breathes better than any backpack you've tried. My usual load is either the same as my hip-pack or when I'm carrying my camera or extra water, I'll make sure the majority of my tools are in my frame bag & on my bike. If there's going to be heavy rain I'll also pack a real rain jacket and if there's a solid chance of lighter precipitation my Goretex vest comes along. I'm a notorious over-packer so I have to really stay on top of myself. Last week I pulled five pairs of gloves, two multi-tools, and a full bottle of water out of the Chase. The performance was much improved after.

I wish there was a built-in weatherproof compartment, or that the whole bag was weatherproof, but not if it would have any effect on breath-ability. There is no back pack that breathes as well as the Chase and I'll happily stuff my vulnerable gear in a dry bag for really wet days if that's what it takes to keep it that way.

I'll also make a special mention about the dual-sternum-strap and lack of a waist belt as it's the thing I get most often asked about. I love not having a waist belt, and wouldn't want one on any pack except where they stabilize loads under maximum effort. The Chase stays put beautifully, better than any pack I've used, and a waist belt is absolutely unnecessary.

Between Two Vests

Three pocket jerseys aren't my thing. Merino jerseys sag ridiculously with any amount of weight in them and standard road jerseys that combine stretch and support feel awful as soon as I start getting my sweat on. When it's raining in the summer I'll wear the Chase vest over my Goretex vest. On a warm day, I'll just wear it over a Merino T. It's those crisp days that I'm getting excited for because this season I'll be sporting the Chase Protector Vest over a nearly-new, fairly-old, CoreRat vest that my friend Sarah found in her closet!

Thanks to the Chase vest's birth as a marathon-XC product, with easily accessible snacking and just the right amount of space, it sits perfectly above the Cordura pockets of my CoreRat. Doing short rides without any packs the CoreRat actually has plenty of space to comfortably carry my wallet, phone, and snacks, but even when combined with the Chase vest there are plenty of lightweight things to shove in those pockets so that I don't need to remove my pack to access them.

CamelBak Chase CoreRat Vest NSMB AndrewM (4).JPG

The Chase vest interfaces perfectly with a three-pocket jersey is that's your thing. Personally, I'll only be taking advantage of the cut when wearing my CoreRat vest.

CamelBak Chase CoreRat Vest NSMB AndrewM (1).JPG

I can access all three pockets without removing the Chase Protector Vest. I'll keep extra gloves in there, a mandatory blinky light, or snacks.

CamelBak Chase CoreRat Vest NSMB AndrewM (2).JPG

When it comes time for costume changes the Chase is very quick to adjust. Even when interfaced with thicker garments I had no issue getting a perfect fit.

Whether it's climbing hard out of the saddle or bouncing down grotesque rooted corners, the Chase Protector Vest is splendidly still no matter how much body English I introduce to our relationship. Thankfully I haven't had to use the back protector to date but I'm completely sold on the idea of having the protective barrier between my camera, tools, etc, and me if I do crash on my back. The Chase, with the right load, feels so light on my back that I don't count any extra grams from the protector as a concern.

If you love your hip pack, wear it. If you love your backpack, wear it. If you haven't found an example of either that works great for you then try on a Chase Bike Vest. Having used both models, I'd recommend the fit and features of the Protector version. I am still occasionally wearing a hip pack for very light-load days, especially when it's very warm, because I have the luxury of owning both. Ii I was going to have just one pack for riding then this would be it.

When I found out the vest, including a 2L bladder, is 200 USD it gave me a moment's pause. That seems like a lot of scratch, even with the best-in-class airflow and the back protector. A couple more rides in and I could frankly say that if this went missing tomorrow that I would buy a replacement right away. That's despite owning a few other packs - hip and back - that can do the job.

You can check it out here and if you've tried out a Camelbak vest, love it or hate it, I'd like to read your experiences in the comments below. My brother is already a full-time Chase convert; it's the hip pack and backpack killer and I have a few friends I'm trying to convince to try one out.

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Comments

Masacrejoe
+1 Andrew Major
Michael Klein  - Aug. 17, 2020, 5:15 a.m.

I usually get a sore neck/shoulders when wearing a backpack for several hours even with a good waistbelt. What is your experience regarding this? I would assume all the load is on the shoulders/neck?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Michael Klein
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 6:43 a.m.

With the caveats that I’m on fairly modern geo (76º+ STA) on FS bikes, and I stand a lot on my hardtail (single speed), and I’m religious about not over filling it, I get none of the back discomfort wearing the Chase that I have with a regular pack. My brother, CTK, has had a similar experience.

The Chase fits/loads very different from other packs but I normally get lower back discomfort - although I did have a rotator cuff issue this year - so it’s impossible to say if it would work for you. Really expensive shot in the dark but if you could demo one it might be perfect! Safer bet is probably a good hip pack or hip pack / frame bag combo. 

I will say that, if you’re riding a modern long, low, slack bike and the shoulder/neck pain arrived the same time then your bar is too low. Seeing lots of bikes with the saddle nose massively tilted down (moving weight to hands, arms, shoulders, neck) because the bar is too low and the rider is compensating for other issues. 

Disproportionately short Stack v Reach is present on a lot of bikes. Enough that 50mm rise bars are showing up everywhere. For anyone who is not sure what works for them, a good starting point for bracketing a modern-long FS bike is having the bar and saddle the same height when the seat is up (static).

Reply

Masacrejoe
+1 Andrew Major
Michael Klein  - Aug. 17, 2020, 8:08 a.m.

I ride an Airdrop Edit (FS) and a ‘20 Chromag Rootdown both of wich I would say are pretty low and slack. The bars are a little above saddle height, and the saddle is level, so I think I’m good in that department. I’ve developed a good tuck and roll, when i crash, and consider my backpack (with or without protector) part of my protection, so I’m not really interested in a hip pack. I also frequently carry a small folding saw and a (very) small folding spade, which I would have a hard time fitting into a hip pack. I’m (still) practising not overloading though. 

If you aren’t experiencing further shoulder load with the Chase, I’m inclined to try it out. It looks stupid with the backpack waist belt tightened up like a dress belt anyway.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Michael Klein
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 9:28 a.m.

Yeah, it took me a long time to find a hip pack that works for me and it’s nice having a cooler back but there’s no waist strap as comfortable as the Chase (to me).

One thing that really helped me was moving the tools I rarely use to a little waterproof frame bag that easily seals between bikes. Can’t convince myself to go without them but at least they’re sprung weight that isn’t on my back. 

If I carry my camera and/or Silky I don’t carry a bladder. When I need extra water (FS bike has one bottle) I’m diligent about not over filling the bladder - works great.

I also think the structure provided by the back protector really helps distribute forces/load v. the standard Chase. Was going to get my brother to try it and see if he noticed the same but I started to worry about getting it back!

Reply

cxfahrer
+2 Andrew Major grcgrc
cxfahrer  - Aug. 17, 2020, 9:17 a.m.

No, saddle up the same height as the bar is impossible when 2m tall.

Core training is the cure.

Why is there a certified protector when it does not cover the lower back? I am comparing it to my Evoc vest, which has full protection down to the pelvis.

I would love to have something like the Evoc with room to stash things. It should be a bikepark worthy protector though.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 9:43 a.m.

I don’t understand why it would be impossible? I mean, it may not work for you personally - it may not even be necessary (can you buy a non-custom bike that has a genuinely long reach for your body?) but there are plenty of ways to get the bar up if you want to. I have a couple friends in your height bracket - one yogas, one doesn’t - and at least one of them is running plenty of headset spacers and looking at 50mm rise bars. 

I played with the concept of riders chasing Short Person Fit over at my passion project but it’s not ready for prime time. Just a concept. But more and more riders have bike setups that short folks were running 10-20 years ago because their bikes had to have proportionately long Reach and higher Stack than what taller riders were buying. 

Honestly hadn’t thought about the length of the back protector. It’s long enough to protect me from my own stuff (in the pack) and I feel if I’m rolling or looping out the pack is going to contact the ground first 99/100 times. Then again, I’ve never gone out looking for a back protector - it’s just a feature that works well for me in this instance & has the added bonus of some peace of mind.

Camelbak does full length packs with back protection so maybe that would work for you? I love the vests very un-pack-like ability To always stay in place during aggressive efforts.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 9:49 a.m.

Here’s a bar height example from Pistons & Pivots:

I’m not a fan of all the headset spacers (which shorten Reach quite a bit and make at least some fork manufacturers nervous) and I wanted to write more on the subject so I’m currently riding a 76mm/3” riser bar from ProTaper. My bike grew a decent amount (same stem length) slamming the stem and getting all the rise out of the bar.

---

*Edit - Here are a few shots of the ProTaper bar. 

Reply

cxfahrer
+1 grcgrc
cxfahrer  - Aug. 17, 2020, 12:24 p.m.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/n18GUVFrWGTSLzQ96

Thanks but no! I am completely happy with the setup of my stock XXL Capra. It has the same stack as my hardtail, the bar is about 15cm below the saddle. Works perfect for me, even on really steep trails, but also cruising on flat doubletracks

I think it makes sense to protect your back against the stuff in the backpack (or hip pack). But when falling on my back I want all my spine protected, so I would prefer something like the Evoc but with pockets.

Masacrejoe
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
Michael Klein  - Aug. 17, 2020, 10:47 p.m.

Cool bars. They look like something Marlon Brando would be riding.

Endur-Bro
+1 Andrew Major
Endur-Bro  - Aug. 17, 2020, 12:50 p.m.

Looks like the Patagonia trail runner backpacks. 

Was expecting this to be way worse than it is. 

I feel USWE is the best pack style. They just need to get better build quality.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Endur-Bro
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 2:39 p.m.

USWE was my gateway to thinking about packs differently and it works well - again with a limited load - and I used it until I tried the Chase vest (and found hip packs that work). But, for me the Chase, and particularly the Chase Protector, is better in every metric - fit, stay-put-ed-ness, airflow/breathability, materials and manufacturing.

If they were equal the Chase would still have the slight leg up with the front cellphone pocket. That’s not to say that USWE doesn’t have amazing potential if they produce a next gen product.

Reply

DanL
+1 Andrew Major
DanL  - Aug. 17, 2020, 5:56 p.m.

It's funny, I always thought the back and forth about whether a frame has space for a bottle cage was not a problem that was going rear it's head for me.

But there are now so many great options for stashing tools into a bike which are now made useless for me as I still have to carry a damn bottle on me. And there's no way I'll stick a bottle

So in order of size I've got a Dakine Hotlaps, a USWE airborne3 , a Mission Acre and an EVOC Fr Trail. They all excel at what I need them to do but I'm looking enviously at bottle cages and wistfully at gear stashes as no matter what I do right now, I'm still carrying water on me. This chase vest looks excellent but I think I'm chasing a unicorn.

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AndrewMajor
+1 DanL
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 7:15 p.m.

I have room for one tall bottle on the Marin and 2x bottles on the Walt and prefer to carry water on the bike much of the year. Certainly in the nastiest winter rides bottles get fairly undrinkable fast so I’ll opt for a bladder. This time of year if it’s a long/hot ride I’ll carry ~ 1L in a bladder or soft bottle on either bike for long rides (drink a lot of water riding SS).

I have a collection of hip and backpacks and this version of the Chase is the first true ‘unicorn’ I’ve owned. Not saying you wouldn’t see me wearing my PR Dumpling on a short ride where I just need extra gloves/phone, but if all my gear was eaten by moths I would just buy this one bag to replace it.

Reply

DanL
+1 Andrew Major
DanL  - Aug. 17, 2020, 8:58 p.m.

That's high praise indeed - there's a special point in the matrix where the USWE and the Mission Acre meet and I haven't found it yet. I think I need to retrain myself to accept a pack on slightly longer rides.

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AndrewMajor
+1 DanL
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 10:16 p.m.

I used my Acre bag a tonne these past couple years hiking with my daughter. It's perfect for keeping snacks, clothes, camera all dry. I did ride with it a few times but it's a lot hotter than the Chase vest when it isn't raining and it certainly doesn't stay-in-place the same in any conditions. 

When I tested the V.1 chase I really, really, wished there was a waterproof version but now I'm not so certain. I put the stuff that matters in dry bags inside the pack, the light weight materials don't really soak up water (it's not like the bag fills up or anything) and it breathes so much better any time it matters that I don't know if, for mountain biking, a weatherproof bag matters to me. Commuting? Definitely. 

Also - a future reviews/editorials pending - I'm in a bit different place with rain gear these days. I'm testing the best jacket I've ever worn (Giro Neoshell) that's basically an ultra-comfy softshell that's seam taped. It's not a 7Mesh Guardian on the pure rainproofedness scale but it really makes up for it - even commuting. Can't wait for Fall. Also, I'm fully on the train of wearing pants when it's decently raining/wet but haven't been wearing rainpants for months - I guess to me the Acre pack falls into the same category. Hope that makes sense!

Endur-Bro
+2 Andrew Major DanL
Endur-Bro  - Aug. 18, 2020, 10:13 a.m.

I think I have a Dakine Hot Laps Fanny too. I can fit a bottle in the side holster and another small bottle in the actual pack itself. I’m going to get a foldable water bottle for inside so that once it’s finished it’ll take up less room. 

Most of my riding is a climb up to trails so I can drink the bottle then transfer water to the outer bottle near the top.

Reply

DanL
+2 Andrew Major Endur-Bro
DanL  - Aug. 18, 2020, 3:46 p.m.

That's basically my most used setup currently with a 500ml nalgene in the side holster. It irks me having my tools/pump jangle around inside but I can fit all the things I need for a standard ride in it.

Those exterior carabiner attach points on the outside are also good for strapping elbow pads to and the chinguard from my Switchblade (which is in a weird gray usage area as well now)

Reply

Endur-Bro
+1 Andrew Major
Endur-Bro  - Aug. 19, 2020, 6:56 a.m.

On my Chromag I’ll strap the pump to the bottle cage and put a bottle in there. On the G16 everything either ends up in my Fanny or I’m forced to use a backpack like sort of untrendy peasant. 

I’m not really into threading my steer tubes for a OneUp tool at this point.

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 24, 2020, 5:50 p.m.

'Untrendy Peasant' is definitely my style for most things in life...

slimshady76
+2 Andrew Major Michael Klein
Luix  - Aug. 17, 2020, 6:55 p.m.

Hey Drew, here comes the insidious question: why the heck do you carry a helluva backpack if you are going to strap the water to the frame????

My reasoning for wearing a non minimalist backpack is to use the water bladder as a sort of cushion when things don't go right, and also to carry my tools and stuff (I'm kind of a prepper biker, the obvious mechanic of my crew). This also lightens the bike and allows me to better handle it when stuff gets rowdy. A well distributed load in a tightly packed backpack trumps any water bottle in my book, and I might be evangelizing here, but splitting the load between the rider and the bike on anything but bikepacking really puzzles me...

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Luix Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 7:28 p.m.

I appreciate the question as I’ve been asked a number of time IRL. I have bottle(s) on my frames (though I often carry extra water), tools on my frames in my easily transferred dry bag, and my PR Dumpling happily holds wallet/phone/keys/extra gloves/ESJ, why a pack?

A few reasons. I often pack a 4/3 camera, but even when I don’t I like to bring an extra shirt, some small first aid stuff, extra gloves, a light if I’m planing to finish near dusk, my GoreTex vest if there’s a risk of decent precipitation, and a snack. It all fits in my hip pack (even the camera) but weight/comfort wise it disappears in the Chase.

Also, if I want to detour home from work via Fromme I need to pack a lunch to work and my (daughter’s - totally stole it) lunch box on the way home and spare clothes and with the Chase that’s comfortably doable.

Lastly, even when it’s ~ empty and my little hip pack is screaming for a ride, if it’s a solo pedal I really, really like the cellphone access. Hope for the best; plan for the worst - in this case the easiest access to a phone.

Reply

slimshady76
+2 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman
Luix  - Aug. 18, 2020, 6:12 a.m.

Thanks for the thorough explanation. I understand our base circumstances are way different, you ride a lot more often and on several bikes, while I ride my only bike once or twice a week, so it's easier to have everything on hand and always in the same backpack.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Andrew Major
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 17, 2020, 8:53 p.m.

I’m tempted to get one for the fall season where layers need to be stashed. I haven’t ridden with a pack in few years. I experimented with a hydration bum bag but I hated the weight there. And the Palos was a poor attempt too. I have a really small Dakine unit that fits bug dope, wallet and phone and few extra bits of bike parts and maybe some gel cubes. Longer rides I’ll go with the Out There bum bag and a water filter. I went almost three hours on Saturday with one small bottle and my filter. Might not work in the desert but in the land of lakes and creeks it’s good. I have a Salomon running pack for hiking which is pretty good but it has way too many elastic cords and the front pockets loose things unless you put it in the zippered parts. This Camelbak might be a better hiking and biking pack. Have you hiked with it at all Andrew?

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Andy Eunson
Andrew Major  - Aug. 17, 2020, 10:17 p.m.

The only hiking I've worn it for is hike-a-biking and I've done that a lot. For pure hiking with The Clairebarian, I usually grab my Acre pack as it's always ready to go with snacks and clothes. It's an interesting question; I should definitely try it.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+2 Andrew Major Andy Eunson
Velocipedestrian  - Aug. 17, 2020, 11:47 p.m.

Interested, kinda. I was the kitchen sinker, so went to a bum bag to shrink the load and keep the bag away from the back of my helmet. Couple of years with the Palos (agree, not a great design) and I've switched to a Skyline LR... It's kind of the opposite approach to the Chase vest, a bigger bum bag with shoulder straps.

I'd thought the lower back pain I was getting the day after riding was my posture, but it vanished when I switched bags. 

I seem to remember a less than stellar review of the Skyline here, was it yours, Andrew? I'd like to hear some comparison if it was.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 18, 2020, 6:58 a.m.

I’ve tested a Camelbak Mule LR pack - and owned a first gen LR pack years ago. They ~ worked for me when my bikes were much smaller although I remember there was definitely more stopping to stretch my back than there is now. 

Interestingly, most folks I know have ditched LR packs in conjunction with going long/low/slack (even ones whose bars are the same height as their saddle).

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velocipedestrian
+1 Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - Aug. 18, 2020, 8:06 p.m.

Ah, the bike could be a factor then. 450mm was a long large in 2013, not so much now.

Cheers.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 24, 2020, 5:53 p.m.

Yeah, most larges now are coming in closer to 480mm Reach (nice to see lots of XL bikes in 2021 are closer to 515mm) and more importantly the Stack heights are coming up to better match that dimension - you don't need 1000x headset spacers. 

Also, the standard ~78° STA (which varies a lot bike to bike still depending on the actual STA and your inseam) is A LOT steeper than what anyone was doing in 2013 which certainly changes seated-position.

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olaa
+1 Andrew Major
olaa  - Aug. 18, 2020, 4:33 a.m.

Thank you for that review! Being firmly in the "bum-bags are not comfortable" group of people I have been looking for a new backpack for a while and could never make a decision on one... Well now this one is ordered! 

Also, ended up clicking on a link to Meatengines. Good fun and a great way to spend an hour of the workday :)

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 18, 2020, 6:59 a.m.

Cheers, truly hope it’s awesome for you. Do report back.

Thanks, that stiff is all a bit unpolished, but I really enjoy that (some) folks enjoy it!

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olaa
+1 Andrew Major
olaa  - Aug. 26, 2020, 1:19 a.m.

Got to try it out for a 3 hr ride yesterday, and it was really comfortable! Also fits a surprising amount of gear without feeling bulky at all. Great to have a front pocket to stash the sunglasses in on the climbs, love that!

It also got crash-tested, and passed with flying colours. Just a small crash, but having a backpack makes the tuck-and-roll much better :)

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 26, 2020, 11:43 p.m.

Cool; stoked it's working well for you!

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truckymctruckerton
+1 Andrew Major
truckymctruckerton  - Aug. 18, 2020, 7:39 a.m.

Whoa whoa,... Core Rat is back??? Like the original Core Rat Angie Wear? Please tell me more!

D

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 18, 2020, 7:46 a.m.

Nothing so universally cool I’m afraid, this was a hand-me-down from an awesome friend who knew how much I lament that passing of my own vest a few years back (finally wore it out).

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GreyHead
+1 Andrew Major
GreyHead  - Aug. 18, 2020, 9:53 a.m.

Hey Andrew,  

great review.  after moving from a pack to a hip belt, I still miss the "protection" that landing on the pack might offer, but enjoy the airflow over my back...   How big is the Phone pocket?  Could it fit an XL Iphone   or Samsung S10+? 

Thanks!

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 18, 2020, 10:21 a.m.

Nothing is as cool on the back as no pack, followed closely by a good hip pack. Wore the vest riding this morning as I was carrying my camera but otherwise it’s been so hot the last couple days the hip pack would have been pulled on for my short little morning rip.

Well, that and it was a solo ride. Love having that phone access. To answer your question it totally swallows my iPhone so I’m certain it fits those larger phones.

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velocipedestrian
+1 Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - Aug. 18, 2020, 8:10 p.m.

I killed my phone two weeks ago (in my thigh pocket, Troy Lee moto) and am now nervous of keeping it anywhere it might get crashed on... Have moved it into the pack, but now I'm nervous of not being able to reach it when injured.

I guess I don't generally land on my chest/shoulder, do you lot?

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Aug. 19, 2020, 12:14 a.m.

I know plenty of people who have written off phones in their shorts pockets and I guess anything is possible. On the chest it's pretty well protected so by my body - not something I have any concern about. I mean, it's fully believable that an infinite number of monkeys crashing an infinite number of times I might get the bullet-in-the-bible western effect of having my phone deflect a sharp stick?!

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oldmanbike
+1 Andrew Major
OldManBike  - Aug. 19, 2020, 9:08 a.m.

Another nice review. Any insight on tall-person fit? The fact that it's one size only makes me wonder if it will sit too high.

I've hated the look of most Camelbak packs over the years because of their flashing-billboard branding, so the understated look of this is a welcome change.

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AndrewMajor
+1 OldManBike
Andrew Major  - Aug. 19, 2020, 9:54 a.m.

Cheers!

Usually I’m very cautious talking about tall-people fit. I’m 5’9” and often see 6’2” people telling 6’6” people what’s what.

In this case, I rode last night with a buddy who is 6’5”/6’6” (tall enough to make Guerrilla Grav’s biggest bike look like they should offer another size) and he was using the regular/original Chase Bike Vest and even with gear, chin bar, water, and battery he was really comfortable. He’s super eager to try the Protector Vest so at some point I’ll loan to him and report back.

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oldmanbike
+1 Andrew Major
OldManBike  - Aug. 19, 2020, 9:59 a.m.

That's helpful, thanks.

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andy-eunson
+1 Andrew Major
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 20, 2020, 8:51 a.m.

So I can’t see this pack on the Canadian Camelbak site. Are they available up here yet?

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AndrewMajor
+1 Andy Eunson
Andrew Major  - Aug. 20, 2020, 8:56 a.m.

My understanding is yes, but it may be a question for your preferred local shop.

I don’t know of any shops stocking Chase Protector. Honestly see both shop folks and riders having a struggle wrapping their head around the product if they don’t try it.

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