BikeYoke_Divine_Dropper_Post_NSMB_AndrewM_20.original-2.jpg
Teardown & Pre-install Impressions

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post Teardown

Words Andrew Major
Photos Andrew Major
Date Jan 28, 2020
Reading time

Divine Jealousy

NSMB tests a King's Ransom of top-level bike stuff, so it may be surprising that this BikeYoke Divine dropper post marks the first time I've been jealous of another tester. What I'm saying is, as with the Revive, I'm writing about tearing it down, but Niels will be doing the actual testing and review.

I've reviewed dropper posts just as smooth as the Revive, like the PNW Bachelor and Crank Brothers Highline 7, and I've also ridden the Fox Transfer | Race Face Turbine R and the original BikeYoke Revive. But, what's really interesting about BikeYoke's Divine isn't what's there, it's what isn't.

Or, as Jeff put it while laughing: "are you sure they didn't send you one missing a bunch of parts?"

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (6).JPG

The most notable external difference between the Divine and Revive is the lack of a reset function.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (3).JPG

No, it's not hiding on this side either. Spoiler alert: BikeYoke made it cheaper, simpler, and automatic.

Never mind writing up this piece, it took more time to get the photos off my camera and resize them than Jeff and I spent on the actual teardown and rebuild. It may be faster to do a full service on a post with a Wintek cartridge, but that includes recycling and replacing the cartridge. A splash of oil, a few o-rings; the combination of limited waste and quick, easy, service is impressive. Increased serviceability is a path to a greener bike industry and there are remarkably few wear items in the Divine post.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (19).JPG

The magic of the Divine is that it bleeds itself with every full drop. It's so simple that it's sort of ridiculous.

Once we had a hearty laugh over how damn simple the Divine post really is, Bikeroom-Jeff jokingly, but not entirely jokingly, suggested that Sacki at BikeYoke should stop designing bike parts and instead find simple solutions for global warming. As someone who regularly recommends the Revive to his customers, and is also a BikeYoke service center through his other venture, Wheelthing, Jeff may not be completely unbiased.

But it's clear he's noticed something that sets this product apart. Therein lies the root of my jealousy. I am very curious about how this engineering marvel will conduct itself on the Shore. No pressure, Niels!

Let's have a look inside.

Teardown Time

The Divine is a twin tube post just like BikeYoke's Revive model and in terms of basic design, they function in the same way. Push the button on the dropper remote and it smoothly actuates the lever arm at the bottom of the post. That lever pushes a long rod that opens a port. Sit on the saddle, oil flows through into the outer tube. Let off remote at desired post height. Unweight the saddle and hit the remote again and air pressure returns the saddle to full height as oil is cycled back into the inner tube.

There is no internal floating piston (IFP) to separate the air and oil so it is possible, occasionally, for air to get trapped in the inner tube. With the Revive this necessitated a couple-of-second procedure to bleed the post by tripping the 'Revive' valve. That's a couple of seconds versus having to rebuild a post with air trapped on the wrong side on an IFP.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (17).JPG

Button down: saddle locked in position.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (18).JPG

Button up: saddle telescoping up or down.

The Divine is another level more brilliant in that it self-bleeds every time the post is fully lowered. That means that for most of the folks I regularly ride with, the post would be bled almost as often as gears are shifted. For any half-masters out there, if a Divine post develops a bit of play, a quick trip to full bottom should sort it right out.

The Divine is also travel-adjustable via clip-on spacers although a teardown is required. Let's call it a 5-10 minute job depending on aptitude and experience. A lot of posts offer this feature now to the point that I wonder if I'm missing something. Are there that many riders that need to lower a 160mm post to 155mm in order get them to fit their frame or body dimensions?

BikeYoke claims their Revive system is marginally smoother, but the Divine feels smooth-as out of the box and it's a decent few Euros less expensive. If the reliability ends up being similar I think Divine sales will eat its lunch.

Speaking of smooth, have you ever tried a Tequila Negroni? It's a great placebo cure for the man flu and also fantastic filler content when you have lots of photos for a teardown but most of what you have to say goes in the photo captions. It's a super simple 2:1:1 concoction that can be made fairly cheap or heck, go all out with local liqueurs.

  • Two measures of tequila,
  • One measure Campari (or lately, Amaro),
  • One measure vermouth,
  • ...and it's business time. Sit down, hit some keys, write an article.

When I'm talking about the parts that make up BikeYoke's dropper posts, the obvious quality is my second favourite talking point. I really like the upfront, transparent availability of replacement parts. I can order any component for these posts easily either straight from BikeYoke or from one of their retail partners.

Whether that's wear items like keyway pins and seals or chassis parts, you'll always be able to get what you need and know what it costs. The Divine also shares a plethora of components with the Revive post, so there's no question of availability for new vs. old products.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (15).JPG

Keyway pins and other small parts are readily available when needed.

BikeYoke Divine Dropper Post NSMB AndrewM (24).JPG

The full wear item kit for the Divine or Revive, including the seal head and pins, is under 20 USD.

BikeYoke is now selling its posts with or without remotes. They're available in 30.9 and 31.6 sizes in 125mm, 160mm, and 185mm travel options. Prices are based on travel and range from 270 USD to 315 USD without a remote.

As with every BikeYoke product, there is a flood of information available about the Divine on their website including some well-crafted videos. I, for one, am really interested in reading Niels' full reporting.

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Comments

Xorrox
+3 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major kiwizak
Brad_xyz  - Jan. 28, 2020, 7:47 a.m.

"Are there that many riders that need to lower a 160mm post to 155mm in order get them to fit their frame or body dimensions?" 

YES, especially if you have short legs and a slightly longer torso!  I'm currently running my 150mm Reverb A2 at 137.5mm (exactly!) with the post slammed all the way to the collar on my 2017 Transition Patrol Carbon size L. 

It took a little while to figure out how to limit the travel on an A2 Reverb ;)

Reply

AndrewMajor
+2 twk Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - Jan. 28, 2020, 5:53 p.m.

I was being cheeky. One of my wife’s bikes the dropper clearance came down to <5mm with an externally routed Transfer (no Stealth mech/iceberg). The struggle is real. 

Maybe Trust will give up on linkage forks and start selling multi-linkage dropper posts for the inseam-challenged.

Reply

shoreboy
+2 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
Shoreboy  - Jan. 28, 2020, 8:23 a.m.

As a current Revive owner, Id be all over this post for whatever is my next build.  Looking forward to the review!

Reply

niels@nsmb.com
+2 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
Niels  - Jan. 28, 2020, 8:28 a.m.

I'm a little scared the post will just work and I won't have anything interesting to report!

Reply

AndrewMajor
+3 Timer Niels Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - Jan. 28, 2020, 5:47 p.m.

Hahahahahaha... I realized re-reading this that I totally set you up.

But hey, if you need filler you can always review my 2:1:1 Tequila Negroni recipe?!

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 Andrew Major
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 28, 2020, 8:14 p.m.

I'm disappointed you didn't include an updated photo, but I'll console myself by trying one of these on my next booze cheat day.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Andrew Major
Cam McRae  - Jan. 28, 2020, 9:41 p.m.

I'm a fan of the TQ Negroni but, Campari is a must and certainly not Aperol. Anything else isn't a Negroni! Also a little less red vermouth than Campari FTW.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Niels
Andrew Major  - Jan. 29, 2020, 9:28 a.m.

There you go Niels, you can review my TQ-N against Cam’s, include some glamour shots, and then throw in a few dropper post images and a paragraph for filler! 

This sh*t practically writes itself.

Reply

taprider
0
taprider  - Jan. 29, 2020, 3:05 p.m.

NSMB already has riders' cars articles, so why not riders with their drinks stories

craw
+3 Alex D Pete Roggeman Andrew Major
Cr4w  - Jan. 28, 2020, 11:47 a.m.

My Revive Is by far the best post I've ever had. As soon as they make a 200mm I'll get one of those too.

Reply

T-mack
+1 Pete Roggeman
T-mack  - Jan. 28, 2020, 12:24 p.m.

After having my 9point8 with the sideload rails I could never go back to this style. Post looks great otherwise.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+4 Pete Roggeman Andrew Major ManInSteel Luix
Jerry Willows  - Jan. 28, 2020, 1:59 p.m.

the best engineering is usually the simplest....

Reply

AndrewMajor
+3 Jerry Willows twk Pete Roggeman
Andrew Major  - Jan. 28, 2020, 5:46 p.m.

JW, I can never figure out if you’re trolling me or if there’s a single speeder buried in there somewhere...

Fully agree that simpler is - almost - always better.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+1 Andrew Major
Jerry Willows  - Jan. 30, 2020, 1:26 p.m.

singlespeed for the bike park would be perfect...  seriously looking at 10 speed again though.  Way less weight and cheaper.

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/staff-ride-matt-wraggs-specialized-stumpjumper-evo.html

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Jerry Willows
Andrew Major  - Jan. 30, 2020, 2:32 p.m.

Single speed for the park for sure. Didn’t work as hoped on my FS trail bike but I assumed you’d be switching to a hardtail re. simple solutions.

I tried 30x36t and I definitely need a bit more back end.

That, of course, means more weight because the Sunrace 11-42t is heavier. And a longer cage - but not Eagle long. I like the mix of an 11-spd XT derailleur and 10-spd shifter.

If 30x36t works for you then don’t think twice. Lots of NOS and lightly used stuff around.

Reply

LoamtoHome
0
Jerry Willows  - Jan. 30, 2020, 11 p.m.

XTR 11-36t with a 32t up front and Zee short cage derailleur could be the ticket.  I did have a SRAM XG-1099 11-36t and lasted over 5 years.  Do miss that setup.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+1 Jerry Willows
Andrew Major  - Jan. 30, 2020, 11:33 p.m.

Damn, 32x36t on your Stumpy Evo? You've been eating your spinach!

GiveitsomeWelly
0
Karl Fitzpatrick  - Jan. 29, 2020, 12:24 a.m.

When O when will a dropper manufacturer make 27.2mm post with 150mm travel? 

Us dinosaurs want a piece of this action too.

Surely a post this seemingly simple wouldn't have the same 'tolerance issues' that keep getting trotted out when explaining why a larger drop for the smaller diameter isn't possible. 

This thing looks bangin'.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 29, 2020, 10:41 a.m.

It isn’t just about cramming all the guts into a lot less real estate. Most 27.2 bikes aren’t using dropper-friendly modern geometry. Slacker actual seat angles leverage rider weight against the seal head, bushings, and whatever guide system the post uses to resist twisting. Combined with a lot less real estate and a limited market (people wanting longer dropper posts on older steel hardtails willing to drill Stealth exit holes in their seat tubes) I’d bet longer 27.2 posts will never happen.

Reply

velocipedestrian
+1 Andrew Major
Velocipedestrian  - Jan. 29, 2020, 1:02 p.m.

You're right, but my old (really, 2004) Horst 5Spot would like one.

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 30, 2020, 2:34 p.m.

Sweet bike. Polished front and rear? Photo?

Reply

GiveitsomeWelly
0
Karl Fitzpatrick  - Feb. 1, 2020, 11:58 p.m.

All these points might be valid B-U-T some very modern bikes have laughably slack actual seat tube angles (like, waaay slacker than a normal for 2007 hardtail). 

I know I sound like a whinger and clearly no dropper maker cares about little old me so I'll relent.

#rantover

Reply

Timer
+2 Karl Fitzpatrick Andrew Major
Timer  - Jan. 29, 2020, 3:41 p.m.

Lack of space and material flex is actually a big thing in long droppers. Sacki, the designer of the Bikeyoke posts explained in a German forum that he doesn't really like 200mm+ posts in seat tubes smaller than 35mm.

Reply

Eastieboy
+1 Andrew Major
Eastieboy  - Jan. 29, 2020, 11:07 a.m.

Looking at the long list of tools, materials, and parts I need to overhaul a Reverb I just acquired, this looks VERY attractive!

Reply

AndrewMajor
0
Andrew Major  - Jan. 30, 2020, 2:34 p.m.

But now you have the tool!

Reply

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