TRAIL NEWS

Boogie Nights is Re-Opening, and You're Invited!

Date Mar 31, 2022

The mountains of the North Shore of British Columbia have long evoked feelings of euphoria and terror in mountain bikers around the globe. The words are synonymous with moss-laden cedar woodwork elevated precariously high in the trees of the coastal rainforest. Since the inception of mountain biking, the allure of "the jank" has brought media and riders from all over the world to be humbled by this unforgiving terrain.

While this is an amazing legacy to have, the trail network has seen little in the form of evolution over the years. The perception of mountain bikers on the shore remains tarnished to many local residents and land managers by the romanticized characterizations of the early days of the pot-smoking scofflaws, skidding down the hiking trails (much respect to the pioneers!). We hope we can help change this perception while creating a modern trail network for all to enjoy.

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Over the past three decades, the sport of mountain biking has evolved rapidly with a monumental surge—especially in the past 5 years. Mountain bike technology, ridership numbers, rider demographics, and trail building standards have all seen vast changes. The trail infrastructure has felt the brunt of the ridership increase but has seen minimal evolution in building style or consideration of the needs of the trail users from land managers. Only in the last couple of years (accelerated by the pandemic bike boom and talks with the NSMBA) have we seen any governing bodies start to reach out to riders for input on what their opinions and needs are.  

With droves of new riders and new riding styles emerging, the Shore needs more trails that offer progressive features, allowing riders to learn new skills safely without resorting to rogue building to satisfy their needs. 

With Kona’s support through the Trail Adoption Program (TAP) and the blessing of the NSMBA we set off to try and provide an example of what a modern progressive trail could look like on Mount Seymour. The riding community came together in a huge way over the winter months to put in countless volunteer hours, often working late into the night. The number of volunteers is too long to list but thank you to all the avid trail builders out there! Our backs are sore but our stoke is high!

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Comments

BenHD
BenHD
1 month, 3 weeks ago
+1 Pete Roggeman

The end scene is the best! Haha, crazy!

Reply

Sethimus
Sethimus
1 month, 3 weeks ago
0

sheesh, don’t let wade see this

Reply

kenn-dubeau
Kenn Dubeau
1 month, 3 weeks ago
0

My brother says he is washed up   =P

Reply

RAHrider
Reed Holden
1 month, 2 weeks ago
0

This comment has been removed.

leon-forfar
leon-forfar
1 month, 2 weeks ago
0

This comment has been removed.

RHrider
RHrider
1 month, 2 weeks ago
-1 PowellRiviera leon-forfar Mammal

So a giant jump line dug up into the forest is the way to win back hikers? Somehow I don't see this type of trail which is an eye sore as the solution to our image problem. I always thought the classic north shore trails made use of natural features that helped them dissolve into the forest.

I realize that I have a personal stake in this, preferring jank over berms but I also realize that we share the shore with hikers. Hikers go to the shore to enjoy nature (largely). Their trails do the least impact. Classic north shore trails forced riders to deal with the terrain rather than just destroying it or covering it up. Sure it makes for a more advanced trail but it also fits in with the natural contours.

I think it's great that companies like Kona have invested in trail development and maintenance but I don't see boogie nights as the evolution of the north shore trail. I think seventh secret, good sir martin and forever after are much better examples of north shore trails that have been developed or evolved to be sustainable with the north shore traffic without destroying the natural landscape of the shore. If every trail on the shore was like boogie nights, what would that look like? Not somewhere I'd want to hike or ride personally.

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leon-forfar
leon-forfar
1 month, 2 weeks ago
+4 Mammal Ryan Walters vantanclub Sven Luebke

Not every trail is like Boogie Nights though. In fact, it's the only legal jump trail. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having different options for trails. Obviously, this is an advanced-level jump trail, but it was before too. Lots of people prefer tech jank, but there are also a lot of riders who want to ride jumps without having to drive to Squamish or Whistler. I also fail to see how it's an eyesore, with those beautifully hand-slapped, square-edged berms and lips. I also wouldn't call this "destroying" the terrain. It's more like reshaping the existing terrain. This isn't some machine-built clear- cut jump trail. I understand the idea of natural trails "blending in", but this trail takes up 0.01% of the trail network on the shore, and there are plenty of other trails to enjoy pure "untouched" landscape. 

Also, Hikers should stay off of Boogie Nights (which is a mountain bike-only trail) for both their own safety as well as the riders. As mentioned, there are tons more hiking trail options across our three local mountains.

Reply

RHrider
RHrider
1 month, 2 weeks ago
-1 PowellRiviera Mammal leon-forfar

Did you read the article? It makes out that previous trail builders were doing things wrong (granted they were in a some ways) but they talk about this trail as how it "should be done." I've ridden boogie nights, I know exactly what it is. You may think it is a thing of beauty (as a trail for jumping) but I can guarantee you that hikers would not appreciate all bike trails being cut and built as this one is. Even though hikers may not go on our trails they still have to look at them and if they just cut through nature and overwhelm the scenery, it isn't really a great image for us in terms of stewardship of the natural habitat. I have nothing to do with trail building on seymour but when they write about a giant swath of a trail covering over all form of nature and leaving no sign of what was underneath it as the evolution of trail building - I disagree. I think it caters to a particular type of rider who wants maximum jumps with the smallest risk or skill needed. But that's where it ends. There are numerous videos of riders making north shore jank flow and pop. The terrain doesn't really lend itself to flow trails and if we were to believe that all trails should conform to this "evolution" of trail building I think it would be for the worse.

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leon-forfar
leon-forfar
1 month, 2 weeks ago
+3 Mammal Ryan Walters vantanclub

That's not how I read it, and definitely not how it was intended to be read. From what I took away, they are saying that riders and rider skill levels have been rising and rising, while the trail network has stayed somewhat neutral. With more riders, more variety in trails is wanted. What used to be a handful of guys "skidding down hiking trails" are now hundreds of riders on trails built specifically for mountain biking. There are now enough people into jumps to warrant a high quality jump trail worthy of being on the North Shore. People used to (and still do) travel the world to ride the North Shore and its gnarly terrain. The old school hucks and jumps are mostly decommissioned now. Other municipalities have caught up, and passed the shore for freeride stuff. If you want to ride proper good (legal) jumps, you pretty much have to drive to Whistler, the Sunshine Coast, or Kamloops and beyond. Now we have a SMALL slice of jump heaven on the shore.  This is the evolution they are talking about. More and more people have asked for jumps over the years, and here they are.

I'm not sure what your fixation on hikers is regarding this trail. It is a mountain bike only trail, and hikers should stay off of it for everyone's safety. You also cannot see Boogie Nights from anywhere but on the trail itself. Again, this is the only trail like this on the shore. Not all bike trails end up like this. It is literally a one-off right now. There will never be an overwhelming amount of jump trails in any trail network because of the cost, effort, space and maintenance needed to make them. I don't think mountain bikers would want every trail to look like this either. Everything in moderation, as they say. There is room and reason for this trail to exist alongside the countless North Shore classics.

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