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REVIEW

7mesh Thunder Pants and Men's Skypilot Jacket

Words Cam McRae
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Jan 23, 2021
Reading time

Before I even dip my toe in, you should know that this review features gear from a category just slightly above... premium. Super premium? Hyper premium? Trust fund premium? Whatever the label, you'd better buckle up for the price tags before you hear anything that piques your interest and get invested, because together these two pieces will reduce what you leave for your children by 850 CAD, 650 USD, 650£ or 650€. This is less shocking when you realize the founder and founding staff at 7mesh all came from Arc'teryx, which you could argue is even pricier. A comparable example in terms of materials to 7mesh's 300 CAD Copilot jacket (review from Pete coming soon) which is made from Gore-Tex Paclite, is the 380 CAD Arc'teryx Zeta SL, which is most often seen locally on the Grouse Grind* or in Starbucks.

*B.C.'s most popular workout trail

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As my colleague AJ recently discovered, outerwear is one of those categories where price and value often align quite closely, and my experience with 7mesh has hammered that home.* For all that cash, you get the best materials money can buy, excellent construction quality, and uncompromising, often mountain bike-specific design, (for better or worse, as you'll see). You also get a warranty that aims to be among the best in the business, and that includes a crash repair or replacement if you do something nasty to your gear in the first 30 days, and a repair for a small fee if it happens even a few years down the road. If your garment has sustained a fatal wound, you'll get a discount on the purchase of a replacement. This peace of mind is worth something to be sure. Whether it's worth $400, or $450, or $850 Canadian dollars is up to you.

*There are of course exceptions to this rule and many fine

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7mesh Skypilot Jacket

The Skypilot is essentially last year's garment with a new name and re-aligned pockets. The material is the same and the features are identical, aside from those pockets, and the price went down by 50 CAD! The Guardian was 500 Canuck bucks and it was excellent aside from the funny pockets with zippers up toward your armpits with pouches that were aligned rearward. The only way you could put your hands in your pockets was to give yourself a hug and accessing whatever was inside the left pocket was only reasonably accomplished with your right hand, and vice versa.

While this was a bit of a pain, these deviant zippered enclaves did a nice job of keeping their contents stable and out of harm's way. This is an example of 7mesh being perhaps a little too uncompromising about design solutions that work for mountain biking, without considering whether they work for life. The cut of early 7mesh Revelation jackets made it impossible to raise your hands above your head with the zipper closed, which TBF rarely happens in mountain biking, unless you are loading your bike on top of a car or performing a fully clicked superman. The people spoke and 7mesh redesigned the Guardian with conventionally placed zippered slash pockets, which are a big improvement in my view. But... the old pockets hold things and keep them dry, and you can pick up last year's Guardian for 375 CAD, which will save you enough to buy a Loam Lever. Or half the sleeve of an Arc'teryx ski jacket..

While the jackets should be identical in performance, I've found the Skypilot is even more effective at keeping me comfortable than the Guardian was. I've since learned my perception has nothing to do with the garments themselves. This year, in the shittiest weather you can imagine, I've been dressing a little on the light side consistently. Unless it's particularly warm or terribly cold, I've only worn a thin merino long sleeve layer (from NF) and a short sleeve lycra jersey under the Skypilot, and I've been shockingly comfortable without knowing why. My under layers have allowed me to keep the Skypilot zipped all the way up and on cooler days I've been cinching the waist as well.

A conversation with Ian Martin, 7mesh's VP of Product Development, got me up to speed. Ian told me that Gore-Tex works optimally when there is a temperature and pressure differential, which means sealing things off improves the way the garment allows vapour to exit. When you open a vent (no vents in this jacket though...) or your front zipper, you cool the perspiration on your skin so you feel more comfortable in the short term, but your jacket won't be able to breathe as well, which Ian explained is the difference between comfort and breathability. The moral of course is to dress so that you can wear your jacket for the entire ride and keep it done up when possible. I've also been riding without a bumbag often (thanks to the storage in the downtube of the Trek Slash I've been riding) and that has improved things further. It's almost like I'm learning something.

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I have no caption for this photo. Something about my nose? The zipper pulls? How about, 'This is not blue, it's eclipse..."

This has been a great season for testing waterproof gear and the Skypilot has had an unblemished record of keeping the downpours out, even on longer rides of several hours or when standing about shooting photos or doing trail maintenance for long periods. Like the Guardian, it's incredibly packable and weighs only 246 grams. The C-Knit backer is nice and soft and there is an even softer suede-like material around the neck

Considering I generally ride more in the winter than the summer, and the weather on the North Shore this winter has been wetter than a penguin's penis, the Skypilot is worth every penny of that 450 CAD to me. In fact it's the best mountain biking jacket I've worn.

More at 7mesh.com

7mesh Skypilot Highlights

  • Material - GORE-TEX® Active 3L, 30d 100% nylon plain weave, C-Knit backer
  • Elasticated cuffs
  • dual elastic waist drawstrings
  • Over helmet hood with drawcords
  • Only 246 grams and highly packable

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Stayin' alive?

7mesh Thunder Pants

Some truly waterproof pants have been on my wish list since I began experiencing the joys of being dry in the taintius maximus while riding in waterproof shorts from various brands, including the 7mesh Revo. The Thunders check some of the boxes you'd want for our clammy clime; Gore-Tex Pro (two types!), long waterproof 2-way side zips, and neoprene gaiters that can be cut to length easily. But that's about it. There is one pocket and waist cinches on each side, and nothing else to report feature-wise.

7mesh was out of size medium when they sent me a test pair so I went up to a large. The length was fine, so I couldn't document the cutting process, but I'm quite certain it would be trouble free. If however, you are fussy yet clumsy, like me, slicing into your 400 CAD Gore-tex trousers might be agonizing. The larges were huge on my 31" waist but the cinches took up the slack relatively well and they fit over pads with lots of room to spare.

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I'm clearly not a size large, and while this looks terrible and ridiculous, as diapers go, I wasn't uncomfortable in the saddle. High wear areas are bolstered by burlier 70 dernier Gore-Tex Pro for even higher durability. Gore claims Gore-Tex Pro is good for 200 hundred high-wear days before any sign of degraded performance.

The first thing I noticed riding in the appropriately-named Thunders, was a lot of noise. It sounded like I was riding wearing a dry paper bag. This has dulled some over time and after a few more washings I'm sure it will get better still, but in the beginning it was annoying. The next moderate nuisance was the clammy feeling of the backer. Compared to the soft C-Knit backer of the Skypilot, the inside of the Thunders is rather unpleasant when a cold morning ride is getting underway. Other points of comparison are the NF Berserker V2 pants or the Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storms, both of which feel like fine Corinthian leather against your skin by comparison, and, unlike the Thunders, have some nice stretch built into the fabric.* But... the NFs aren't waterproof and I've now worn through the ass of one pair of Patagonias and the second pair is looking like it will suffer the same fate soon. The Thunders have no seam down the midline where it meets your saddle, so there are no stitches or adhesives to fail.

*Update - there is now a version of Gore-Tex Pro that has some stretch to it, but it's rumoured to be heavy and compromised in terms of breathability

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At least there is one pocket. But can't we have two for 4 hundo?

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Waterproof zippers make sense for pockets, but I find them annoying generally. They are sticky at the best of times but much worse when they get muddy, and then terrible when the mud dries.

As I was mentioning earlier, 7mesh often goes to the wall making garments that are hyper-specific to mountain and/or road and/or everything between the two. The Thunder pants, as a result, have a very low waist at the front, and no fly opening at all. In the saddle when you are bent over your bars this works great, when you are up and walking around it looks and feels a little goofy and it means the Thunders aren't very compatible with other activities like hiking, coaching soccer, or building trail. Or going to Starbucks. Given the choice, after dropping 400 bucks, I'd prefer to have the option of keeping my legs and posterior dry for other activities without feeling like an alien.

Now that I've got my complaints out of the way... Hang on. Actually I forgot one.

Considering many of us are doing our best to ride pack-less, can we please have at least two zippered pockets? The NFs have four, which is my happy place, and the Patagonias have two, but the Thunders have only one. In the real world pockets are useful. When you are riding pack-less they are essential.

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I don't know what to say about this... Can we have something slick like NF's No Fly Zone or even just a snap and fly like the 7mesh Revo shorts or Patagonia Dirt Roamer Storm Pants?

The good news is that the Thunders are incredibly waterproof and nicely breathable. I think they feel a little less breathable early on in a ride because I generally wear them over bare skin, and that clammy fabric feels a little damp, even when it isn't, before you warm up, but they are very good once you get rolling.


A Note about Pant Design

I think many pant makers are missing an opportunity. Through my experiments I've found that below-the-knee material that is completely waterproof is largely irrelevant. Last year I generally rode in disgusting weather wearing the Revos or some other waterproof shorts with some pants underneath that weren't waterproof, and I was entirely comfortable. Having a less expensive material from the knees down could improve comfort and reduce costs without having much impact on performance at all. Keep the nasty bits and the knees dry and for the rest all that's required is coverage from splashes, which is enough to keep water out of your shoes. /aside


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The neoprene gaiter showing the cutting guides so you can make the length perfect for you. I didn't need to to any chopping.

The long zips are nice, but I don't think they need to be waterproof, although it makes some sense considering how high on the thigh these reach. Waterproof zippers are a pain in the ass to deal with from the saddle and they get even worse when they are covered in mud. The length of the zippers makes it easy to pull up your pads after a long climb or even to put on pads that open completely in the back. You can also reach down and open the zips from the top while in the saddle if you start to heat up excessively.

The wide velcroed neoprene gaiter is a little unruly and tricky to get lined up just so, but it's quite effective as a closure. My tendency is to wrap it firmly but I think it would be more effective if it was easier to wrap it a little looser so there would be more coverage for the foothole of your shoe. So far I haven't been able to nail this.

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This is how they are supposed to look, on a model or mannequin.

You might have gathered that my relationship with 7mesh's Thunder Pants is a little complicated. I really appreciate the thrust behind many of the design considerations, and I'd like them to work for me, but generally they don't. I wish they were a little simpler, more versatile, and had more pockets. The proof of my Luke warm feelings is revealed by what I instinctively want to put on before a ride, and if the weather is cool but not too wet, I reach for the NF Berserkers, if it is wet I reach for the incredibly comfortable Patagonias. If it's absolutely torrential, the Thunders are the best choice, and sometimes I follow that logic. Please realize that the shortcomings I perceive are quite personal, and if you aren't bothered by these elements, or if you appreciate some of these features, I can see your point. These pants are great in many ways, they're just not great for me.

More on 7mesh's Thunder Pants

Also - for all things Gore-Tex, check out this Two Minute Expert

cam@nsmb.com
Cam McRae

Age - 55

Height - 6'/183cm (mostly legs)

Weight - 165lbs/74.5kg

Ape Index - 0.986

Inseam - 34"/86cm

Trail I've been stoked on lately - Fifth Horseman

Bar Width - 760mm

Preferred Reach - 485-500mm (longer with 27.5 wheels than 29)

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Comments

YDiv
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
YDiv  - Jan. 22, 2021, 1:29 a.m.

Sweet review! Definitely interesting to see where the Thunder pants fall short for you.

I find Revo's + any mtb pants on top to work pretty well, though shins sometimes get soaked. Only complaint is I wish there were non-Goretex pants that utilized the rear panels from 7mesh (ie no seam down the middle). That would probably increase lifespan of the seated area quite a bit.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Pete Roggeman
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:05 a.m.

Totally agree. 7mesh has that dialled. And thanks for the kind words!

Reply

FLATCH
+4 hotlapz ManInSteel 4Runner1 jaydubmah
flatch  - Jan. 22, 2021, 4:34 a.m.

Sorry Cam, but at $850 cdn I had to stop reading. It’s riding kit not a new suit.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+4 ManInSteel badgerracer 4Runner1 AJ Barlas
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 10:01 a.m.

No need to apologize. That’s why I warned you straight away.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 23, 2021, 5:47 p.m.

Fair point but depending on who you are, either one is a work suit. Or play suit.

Reply

Kevin26
+1 Pete Roggeman
Kevin26  - Jan. 25, 2021, 1:07 p.m.

Thankfully I wear riding kit a lot more often than my suit.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+8 Mammal Cam McRae 4Runner1 Martin Pete Roggeman Deniz Merdano Poz mrbrett
AJ Barlas  - Jan. 22, 2021, 7:14 a.m.

There are so many good lines in this that I lost track. But more importantly, can we talk about that title image. Haha! Absolute banger, Deniz!

Reply

denomerdano
+5 Cam McRae Martin AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman Poz
Deniz Merdano  - Jan. 22, 2021, 12:23 p.m.

I'm always on the hunt for Cam's good side... I think I found it. :)

Reply

martin
+2 AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman
Martin  - Jan. 23, 2021, 6:08 a.m.

Haha! That title picture is awesome indeed!

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+1 AJ Barlas
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 23, 2021, 5:47 p.m.

'Clammy climes' was one I especially liked.

Reply

WeTYC...
+1 Pete Roggeman
WeTYC...  - Jan. 23, 2021, 11 p.m.

Did anyone else see the title image and wonder if the person with their back to the camera was actually Manservant Hecubus?

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
0
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 25, 2021, 3:53 p.m.

Guilty!

Reply

craw
+2 Mammal Pete Roggeman
Cr4w  - Jan. 22, 2021, 7:58 a.m.

Just how much do you have to spend to get it actually custom fit? I think we've reached that price threshold where absolute fit perfection should be expected. As a hard to fit person I would more than happily spend $850 for the perfect jacket.

Reply

babyzhendo
+2 jaydubmah Pete Roggeman
babyzhendo  - Jan. 22, 2021, 8:26 a.m.

Awesome review! The honesty around the Thunder pants is particularly appreciated. While I'm all for high-end ski and backpacking outerwear, going full 7Mesh on MTB gear is a tough idea for me to get behind. It's not that I don't believe that the Skypilot truly is an incredible jacket, but its more the fact that I generally keep riding a lot of steep and gnarly stuff even in winter (Seattle area), and crashes happen. I've ripped up cheaper rain jackets and such, and the idea of tearing an elbow off of my new 7Mesh jacket is just too emotionally trying.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
0
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:07 a.m.

I'm similar in terms of my riding habits and I hear what you are saying loud and clear. I do appreciate the 7mesh 30 day crash guarantee, and the extended repair window, but it's still tough. Particularly with pants I think because a digger on the knees often rips your pants.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+7 Grif hotlapz Cr4w AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman Dogl0rd Pepe
Jerry Willows  - Jan. 22, 2021, 8:45 a.m.

7Mesh following the Kit & Ace model....  charge exorbitantly more so people can brag to their friends how much they spent.  It will be $1000 with tax to stay dry riding in the rain when you shouldn't be riding anyways.  Cheaper to get a shovel.  /grumpybuilder

Reply

OwenFoster
+3 Cam McRae AJ Barlas Pete Roggeman
OwenFoster  - Jan. 22, 2021, 9:34 a.m.

Cam, you mentioned a pocket.  I've been wearing my Thunderpants for a month and I've yet to find one... am I daft?  I hope so, 1 would be a win!

Thanks for the breakdown, it was very enjoyable read.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 AJ Barlas
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 10:03 a.m.

I had a pre-production pair that had no pockets so maybe that’s what you’ve got?

Otherwise - if there is a zipper like this you may have one?

Reply

shoreboy
0
Shoreboy  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:17 a.m.

How would the Thunder pants work for the commuter option? I ride to work all year round, and need something that is actually waterproof. My current ShowersPass Refuge pants have given up their ability to hold the DWR treatment (after only 3 seasons), and are quickly wetting through. ShowersPass has said that this is common. Pretty disappointing. Before I spend another $300 on those, would $400 on the Thunder pants be a better bet? Do they fit overtop of a pair of pants or jeans?

Thanks for the review!

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 Shoreboy
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:29 a.m.

The fit over pants or jeans will depend a little on your body shape, but even the mediums fit fine over pants for me. I think the Thunders would be excellent for this application - actually staying dry that is. And because they are Gore-Tex Pro they seem very durable.

Reply

shoreboy
+1 Cam McRae
Shoreboy  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:37 a.m.

Thanks for the reply Cam. Id probably be a large given my 33-34" waist, but staying dry is the main goal for the commute. I already have a OG Guardian jacket and it has been fantastic. Ill start looking to see what I can find for the pants.

Reply

Sebov
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
Sebov  - Jan. 22, 2021, 12:21 p.m.

Have them for commuting (blow out deal). Pants are good. Waist fit is awkward when standing upright, while being seated it‘s good. Big down: noise and missing pocketd except from the price (—> sale!)

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
Sanesh Iyer  - Jan. 22, 2021, 1:18 p.m.

A note on value of goretex pro garments:

I have had my Arcteryx Alpha AR for 7 years. Seven. It's a 750 CAD jacket. I wore it at least 100 days a year (hiking, MTB, commuting, Starbucks, skiing, kayaking). Everything. Backpacks. Crashes. It's also in my bag for just in case moments easily another 100 days a year. I also consider it a safety item (dry = warm). That's cents per use and still going. That's value. 

By one that fits. Buy the best one. Keep it forever. 

Thanks for the honest review on the pants. Between these and the NF pants still... One pocket is a flaw. But these would ski well too.

Reply

xy9ine
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
Perry Schebel  - Jan. 22, 2021, 4:27 p.m.

the NF fit & function is SO dialed (the multiple pockets are great); that they're locally made - for $200 - makes me more than happy to endorse these enthusiastically. their lack of waterproofness did have me occasionally side-eyeing the thunder pants (on especially soggy days), but at *that* price point they'd have to be near perfect (and that's evidently not the case). 

would *love* to see an NF with a waterproof ass panel, though. I'm on board w/ cam - a hybrid semi-waterproof design, at a reasonable price point, makes good sense.

Reply

hotlapz
0
hotlapz  - Jan. 23, 2021, 7:41 a.m.

NF makes a quasi waterproof pant:

https://www.ridenf.com/collections/berzerker-v2/products/berzerker-v2-black-grey?variant=32630087090254

I don't work for NF but I will buy their products all day long. I've been wearing DP3 pants all winter so far and Invader shorts all last summer.

Reply

xy9ine
+1 Cam McRae
Perry Schebel  - Jan. 23, 2021, 8:49 a.m.

I'm using those currently. Pretty great in most conditions, just the seat soaks through fairly quickly from tire spray on really wet days.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
-1 hotlapz
Pete Roggeman  - Jan. 23, 2021, 5:54 p.m.

The Berzerkers are fantastic but they're certainly not waterproof - tacking on quasi as a qualifier isn't accurate in my opinion. Water resistant, yes, but whether you're commuting (when only truly waterproof will work on rainy days) or riding in a downpour, your ass and thighs will get wet in them eventually. 

They work for tire spray and light rain but they're a soft shell garment so the DWR can only go so far. 

I still wear them on all but the wettest days though and really appreciate the warmth and the amount of water protection they do provide.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
0
AndrewR  - Jan. 25, 2021, 11:43 a.m.

NF is SO dialled as long as you are not taller than 6' or an inseam longer than 32" other wise the specificity of the panels (which is a good point) means that your knee pads are being pulled up into your patellas and your ankles are still getting wet (or cold). Thankfully Travis has indicated that there is a medium and large long in the offing for Spring!! Gonna be the best riding trousers day ever.

Reply

xy9ine
0
Perry Schebel  - Jan. 28, 2021, 3:45 p.m.

yeah, i could use a bit more length in the leg as well. may have to look them up for some long dp3's come spring...

Reply

Tadpoledancer
+1 Cam McRae
Tadpoledancer  - Jan. 22, 2021, 1:33 p.m.

Thanks for the review of the claps, I’ve been looking at them but was hesitating as 7mesh really seem to struggle to get things right at the first try. 

Regarding the stretch, I think Gore-Tex released a stretchy version last year. Some of that would make sense in these pants I think. https://gearjunkie.com/gore-tex-pro-2020-stretch

I have a Guardian and absolutely love it. The only thing they should change is the silly elastic cuffs. Why not just have some low profile Velcro ones like the Revelation has?

Reply

hbelly13
+1 ManInSteel
Raymond Epstein  - Jan. 22, 2021, 2:04 p.m.

The Thunder Pants name alone would sell me. The price not so much. The most expensive MX pants I could find online are $400. At $650 they better make me be able to ride better than Wade in the sloppiest conditions after burning the meanest sativa available in BC.

Reply

shoreboy
0 Tjaard Breeuwer ChocolateThunder
Shoreboy  - Jan. 22, 2021, 2:49 p.m.

The jacket is $650, the pants are $400.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+1 ChocolateThunder
Cam McRae  - Jan. 22, 2021, 11:32 p.m.

Actually the jacket is $450 and the pants are $400. Canadian that is.

Reply

byron
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman ChocolateThunder
Byron  - Jan. 22, 2021, 6:33 p.m.

Great article, Cam...I've been wearing the Guardian and Revo since they were launched, and just acquired the Thunder pants.  My only comment is regarding the negativity about the cost of riding gear in general (not just in this article, but in comments sections everywhere).  

The bottom line is that you pretty much get what you pay for.  If you want bomber gear, then expect to pay the price. 

Keep up the good work.

Reply

Sanchez321
0
Sanchez321  - Jan. 27, 2021, 1:21 p.m.

I am not sure quality gear has to be high priced. I ride with a pair of roach shorts I have had for close to 20 years. I use them in all conditions and too this day are the best riding shorts I own and have ever owned for durability, and comfort. They cost me around 80 bucks I think, which was less than many of the other shorts i have bought and destroyed in that time. With that said I recently got a pair of 7Mesh shorts and if these live up to the hype of the cost, I will look at maybe getting a jacket.

Reply

Kenny
+2 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman
Kenny  - Jan. 22, 2021, 10:18 p.m.

I got the thunderpants for Christmas and my feelings are the same. 

When it's heinous, wet weather they are like armor, they help me feel like I can face the ride ahead. But that's the only time I wear them. Too heavy and stiff for general riding where it's just a little too chilly for shorts. 

The neoprene cuffs are the best part. Highly recommend against cutting them, they really deflect a ton of crap off of my shoes.

Reply

syncro
+3 jaydubmah Cam McRae Cr4w
Mark  - Jan. 23, 2021, 12:24 a.m.

A pair of lightweight merino leggings under the pants will do wonders for the comfort level to get rid of the clamyness and probably help with moisture dispersion as well. But spending another $75-100 bones after shelling out $400 for extra comfort is probably a hard pill to swallow.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+2 JVP AJ Barlas
Cam McRae  - Jan. 23, 2021, 11:32 a.m.

Indeed and I've done that on cold days. But unless it's really cool I find that solution too hot.

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+3 YDiv Mark Stretch
Cam McRae  - Jan. 23, 2021, 11:36 a.m.

Imagine a pair of wet weather pants that were made with some waterproof and stretching material everywhere except for high wear and high exposure areas with Gore-Tex Pro in those spots. That would be ideal. The problem is I'm sure it would contravene Gore's very strict terms of use. Those would be my ideal solution I think. 

Maybe NF could do something like that?

Reply

YDiv
+1 Cam McRae
YDiv  - Jan. 23, 2021, 3:27 p.m.

Would be interesting to see how the Goretex interacts with stretch materials, since they seem to be on different ends of the spectrum when it comes to fit.

Seems like the unicorn pant will be waterproof, breathable, stretchy, and durable (for both wear and crashing). But at that point, if it's even possible, price will be through the roof.

My ideal Frankenpant would include a 7mesh seat, NF waistband, Goretex, and reinforced material where it's needed (like ripstop, cordura, Kevlar, etc.).

Reply

Stretch
+1 Cam McRae
Stretch  - Jan. 23, 2021, 11:57 p.m.

Tried the Skypilot/thunderpant combo. Jacket is the best thing ever (and a keeper), trousers not so much. While there was no doubt they would do the job there was no way I was handing over that much money for a pair of trousers with a fit like that. Enough room in the arse to store my helmet but then what felt like a women’s specific cut at the front, so weird? Really wanted to love them but just couldn’t bring myself to keep them at that price.

Reply

andrewbikeguide
+2 Pete Roggeman Marcus Jarlson
AndrewR  - Jan. 25, 2021, 11:48 a.m.

And the single pocket (like on their Slab short) is a total 2020 fail. 

One each side please; one pocket for phone (in a case) and one pocket for sunglass pouch/ car key/ emergency bucks/ snack bar/ multi-tool/ hanky. 

Everyone who has had a phone for more than two minutes that if you store anything else in the same pocket as your phone it falls out every time you grab your phone (photos/ Trailforks/ texts/ that work colleague who won't get the hint that you are out riding).

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MarcusJ
0
Marcus Jarlson  - Jan. 28, 2021, 2:11 a.m.

I have both, tried writing a longer post but did not work.

In short, the pants are great, but would be perfect with more pockets (And better sewn seams!) and the jacket has a very big fit, stupid pockets (for cycling) and a hood that only works over a half shell. My Arcteryx Alpha FL is a better cycling jacket in every way, except slightly worse packability and a few grams more, still lightweight though.

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