2021 Santa Cruz Blur1.jpg
FIRST LOOK & RIDE IMPRESSIONS

Blowing Minds: Santa Cruz Blur

Words Pete Roggeman
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Jul 13, 2021
Reading time

When NSMB got started way back in the first summer of this millennium, XC bikes were not a part of the formula. Sure, many of those involved had recently owned or ridden XC bikes, but that wasn't what NSMB was about, because that wasn't what the North Shore was about, and that wasn't the kind of bike or trails we were all riding. Over the years, we've hemmed and hawed about cross-country bikes. Do we cover them? What about World Cup racing - especially when there's a Canadian doing well? Are we stupid for leaving such a huge category untouched, or do we follow our noses and leave those leg-shaving roadie wannabes to their own devices (Strava)?

Until now, we didn't have to wrestle too hard with those questions, because none of us were particularly tempted by XC bikes. Of course there have been lots of chances to ride and test them, and lots of impressive bikes brought to life over the years that we appreciate...but none we wanted in any of our respective garages*. That all changed earlier this year when Santa Cruz chap-at-large Seb Kemp called to ask if I wanted to race BC Bike Race this year on a new bike they were releasing? Seb knows I've been wanting to do BCBR for years, but I'm no racer and the summer schedule is busy...year after year I half-heartedly declare my intent, and then whole-heartedly find a way to weasel out of committing to it. Without knowing it, Seb has called my bluff and it turns out I'm sitting on pocket aces. I think.

Before that phone call, had I been pressed to choose a bike I'd want to race BCBR on, I'd say something like Santa Cruz Tallboy, or Rocky Mountain Instinct, or Trek Fuel EX...there are tons of options, but you get the idea, right? Light duty trail bikes. And that's because my experience and comfort level on mountain bikes starts at about 120 or 130mm of rear wheel travel and goes up from there (hard tail and road bike dalliances notwithstanding).

2021 Santa Cruz Blur41.jpg

BC Bike Race + Santa Cruz Blur = ...?

But the more I thought about it, the more it made sense that I should ride BCBR on a cross-country bike (especially if it was one that handled well). I'm not a small guy - especially by XC race standards - at 6'1 (185 cm) and 190 (86 kg) - and I'll likely lose a few more if I can avoid drinking too many Salted Lime Lagers from La Cervezeria Astilleros, but even now that's lighter than I've been in recent years. I don't race because I'd rather ride for fun with buddies and drink beer, although like most aging guys I have an illusion in my mind of how fit or fast I 'could be if I just trained'. As someone who will be comfortable on the terrain the BC Bike Race covers aboard just about any bike, but could use every advantage I can get on the climbs, it makes sense to elevate my floor rather than trying to raise my ceiling. Right?

Maybe I'm wrong, but the fact is I'm not trying to be a fast guy, I just want to have a good time with a bunch of other MTB sickos for 7 straight long days on the bike, and having the right tool for that little bucket list-ticking adventure sounds like a good plan.

Ok then, Seb, I'll do it.

*Can we get rid of the word quiver asap, please? Once it's been used more than a handful of times in bike reviews, it's dead. Quiver killer thus died in 1999 and if you use or believe in that concept, you're my enemy because n+1 for life, but I think it's about time we assassinate quiver as well.

The Santa Cruz Blur

Look, there's a lot going on with this bike, which surprises me to write about a XC race bike, and usually our First Look format means we spend a lot of time on a bike's details, geo, and spec so we can leave the qualitative stuff for the review. But the new Blur and Blur TR launched on June 1st, and our test bike arrived something like 2 days before that (thanks, Covid!) - which was also about 10 days after I finished a move from North Van to Sechelt on the Sunshine Coast (not on Vancouver Island, by the way - even BC locals get that wrong - although you do need to take a ferry to get here). So, believe my excuses or not if you want, but the info is out there and you can also find complete Santa Cruz Blur specs and pricing here, and geometry here. Instead, let's do our own thing and pretend we're having a beer and talking about bikes and the terrifying prospect of the BC Bike Race being your first race (other than the occasional half-hearted North Shore Ripper or Enduro) in more than a decade*.

*and really, I'm just saying that. I've never really raced XC. I've done stages of BCBR, and I've gone on long rides with very fit jerks who are clearly trying to use their legs and lungs to assassinate me, but actually strapping a plate to my bike and getting after it? Nope.

2021 Santa Cruz Blur Highlights

  • Two configurations: XC and TR - differences explained below
  • Santa Cruz's new SuperLight suspension design uses carbon flex stays - there goes Santa Cruz flexing its carbon engineering chops, again
  • SuperLight uses the leverage curve to achieve the control and support they wanted rather than anti-squat - the goal being to reduce chain-induced forces on the suspension so the bike provides more traction and sensitivity on the way up and down
  • 289g lighter than previous Blur
  • Size specific chainstay lengths
  • 29-inch wheels only need apply for World Cup/Olympic XC racing
  • Size Range: S-XL
  • Materials: C and CC Carbon

Santa Cruz Blur XC:

  • Full-on XC racing
  • 100mm front and rear
  • Light tires (Maxxis Aspen 2.4)
  • Light and short dropper post
  • Remote lockout
  • RockShox SidLuxe and Sid SL

Santa Cruz Blur TR:

  • TR - not a trail bike, it's a XC bike for certain courses (well thanks for calling it TR then, Santa Cruz!)
  • 120mm front and 115mm rear (achieved simply by running a longer stroke shock)
  • Beefier tires (Maxxis Rekon)
  • Full height adjust dropper post
  • No remote lockout
  • Bigger rotors
  • Fox 34 Stepcast

Looking at all of those details, it's an easy choice for me - as well as for most of you reading this, I would think - to go for the TR version since it'll still be plenty fast and light but a heck of a lot more suitable to the trails around here. Thanks to tricky supply issues, however, Santa Cruz was only able to wrangle up an XC version for me in XL. In the near future, they're going to send a longer stroke shock which I'll pair with a Fox 34 for the front end at 120mm or even stretch it out to a pre-approved 130mm. In the interim, I've been riding it in full-gun XC race mode: 100mm front and back, high-volume but tiny-knobbed 2.4 Maxxis Aspens, SidLuxe shock and Sid SL fork with front and rear lockout available. 'What the hell' I thought, 'might as well see how it rides like this'.

As I mentioned, I've recently moved to Sechelt and the nearest trail network to me are the West Sechelt trails, consisting of a lot of low-angle undulations and a mix of mid- and high-speed singletrack. There are some steep and technical sections but in general the trails are more reminiscent of Hornby Island or even Cumberland than, say, North Van or Squamish. In other words: primo BC cross-country conditions (it's no coincidence that BC Bike Race has used these trails on many occasions). I was confident the Blur would work well, but I didn't really know what to expect. I owned a Rocky Element MSC back in 2011 but otherwise haven't spent more than one or two rides every now and then on XC bikes. Of course I expected it to pedal and climb well, and that would be helpful to race on, but what about the giggly wiggly bits? Can 100mm front and back be enough for me to have fun in a 'trail bike' way rather than just 'XC bike' fun? And would these silly-looking XC race tires be any more useful than overfed gravel tires? Is front and rear lockout really necessary?

2021 Santa Cruz Blur Geometry.png

Cross country bike geo has changed in recent years, just like it has on other bike types.

2021 Santa Cruz Blur TR Geometry.png

Sharp eyes will notice that chain stay length is tailored to each frame size.

Turns out I was in for a surprise. The rear pivot-less flex stays of the Superlight suspension are remarkably effective. It's clear Santa Cruz went to great pains to eliminate XC bike harshness from the rate curve, without letting you blow through it or wallow too much. There's just enough anti-squat for it to feel efficient without being constantly reminded that you're on a short-travel XC bike. It really feels like a short-travel trail bike, which is a neat trick because there isn't a lot of stroke length to play with. So, rather than feeling like I had to either run a ton of pressure to keep from bottoming out, or back off the pressure to avoid that virtual hardtail sensation, instead I found myself on a bike that was a joy to pedal to and from the trailhead (fast, efficient, great pedaling position) but that hardly slowed down once I hit the trails. And then up I go, and here the Blur really starts to shine. The first time I took it up Duracell (one of the more useful ways to climb up into the West Sechelt trail network), the difference between climbing it on my Sentinel and on the Blur was fairly drastic. The Sentinel is a decent climber, and the Blur should be noticeably better, and it was, to the tune of about three extra gears and less effort.

There are a lot of things working in the Blur's favour and it should surprise no one that it climbs well - it's engineered to race XC at the World Cup level after all - but actually feeling it myself and then realizing it didn't feel like a compromise riding it on those trails was a revelation. The super fast Maxxis Aspen tires and sub-1400g Reserve Carbon wheel set help greatly, as well as the ~24 lb. bike weight, but what I was feeling was a sum of the parts kind of fast that makes the Blur vastly different to climb on than a typical trail bike. As for that lockout, well, I am using it on paved or gravel sections when I remember it, which is another way of saying that this bike pedals superbly even with the suspension open (as it should) but if you need that extra gear, locking it out really does make it scamper. For a racer looking for an edge or an endurance rider needing some long-term efficiency, it's a no-brainer, but if you're not the type to remember to use it, the Blur is phenomenally efficient without locking out both ends.

Revelatory on the climbs or not, my main curiosity was how the Blur would be on the descents. I was told it was definitely not a Tallboy, so I was apprehensive that the Blur would be too skittish to be pushed through corners or that the tires would be terrifying even in dry conditions, meaning my training rides were going to be something to be tolerated rather than enjoyed. Nope! Partial credit goes to the fantastic trails around here, which have been around for decades and were built in a timeless way that uses the terrain rather than works against it - they flow along contours rather than across them, giving the rider a great climb:descent ratio and a lot of chances to hoot and holler (which doubles as a heads up to any bears in the area).

So I wanted to start cautiously but discovered pretty quickly that the Blur would not only carry great speed through corners - even somewhat rough ones - but was also brilliant at recapturing any momentum you gave up with heavy braking or a badly chosen line. Two quick pedal strokes and a pump or two and I'd be right back up to cruising speed. As both Cam and Cooper have discovered, the Sid is a more than capable fork, and I haven't found it to be too flexy as long as I keep things within reason. The tires have just enough bite to carve a good line on firm-packed loam but cower in fear from anything loose or too soft. I'm very impressed with them compared to my first impression, however, which was that they'd be good to commute to the trailhead and nothing more. The 120tpi EXO casings give enough support but also feel sublime in those conditions, and the newly-released Reserve 28|XC wheels are beautifully balanced between compliant feel and stiff performance.

2021 Santa Cruz Blur3.jpg

The only Santa Cruz in the lineup with a top-tube mounted shock - and two water bottle cages in the main triangle (there's another set of mounts on the down tube for those 6-hour training rides in the middle of nowhere).

2021 Santa Cruz Blur40.jpg

There are a lot more kilometers to come aboard the Blur between now and October, when BC Bike Race takes place for the first time in Penticton. I will report back after swapping in a longer shock and fork and some other tire choices as well as how the training is going (mostly what my favourite recovery beers turn out to be). Ultimately I'm curious to figure out whether a bike like the Blur makes sense as a 'little bike' for someone like me in a place like Sechelt, or if purpose-built XC bikes - even ones as versatile as the Blur is turning out to be - are a bit on the small and svelte side. I didn't know what to expect when this started, and I'm not going to be shaving my legs anytime soon, but so far my rides on the Blur have been a total blast and I'm loving the chance to rediscover how fun it is to sprint between corners and feel a bike come so alive by virtue of having this much raw speed.

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Abies
0
Simon Apostol  - July 12, 2021, 8:38 p.m.

I’m trying out long gravel rides again this summer and boy, the idea of a similar experience but a little more trail focused is starting to hold some appeal. I cut my riding teeth doing marathon-ish and xc racing and while that’s over a decade behind me, this bike is giving me some feels. Would love to ride one and compare with my tallboy- I’m sure it’s wildly different.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Dan
Pete Roggeman  - July 12, 2021, 10:17 p.m.

You're right in the ballpark. Tallboy is a short travel trail bike that punches up. Blur is a great xc bike that could grow up and be a trail bike. The parents on the sidelines whisper about it but no one wants to say it aloud because the kid plays its current position so we'll, but everyone knows that with a few of the right decisions it could easily happen. 

I've already made jokes about this being my new gravel bike. Mtn bikers laugh, gravel riders take themselves a little seriously to understand I'm joking, but I'm not really.

Reply

denomerdano
+3 Dan Cr4w Supergirl56
Deniz Merdano  - July 12, 2021, 10:57 p.m.

Make gravel fully again!

Reply

fartymarty
+1 AJ Barlas
fartymarty  - July 13, 2021, 5:52 a.m.

Pete, Once you are done with the BCBR do you have any plans of seeing what the Blur could morph into - i'm thinking overforking and an angleset. Short travel, slack trail scalpel (I wasn't going to mention the DC word as I will probably be banned from NSMB indefinitely :P)

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 JVP Timer
Pete Roggeman  - July 13, 2021, 8:20 a.m.

I don't know. At a certain point you make so many changes that you just have to admit you bought the wrong bike. Tallboy is a trail scalpel.

Yeah, DC...what's funny is that term was once used as a joke and the lack of imagination in this biz just latched onto it. All bikes go up and down and xc bikes especially always had to do both.

Reply

fartymarty
+2 Pete Roggeman Kerry Williams
fartymarty  - July 13, 2021, 10:25 a.m.

Fair point on the TB (I've not ridden one but probably should).

I think Mike Levy still thinks it's a joke.  For me they're all bikes - some do some things better than others.  Pigeonholing is so limiting.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Andrew Major Kerry Williams
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:17 a.m.

It's not that I'm a stodgy traditionalist, I just think downcountry is a ridiculous term because everyone's rapid embrace of it flies in the face of the fact that mountain biking was always about riding up and then back down again. So to call something DC is to imply that a regular cross country bike is not good at going downhill...and that's not true at all. It depends on what trails you ride. Are XC bikes better climbers than trail or all-mountain bikes? Of course.

It's the same thing with calling everything Enduro. It bothers me so much, but I've more than given up on that one now. The industry is full of unimaginative sheep when it comes to that stuff, and the temptation to jump on a term just because it'll help you sell bikes is understandable but distasteful. 

And yeah, Levy is still laughing about it, and to be clear, I place no blame on Mike and think he's a breath of fresh air, but brands and other media just lapped it up. I don't blame consumers one bit - once they read or see a term enough times, of course, they'll adopt it.

Downcountry can dig a hole, crawl into it and die.

Reply

oliver-burke
0
Oliver Burke  - July 13, 2021, 7:06 a.m.

Really trying to decide between the TR version of this or an Epic Evo.  Anyone ridden both yet.  I know supply is an issue on doing this

Reply

arca_tern
0
arca_tern  - July 14, 2021, 11:21 p.m.

Exact matchup I’m contemplating

Reply

rigidjunkie
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Allen Lloyd  - July 13, 2021, 7:29 a.m.

I was just thinking about this bike.  My current bike is a 1st gen Hightower and it is too much bike for my local trails and not quite enough bike for bike parks.  So I am constantly compromised.  Something like this and a Megatower (if keeping everything in the SC family) would be a dam near perfect setup.

Reply

taprider
+3 Todd Hellinga Suns_PSD Andy Eunson skua Dan Conant
taprider  - July 13, 2021, 7:45 a.m.

Funny how it is cliché for MTB journalists/writers to diminish XC. They have to make excuses for reviewing new XC bikes, and even then, try to modify them in ways to reduce the bikes' abilities.

For a change, it would be nice to read a review by someone enthusiastic about XC and/or XC racing.  After all Fast is Fun*  

*95% of the North Shore has always been faster on an XC bike. Plus, there have been more XC races on the Shore since the 1980s than DH or Enduro (regularly using trails like Neds, Dales, Severed and 7th).

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Andrew Major Metacomet
Pete Roggeman  - July 13, 2021, 8:15 a.m.

For too long, WC xc race courses were horribly boring. I watched a bunch of them live in quite a few different countries so I have a good idea. Xc on the shore is hard for people to comprehend unless they've ridden here. When writing for our audience we like to use the lens of being in the shore but appeal to a wider geographic audience. It's a tough balance. But nsmb has always been more focused on trail riding and up. 

95% of the trails I ride on the shore would have already destroyed many parts of this bike even at 50% of my usual (unimpressive) speed. Or the tires would have landed me in hospital.

Reply

cooperquinn
+5 Deniz Merdano Dan Suns_PSD Whitesell1041 Tjaard Breeuwer
Cooper Quinn  - July 13, 2021, 8:52 a.m.

If you want "data" - I'm consistently faster down Boogieman on the Spur with a DHF/Rekon than I am on my Altitude with Assegai/DHRII.

Reply

taprider
0
taprider  - July 13, 2021, 10:21 a.m.

Which is faster up NO 1/4 or GSM?  After all 50% of the Shore is uphill, so why limit your fun to only the difficult downhill sections?  With the right bike you can have fun 95% of your ride time (extra light noodles/liners help).

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Dan Conant Metacomet
Pete Roggeman  - July 13, 2021, 12:21 p.m.

I'm not going to argue fun up vs fun down with anyone. You do you. But for the last 20 yrs I've been prioritizing the down with a weight of 98 vs 2.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - July 14, 2021, 8:23 a.m.

The Spur is miles faster up anything. It makes pedaling on the Altitude feel like you've dropped anchor. 

The Spur is, however, not the bike to be on when you get into properly heinous trails or big moves.

Reply

taprider
0
taprider  - July 14, 2021, 8:52 a.m.

OOPS sorry.  I didn't understand your previous comment at first. I thought the Spur was a bigger bike than the Altitude (was mistakenly thinking of the older Altitude)

cooperquinn
+2 taprider Tjaard Breeuwer
Cooper Quinn  - July 14, 2021, 11:35 a.m.

Ha, no worries. Yeah, the Spur has 50mm less travel on either end, and is 6lbs lighter.

taprider
0
taprider  - July 14, 2021, 12:41 p.m.

Thanks

Anyway, I should have wrote to start with, it would be nice to read reviews directed at BC XC riders in the market to buy a bike available at local bike shops for the purpose of actually racing  (whether to win a BC Cup or High School race doesn't matter).

and any suggested modifications would be how make a lower spec level bike more competitive/raceable for the least amount of money

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Kerry Williams
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:21 a.m.

I understand wanting to read more about XC bikes - in BC or otherwise. But, just like gravel bikes or bikepacking, we don't write about it much because it's not what we're traditionally into. That doesn't mean we won't do it in the future, but I'm pretty sure I explained that perspective explicitly in the intro to my article.

doodersonmcbroseph
+1 taprider
doodersonmcbroseph  - July 13, 2021, 9:15 a.m.

FWIW Dale Stone has been riding a Norco Revolver on all kinds of fun stuff.

Reply

taprider
0
taprider  - July 13, 2021, 10:47 a.m.

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
0
Tjaard Breeuwer  - July 15, 2021, 7:51 a.m.

@Pete Roggeman said:

“When writing for our audience we like to use the lens of being in the shore but appeal to a wider geographic audience. It's a tough balance. But nsmb has always been more focused on trail riding and up.”

I am on a different Northshore (Lake Superior’s). I am totally happy with the way NSMB writes from a (Vancouver)Northshore based perspective. After all, it is in the name! I then just calibrate what you write, into the trails I will be riding.

Where I think there is a bit of a problem, is with the larger media outlets, that write for a global audience. First of all, I (the reader) often don’t know what type of trails they are riding on when they review bikes, and second, they often forget that there is such a diversity of trails and riding styles out there and making sweeping generalizations about a bike or component’s suitability.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Kerry Williams
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:22 a.m.

I'll join you in agreeing that the vast majority of writing out there in the MTB space is both poorly done from a writing perspective, as well as properly helping the reader understand what is going on from the writer's lens. It's a low bar, but we do what we can to raise it.

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - July 13, 2021, 9:28 a.m.

*reminisces* the local OG xc race scene was RAD. if only we had dropper posts back then. memories of highposting down stuff like severed (hell of the north) on shitty 2" tires, 71* headangles, 150mm stems & 22" flat bars...

Reply

taprider
+1 Pete Roggeman
taprider  - July 13, 2021, 10:36 a.m.

...and we had lots of fun with those old bikes.  Since everyone was on nearly the same equipment (though I used 2.25 red-walled Panaracers for Hell of the North), and trails were more natural and less manicured, the pure mtn bikers with skills could make up minutes on the tech sections over fitness-only type racers (now you can only make up seconds because trails are faster and bikes easier to ride)

PS: I thought you developed the "on the fly" reach down to the QR and drop the saddle while pedaling up the last bit of uphill?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:23 a.m.

Learning to drop my QR on the fly was a big moment in my early riding days.

Reply

taprider
0
taprider  - July 13, 2021, 7:52 a.m.

I like the look of the Blur, and how some colour makes it appear much slimmer than black (especially as XC riders don't want their down tube to look fat and ebike like)

Reply

craw
0
Cr4w  - July 13, 2021, 7:59 a.m.

Those are some curious geometry choices. Decidedly traditional geo where the ESTA gets slacker in the bigger sizes but sort of progressive in having different chainstay lengths. Was a reason given for the slackening ESTA for bigger sizes?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Pete Roggeman  - July 13, 2021, 8:19 a.m.

Yes and I'll talk more about that in a future article.

Reply

Toisanboy
0
Rich Chin  - July 13, 2021, 8:17 a.m.

I wonder how this compares to the Tallboy 3 which was a big favorite at NSMB a few years back.  The geometry and travel are similar.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - July 16, 2021, 9:13 a.m.

I haven't ridden the new Blur, but I'd guess its quite different than the Tallboy, based on my experience here: 

https://nsmb.com/articles/2021-transition-spur-v-santa-cruz-tallboy/

Reply

shoreboy
+2 Bogey Andy Eunson
Shoreboy  - July 13, 2021, 8:22 a.m.

"Sharp eyes will notice that chain stay length is tailored to each frame size."

I applaud any manufacturer who is adopting rear centres for each size. What I don't really understand is how 7mm over the entire size range is going to make any difference at all? Granted these are shorter wheelbase bikes as they are XC oriented and I am by no means a geometry expert. Just an armchair observation.

Reply

Ceecee
-1 Spencer Nelson
Ceecee  - July 13, 2021, 9:05 a.m.

7mm of diff? Prob the most the pivot location can be varied, if swingarms are all same, as on other recent models. Mindblowing quivers of beer are not vastly assassinated here. It's not what he knows, but whom. Large Tallboy, Rsrv 28, Cascade link, firm suspension setup; aka Spur

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:24 a.m.

There are a lot of words there, but none of them are coherent. If you were speaking, I'd ask what colour the marbles were that populate your mouth.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - July 26, 2021, 10:43 p.m.

Perhaps a google translate mishap.

Reply

cooperquinn
0
Cooper Quinn  - July 13, 2021, 8:38 a.m.

I'll be interested in your longterm thoughts on the remote lockout. 

Its obviously a must-have for XC racing, but the SiD/SiDluxe are *quite* locked out when activated. I find myself using only using it on paved climbs. For the average buyer, the remote seems like a bunch of weight they don't need. And I hate the rats nest of cables hanging off the front [glances at Scott...]

Reply

denomerdano
0
Deniz Merdano  - July 13, 2021, 11:44 a.m.

Rats have feelings too, you know..

Atleast they hid the shock now... Cause it was very busy looking... I guess... Sarcasm

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Pete Roggeman  - July 13, 2021, 12:24 p.m.

I've only used it on gravel and paved, never on trail. So, highly dependent on where you're riding. But I wouldn't pay either the financial penalty or the one costing grams unless I was paid to race and expecting to sprint or grind up smooth climbs.

Reply

DaveSmith
0
Dave Smith  - July 13, 2021, 9:55 p.m.

Seeing as we are the same stature and I have similar fitness based aspirations of grandeur for next year, I'll be curious to see how the Sid stands up. I personally expect to pulverize anything less than a Pike because I know I won't be able to help myself and point the little bike into the chunder.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - July 29, 2021, 6:07 a.m.

I'll have to return to that 'experiment' because the Fox 34 SC has now shown up and I just put it on the Blur yesterday. Might be tough to convince me to give up that extra 20mm of front wheel travel, but who knows - this bike has already surprised me in more ways than one.

Reply

arca_tern
0
arca_tern  - July 14, 2021, 11:22 p.m.

Hey Pete, why xl over large? Their size chart shows 185 as being either or. I’m the same height and similar weight, and had been thinking more large than Xl. 

Thoughts?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - July 16, 2021, 11:26 a.m.

I have short legs and a long torso so I usually ride bikes that fit the average human measuring 6'3 or 4.

Reply

Tjaardbreeuwer
0
Tjaard Breeuwer  - July 15, 2021, 8:01 a.m.

I wonder what the difference in weight is between the suspension on the XC and TR Blur versions? Stepcast 34 is a lot heavier than a SID, but you loose the remotes. That might make it fairly close.

Reply

Ceecee
0
Ceecee  - July 15, 2021, 10:05 a.m.

Less than Barlas' saddle rotation, but in ounces instead of degrees? You could look it up. When will we see the first 1200mm wheelbase/65d hta size medium XC bike? Geometry v. travel

Reply

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