Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM
EDITORIAL

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Story

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major (unless noted)
Date May 9, 2018

Don't Buy A Dumpster Fire

I had no impetus to write a Spring Service article this year. I covered all the basics last year prepping our Marin Hawkhill for test and the link to Wrench Now, Ride Later is right here. Then I'm pedaling up a popular local singletrack climb and from a switchback below I overhear this boorish conversation:

Rider 1: "...oh yeah, my bike is a roached piece of sh*t. I need to sell this thing a-sap."

Rider 2: "How much you figure?"

Rider 1: "About two grand."

Rider 2: "Two grand to fix it?"

Rider 1: "Ha, no it's right f**ked. Probably twice that to make it good. I figure I'll get two grand selling it."

Rider 2: "Who's going to buy that sh*tbox for two grand?"

Rider 1: "I don't know. Someone who doesn't know any better. It's carbon!"

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Wrenching on bikes is not a Red Seal trade in Canada. Anyone can claim to be a bike mechanic. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Phone a friend, hit social media, or post in a forum. It's not hard to get local go/no-go recommendations. 

I've unfortunately come across lots of ripped off riders over my years working in shops; 

  • Five-year-old bikes that had 'yearly tune-ups' but had never had the brakes bled or suspension serviced
  • Hard to see frame cracks that are always present on certain models if you know where to look. 
  • High-end hubs with the internals ridden to dust. 
  • Seized bearings. 
  • Blown dropper posts that aren't serviceable. 
  • Drivetrains that shift fine in a flat parking lot but skip hard under climbing loads. 

I could go on for days.

It's almost always a newer rider trying to upgrade their 'trying out mountain biking' rig to the highest end bike they can stretch their budget around and I'm sorry to say I've seen multiple used bikes where, with the labour factored in, the purchase price combined with the repair cost added up to more than buying a better bike brand new. 

It's a sad day telling someone who's stoked on mountain biking that they would have been better lighting their cash on fire. 

The Big Jobs

The sequence is often the same. Fork seals start leaking so it gets removed to be serviced. Oh, the headset bearings barely turn. Wow, this fork is in rough shape - probably a great idea to have shock serviced too. Remove shock. Suspension bearing pivots are so seized that the rear end remains in place with the shock removed. 

This could easily represent a cool grand, and sometimes much more, on top of the purchase price of a jalopy. That's just to get everything back to stock. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Disassembling the bike aside, pressing in fresh bearings is a quick job with the right tools. Except when it isn't... Photo: Essential Cycles

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

...like when the originals are seized. Jess had to soak these beauties in penetrating oil for a day before applying the elbow grease. Photo: EC

Straight up, one of the biggest performance upgrades a rider can make is servicing the stuff that's already on their bike. Put another way, when the seals are so cooked that your fork doesn't return to full travel there's a sh*t ton of friction happening. I'm not innocent either. The last time Zac changed the seals in the Manitou Mattoc Pro fork I reviewed, it was so smooth I had to add 20psi to the main air chamber and my hands are still loving the improved performance in chatter. 

Beyond a stock rebuild, there are also, of course, a plethora of upgrades available for stock suspension products from the likes of PUSH Industries and Avalanche Suspension. Many shocks and forks, an excellent example being Ohlins, can also be re-valved for rider weight. A new high-performance shock or fork is really expensive but if the chassis is still good there are often less expensive ways to maximize performance. That's factoring the cost of keeping the used product and any upgrades against selling the used product and buying a new replacement. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Tools and experience trump location when it comes to service businesses. Zac at Smithtech can often be found working out of his van. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

There's a big difference between a quick seal swap with some oil in the lowers and a full teardown like Alex at SuspensionWerx is putting into this DVO Diamond. 

Servicing suspension is beneficial both as preventive maintenance and for performance gains. And yet a lot of folks never even change the oil in their fork lowers, which can be as little as 15ml per side. The fork and shock are two of the most expensive parts of a bike to maintain. They're also icebergs when it comes to the damage that can occur if they're ridden for hundreds of hours beyond their service intervals. 


Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Used Cane Creek DB coil shock rebuilt in Metric sizing by SuspensionWerx.  

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Bladder add-on for the reservoir...

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

...which improves initialization on many bikes.

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Need a new shaft anyways, might as well go TiNi. 

There are a fair number of riders who service their own forks, and even some who service their own shocks. But, I would still put down cash that the vast majority of used bikes are due for a suspension service. It's always best practice to drop the rear wheel, remove the shock, and cycle the back end. If it doesn't move smoothly then it's time for a bearing job and chances are that's just the canary in the coal mine. 

The Small Jobs

The swingarm moves smoothly, suspension service has been taken into account, the drivetrain is in good shape, the wheels have been serviced, and the dropper post is fresh so now it's just the nickel-and-dime repairs to factor in. This is the stuff that's relatively cheap to tackle if a rider is doing it at home but can easily consume a couple hundred bucks if a shop is booking it in. 

It seems the vast majority of riders I know are running tubeless these days and for those riders, I'd wager on any given day 60% of them are riding with dried up sealant in their tires. A pint of Stan's sealant is 17 USD and for those maintaining a few bikes, a Quart is 28 USD or 39 USD for the Race version. If tires need to be replaced as well this can easily jump into a 'big job'. Good rubber is not cheap and cheap rubber is not good. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Replacing the sealant and (sometimes) rim tape/strip, in a tubeless setup is relatively cheap. But if it hasn't been done it'll cost ya. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

Similarly, just because the brakes feel good when the bike is sitting doesn't mean the fluid isn't due for a bleed. 

It's also always best practice to bleed brakes on a new-to-you bike. I can't recall having worked on a used purchase where the brake fluid didn't come out the same color as my coffee. For anyone who owns a kit, a brake bleed is a cheap and easy job with the notable exception of when it isn't. 

I've seen a lot of used bikes with evaporated brake pads or the cheapest sh*t replacement brake pads installed and it's also not uncommon to see rotors worn down past the manufacturer's recommended minimum thickness. Suddenly a small job is over the tap-limit on the credit card machine regardless of who's doing the labor. 

Buying Used

There are great deals on great bikes to be had on the used market. Rider's flip bikes in great shape for all sorts of reasons from changes in the riding they're doing to that dread illness upgradeitus. Sometimes a rig that needs a lot of work can be a great value. If it's cheap enough and has no proprietary parts. But, every time I see some asshole trying to sell their well-ravaged handlebar instead of recycling it I'm reminded it's a buyer beware world. 

Buyer Beware - A Spring Service Article AndrewM

A sticker can just be a sticker. It can also be covering a scratch, dent, or even a crack. 

The thing is, used bikes have been a buyers market for years. Just remember that 'Mechanic owned' and 'recently serviced' mean sweet-all. It's like paying a premium for Miranda Miller's used bike because it's 'lady ridden'. 

With rare exceptions, it will require minimal effort for a seller to get receipts showing when and who did that 'recent' service work they're advertising and asking the seller to take required service into account when discussing price is totally legit. 

spring service

Obsession: James and Cam, now the O/O of The Inside Line service shop in Calgary, working through the night seeing what just a few days of wet riding can do to a bike at BCBR

I smile and say hello as I roll past the twosome and they reply in kind. I can't help but notice that the "roach" is actually one of the best 6+6 bikes ever made with a top-end build and unfashionable slightly-smaller-than-27" wheels. 

Even factoring in the $2000 cost of keeping the bike, as long as the frame, suspension, and wheels aren't fully trashed the cost of getting it fully serviced is still probably half the price of the current replacement with a similar trim and, wheel size aside, it's questionable if the four years newer bike is actually better. 

I resist the urge for a closer look but spare a moment to think about the next owner. I wonder if it will prove a money pit or a smart value buy for a top-end machine?

Comments

cooperquinn
+4 AlanB Andrew Major Mammal MTBrent
Cooper Quinn  - May 8, 2018, 11:12 p.m.

My bike is not for sale. 

But the overwhelming guilt I'm feeling about the current state of my dampers after reading this is all consuming. 

I'M SO SORRY. I WILL CALL SUSPENSIONWERX TOMORROW I PROMISE. 

James can then tell me how many Hail Marys are required to fully repent.

Reply

craw
+1 Andrew Major
Cr4w  - May 9, 2018, 6:41 a.m.

You're in so much trouble.

Reply

Cheez1ts
0
Garrett Thibault  - May 9, 2018, 12:06 a.m.

I paid to have my rear brake bled when I was on a long road trip recently and didn’t have a bleed kit with me. My XT was still doing the “wandering bite point” (as it was called in the comments section of the foxy review), so I bled it again when I got home. I flushed out a full line’s worth of grey oil. Either the shop that bled them used cheap grey mineral oil and filled the lines with about as much air as they had before, or my brakes weren’t bled. 

I should have done my spring cleaning before I hit the road. I had dropped a coil spring and an open-bath Avalanche damping cartridge in my Pike and said “nice, my bike is now super low maintenance”. I forgot about the other parts.

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AndrewMajor
+3 AlanB Endur-Bro Mammal
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 1:06 a.m.

Did the brake fluid smell of lavender?!

If I had a penny from everytime I opened a brake to “its the same as the mineral oil London Drugs sells right?!”

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mammal
0
Mammal  - May 9, 2018, 7:07 a.m.

Actually? That's astoundingly horrible.

Reply

slimshady76
+5 Tim Coleman Garrett Thibault Jerry Willows Endur-Bro FlipSide
Luix  - May 9, 2018, 5:45 a.m.

Your shop might have given those brakes the bleed of their lifetime, but it's Shimano to blame for the wandering bite point. They don't anodize the inner side of the MC after machining it, and the piston ends up eroding the surface and preventing the seals from doing their work. The grey fluid coming out with your bleed confirms this. Also, the ceramic pistons on the XT and above calipers tend to develop micro-cracks which suck air in and -once they grow big enough- let oil out, contaminating the pads. 

The cure is either warranty them, or -depending on whether you get dark oil out of a bleed or not- a new set of brake levers, new calipers (some folks are successfully running "Shiguras" by mating Magura calipers to their Shimano levers) or switching brands entirely. Both of the issues I described above are  well known and widely documented online, for every Shimano brake above the Deore product line.

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rvoi
0
rvoi  - May 9, 2018, 6:59 a.m.

Where did the assumption that mechanics are the most conscientious owners originate? Are there any bits of actual data to support this? I would guess ads that use that line only attract novices whether it is cars, trucks, boats or mountain bikes.

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aj@nsmb.com
+2 rvoi Mammal
AJ Barlas  - May 9, 2018, 7:19 a.m.

True. Personally, when working as a wrench my bikes were in the worst state they had ever been. Not many people want to do more "work" when the day is done and rather look forward to a break.

Reply

mammal
+2 rvoi AJ Barlas
Mammal  - May 9, 2018, 7:33 a.m.

Exactly. It appeals to people who don't work on things themselves. "If they know how, they must perform regular maintenance just for the fun of it". They don't consider the fact the "mechanics" are lazy humans too.

Reply

mammal
+1 Andrew Major
Mammal  - May 9, 2018, 7:17 a.m.

This is a great article, and great resource for less experiences folks in the used market.

I've sold my share of used bikes, but I'm usually known for posting so much information in my ads that people probably don't even read it all. If I've disclaimed absolutely everything, then at least I can feel morally satisfied with the sale. 

Currently selling a "classic" Chromag hard tail, and the first thing I listed was fork service history, and the fact that it needs seals ASAP. For the record, I also bled the brakes, put in fresh pads and fresh headset bearings, and it's got brand new quality rubber (tubeless WITH new sealant).  The guy who's picking it up will be either be super pleased, or be completely oblivious to the quality he received. Either way that's a win.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Mammal
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 1:59 p.m.

Thanks!

If "classic" means 1-1/8" headtube then one thing to note for a buyer concerned about future fork compatibility (since the number of good 1-1/8" forks in the buy-and-sells are really drying up) is that X-Fusion makes an awesome replacement option in their Velvet RL2. 

Good midstroke support, 15mm or QR axle, and really easy internal travel adjustment with cheap clip-on spacers: 80 / 100 / 120 / 140mm travel.

Reply

hbelly13
+1 Mammal
Raymond Epstein  - May 9, 2018, 7:38 a.m.

There are fantastic deals to be found used or OEM take-offs. However you really need to A. know what you are looking at,  B. do your research regarding value thoroughly and C. not be in a hurry. Few are willing to do this. To illustrate, I plan to purchase "new" brakes prior to a bike trip at the end of the summer. I know exactly what I want and what the average prices are across the internet. I have had several come available, but I know I can do better on price and I am not worried about set up as I can do it myself. As noted, I am in no real hurry. I believe the same approach can be employed on entire bikes as well, but it requires more time, eye for detail and willingness to accept issues that may arise.

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JBV
+2 FlipSide Andrew Major
James Vasilyev  - May 9, 2018, 8:01 a.m.

the flipside to this article is those guys who have sold awesome bikes (even hard used bikes) in great shape for peanuts. those who've bought my few old mtn bikes got a great deal on great bikes.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 8:20 a.m.

No doubt. As I said, it’s been a buyers market for used bikes for years as long as you know what you’re looking at. 

There are some key bikes too that really hold their own even years later. I’m thinking of the 2009 Specialized Enduro (as long as it doesn’t have the Specialized Future-Crap shock/fork), any year of Trek Remedy (as long as they have a 36 / Lyrik /equivalent up front), 2010 Giant Reign X...

The list could probably go on forever but those are bikes that immediately jump to mind. 

Oh, let’s not forget the 2013 Specialized Enduro (26”). Such an awesome riding bike.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Mammal
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 2:04 p.m.

I'm going to add the classic faux-bar Cove Hustler to this list as well. Shim-in a 27.2 dropper post, pop-on a used coil shock (Rebuilt CCDB, DHX 5.0, RC4) and shred. 

Long term I'd be tempted to install a 1-1/8" X-Fusion Streat RL2 (27.5") fork with a 26+ Maxxis 3c front tire for a wicked sleeper bike.

Reply

brad-sedola
0
Brad Sedola  - May 9, 2018, 8:36 a.m.

I fell in that hole once.

1999 bought a mechanic owned 1997 Kona King Kikapu frame. Mechanic caught me browsing in the store and offered up his frame. This shop being 3 hours drive from where I live, I dropped my old broken Kona Sex Two to return a week later to excitedly pick up my new bike. Brought it home, inspected bike, cracked seatstay. Furious, I started the 6 hour round trip to deal with it where I was pretty much kicked out of the shop by the owner. Was a "private deal" according to him.

Never dealt with that store ever again. Nor that mechanic. Buyer beware.

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AlanB
0
AlanB  - May 9, 2018, 9:13 a.m.

One of the best tips for newbs is to volunteer at a local gear swap event. Talk to other volunteers before opening your wallet for the "lightly ridden" bike. They'll tell you whether it's a deal or a disaster.

Reply

IslandLife
+2 Andrew Major Cooper Quinn
IslandLife  - May 9, 2018, 9:50 a.m.

Getting back into riding again after an almost 10 year hiatus... I was looking over the used bike market pretty hard but realized I just didn't know enough about the current crop of bikes or the tech involved to ensure I didn't end up with a lemon.

Instead, since I was buying over the winter I found a new, last-years model of a great bike that was on an extra "Black Friday/Christmas" sale.  Lots of great deals to be found during the winter if you're not to picky.

Always enjoyed wrenching on my own bikes back in the day and am now slowing building up my tool kit and learning about my bike.  These days with Youtube, most of the service items can be done yourself fairly easily as long as you take it slow and have the right tools.

Hope to be able to sell this well maintained bike in a year or two and this time around, be well equipped to purchase a used (year or two old) upgrade.

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alexdi
0
Alex D  - May 9, 2018, 10:45 a.m.

I buy and sell bikes frequently, but this is why I don't do it with mountain bikes. Between suspension, droppers, and hydraulic brakes, there's too much to go wrong that's expensive to fix. And people beat on them! It's intrinsic to the sport. I'd rather resell modestly-built parts that were used on paths than more sturdy stuff that was sessioned every weekend.  

Last bike I bought was a rigid 700c disc Charge with Avid hydraulics. I knew the brakes were badly engineered from the outset. What I didn't know is that the owner had 'maintained' them by filling them with mineral oil. That's not something you come back from in the cost envelope of a bike worth under $400 at resale. I ended up binning everything but the rotors.  

Another point to reemphasize is that not everyone's figured out how to make a durable carbon frame, and frame warranties only apply to the original purchaser. You get an 8K bike for 4K; great. But if a crack arises from a manufacturing defect (or just an underengineered part), you could be on the hook for a mid-4-figure replacement.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Alex D
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 11:17 a.m.

Growing from your great point re. warranty:

1) Frames with rare or proprietary parts will make it extra expensive to transfer parts to another brand. Seat post, headset, wheels, hubs, BB  - lots of things that can limit swappability and therefore lock-in to an expensive replacement. Some companies are also notorious for not stocking spare frame parts (carbon chainstays seem to be particularly irksome).

2) Many, many times I’ve seen cracked older frames where there is essentially zero transferability of parts to a new frame which then means trying to part out and start over or getting back into the used pool for a compatible frame.

Some frames (like the Remedy I mentioned) have great reputations for durability - which isn’t to say that none ever break. Others are known for near 100% failure rates - research!

Reply

Bagheera
0
Bagheera  - May 9, 2018, 12:20 p.m.

Yep. Question: How do you phrase your research question? "Broken XYZ"? "XYZ frame failure"? I'm in the process of looking for a new bike and also looking at some older models.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 2:13 p.m.

If you mean in a google/forum search then the issue is that frames break in all different places.

The most common spots for suspension frames to crack are the seat-tube/top-tube weld, the shock mounts, the lower linkage hard points on the main triangle on short link bikes (like vpp, DW, or Maestro), and the chainstays on Horst link bikes. 

For example if a (relatively recent) used Specialized or Rocky Mountain is going to be cracked then the odds are it will be the chainstay but if a used Santa Cruz is going to be cracked it is most likely the lower link bearing journal on the mainframe. 

Aluminum frames it's often easier to find cracks since 99% of the time they happen on welds and the frames are more likely to show damage elsewhere (e.g. dent that leads to crack on aluminum).

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Bagheera
0
Bagheera  - May 10, 2018, 12:28 a.m.

Thanks for the reply here and below. My question was more in the vein of your answer below. If there are models that are known to fail, how do you learn about them? I.e. the owner of a LBS recently claimed that pre-2018 Capras (and YT frames in general) were prone to crack. My internet search didn't yield all that much info on that.

Another thing is warranty. Not applicable when you buy used, but when you buy new (even a model several years old). I have had several frames warrantied after 4 years or so, so I'm kind of concerned when I see a company offering only a 2 year-warranty.

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andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - May 9, 2018, 2:19 p.m.

Further on that point, aluminum can be no better. One thing I find truly amazing is the old Klein’s I see for sale on a certain 90’s mountain bike site. How the hell can one still be riding one of those crack fests. I had three in one season and sold that third one soon after I got it. The point is I suppose is that some used bikes are barely ridden. Those are the ones to find if the tech isn’t too out of date. By the way if you’re interested I have this sweet cross bike...

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 Jimothy.benson rvoi
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 2:51 p.m.

It's like the old saying goes: "If in doubt, new or used, buy a steel Honzo."

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clarkee
0
clarkee  - May 9, 2018, 11:29 p.m.

I don’t try as I might my mk 1 banshee paradox seems to be built strong enough to overcome work hardening

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mammal
0
Mammal  - May 10, 2018, 1:31 p.m.

With Banshees you can probably add a few years to the expected life cycle.  I know a few dudes that can't justify buying a new bike because their 2013 Runes still kill it, and are built like sherman tanks.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - May 10, 2018, 4:39 p.m.

So help me out here - Rune and Spitfire both really fun - capable - bikes that climb well even with portly builds.

Phantom is okay at best - no Process 111 - and Prime seemed a bit dated so given that I mainly ride 29’ers the brand hasn’t been on my radar.

I hear they cut a bunch of weight out of the frames and did some other updates - yeah okay.

The other day I’m on their site - “Why The F*** Is No One Talking About The Updated Prime?!?!?!

Swappable short or long wheel base options - and the long is right in my sweet spot - and both Boost and Non-Boost dropout options. Run any shock. Geo looks perfect for a 140/130mm 29’er... INA Bearings!

Okay so some people aren’t interested because of the lack of water bottle... okay so the raw colour should have a black accent instead of red... but seriously - why don’t I see these bikes around?

shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - May 11, 2018, 10:13 a.m.

Im guessing you don't see Banshees around, because they dont have a dealer in the Lower Mainland?  Even the dealer they show in Kelowna seems to be shut down.  Im not aware of any shops that carry them.  You cannot buy them online, but have to contact one of their dealers (which may or may not be in your area).

mammal
+1 Andrew Major
Mammal  - May 13, 2018, 8:52 a.m.

Sorry Andrew, I didn't see this originally.  Interesting about the Prime, that does look pretty sweet.  Probably little hype for the reason that Shoreboy states.

I've never had a good handle on who's distributed them over the years, but it seemed like around '13/'14, 50% of my riding circle bought Runes, and most of those bikes are still around. Seems like a pretty good track record to me. 

If you were interested in availability, maybe contact Mr. SmithTech. His buddy bought a fresh Rune about a year and a half ago, and I'm pretty sure it was through Zac in some shape or form... Just a thought. I'm doing Squamish laps with him today, I'll try to remember to ask if he has a connection.

skooks
+1 Andrew Major
Skooks  - May 9, 2018, 11:42 a.m.

I always buy my bikes used and it has worked out well for me. It helps that I do all of my own mech work and am good at shopping for deals. I love Andrews comment that the best performance upgrade you can get is to service the parts already on your bike. If you have a bike that is basically sound and works well for you, why buy a new one?

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riley
0
Riley  - May 9, 2018, 12:38 p.m.

"Hard to see frame cracks that are always present on certain models if you know where to look. "

Could you give some examples please?

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 2:47 p.m.

Ha! I already have to wear a disguise in public and dive into the bushes everytime someone rides by in a LIV Bikes jersey AND I have nightmares about German-speaking engineers in SRAM baseball caps sporting weapons derived from X-Sync-2 chainrings... you really want me to make things worse?!

Okay, one common local, really old, example is the old Rocky Mountain ETSX. There were tons of ETSX bikes around and I still regularly see them for sale used but a solid scan of the seat tube will usually yield at least one crack - where it joins the top tube, at either of the bearing journals or at the shock mount. 

Now, say we take a 2007 ETSX and that's a solid NO SALE, what's interesting is that 2007 happens to also be the best year of the Rocky Mountain Switch. Looking for a shuttle/park bike for as cheap as possible and want a genuinely great bike? The Switch has a good leverage ratio that's not hard on shocks and can easily handle a double crown fork in the event that a 1-1/8" single crown proves hard to come by. 

I've recently seen a 2007 Green Switch in really decent shape, with a freshly serviced shock, that was bought for $600 mated to a used Fox 40 coil dropped to 180mm travel that was in great shape bought for $450 + a service. Shuttle ready with fresh suspension for $1050 all in.

.

I threw in some more generic where-to-look ideas in my reply to Bagheera above.

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JBV
0
James Vasilyev  - May 9, 2018, 1:09 p.m.

Felt bicycles were never on my radar before. Until now...

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riley
0
Riley  - May 9, 2018, 1:13 p.m.

Haha yes Felt indeed. I was thinking that too.

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jan
0
Jan  - May 9, 2018, 1:42 p.m.

Another great read, Andrew. I had a similar experience filtering through classifieds in pretty shocking condition while trying to source a proper mtb for the girlfriend a few summers ago. 

On a tangential note, I thought focusing on riding my Surface exclusively would alleviate my upgradeitus, but here I am looking at a 2018 smuggler frame awaiting a headset and bb .... And so it begins again.

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AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - May 9, 2018, 2:17 p.m.

Thanks Jan!

Yes, upgradeitus is real. It strikes with impunity both when you totally except it and when you don't and there is no cure... just a lifetime of temporary treatment options.

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ws
0
ws  - May 10, 2018, 11:46 a.m.

In addition to checking it mechanically, checking the serial number on CPIC or other stolen bike registries is a must.  I'm shopping for a used bike and am seeing so many "selling for my friend" history unknown ads out there.  If we could avoid buying stolen we could maybe dry up the market such that it was no longer profitable and I wouldn't need a 10 pound chain and lock for my bikes.

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AndrewMajor
+1 Mammal
Andrew Major  - May 10, 2018, 1:01 p.m.

As someone holding out hope that their stolen, loaded, Kona Jake The Snake custom single speed will turn up at some point I heartily support this message!

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ws
+1 Mammal
ws  - May 10, 2018, 1:13 p.m.

My daughter's Kona hardtail ended up on Craigslist about 10 days after it was stolen.  Arranged a meeting to purchase it from a guy downtown (with the VPD attending) but buddy backed out at the last minute.  Keep watching online.  I came oh so close to getting her bike back.  Ultimately replaced it with a used bike that needs a fork service :)

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mammal
0
Mammal  - May 10, 2018, 1:38 p.m.

Funny you mention that Andrew...

I had an (Ex)-buddy who got into some bad times and ended up being pretty underhanded. He "bought" a bike online in Victoria and actually ended up ripping it off from the guy. 

A few years later in North Van, our mutual RCMP friend (D.V. - Rocky Affiliate) was telling a story about his Snake getting snaked back in Vic and then we pieced it all together... Yep, it had all come full circle. What are the chances? D.V. never ended up acting on it, but I wish he did. My Ex-buddy ended up cleaning up his life in the end, but it makes for a hell of a story for anyone who knows either of these dudes.

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AndrewMajor
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Andrew Major  - May 10, 2018, 4:43 p.m.

D.V. is a LEGEND. Off-duty high speed road bike chase to recover a stolen bike that results in a leaping-from-road-bike flying-tackle apprehension in full Lycra.

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mammal
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Mammal  - May 11, 2018, 11:15 a.m.

That's exactly what I expected (hoped) would happen... But of course, he took the high road.

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