S2S Trail Action-98
New Release

2024 Santa Cruz Stigmata 4

Photos Dylan Wolsky

It's Crankworx 2023, it's a Sunday, and I'd flatted on my Canadian Open race run earlier. I'm absolutely gutted, and easing the disappointment by practicing for the upcoming Air DH race on what felt like comically small A-Line jumps after the 1199 track. I get a call in the gondola, Caller ID says it's Seb Kemp from Santa Cruz Bikes. Seb goes on to explain that Cooper couldn't make it to this bike ride tomorrow on their new Stigmata 4 gravel bike, and would I like to join instead. "Ahhh, Seb, mate, I've never ridden a gravel bike before, gravel biking is stupid, and LOL, did you say this is a ride from Whistler to Squamish?". On second thought, rides with Seb are always fun, so why not? A quick look through the Air DH schedule, and it's clear this ride should just squeeze in between plate pick up and practice laps. I'm in!

S2S Trail Action-55

Our ride started out in the rain, resulting in fantastic dirt / gravel conditions.

The Stigmata 4 Notes:

  • CC Carbon Frame
  • 700c Wheel Size
  • Small through XXL Frame Sizes
  • Progressive geometry
  • In frame Glovebox storage compartment
  • 50 mm Tire Clearance
  • 40 mm Fork Compatible

Stigmata Frame Details

The idea of gravel biking has expanded in recent years to include everything between dedicated road bikes and cross country mountain bikes. Santa Cruz felt the need for an updated Stigmata that could be used for gravel racing, all-road riding, bike packing, backcountry and free-roading. The updated "progressive" geometry seems inspired by trends in the mountain bike world ( more on that below). The Stigmata comes in a number of different builds, designed to suit each of those styles. Beyond the numbers, Santa Cruz included subtle fender mounting points, and a large internal storage Glovebox that was deep enough to carry a light rain jacket, tools, and snacks.

S2S Trail Action-66

After getting the bikes set up, we head off to the start of the Sea to Sky Trail, and my goodness is it beautiful.

Geometry

The Stigmata is a mountain bikers' gravel bike, and the new Stigmata 4 follows current geometry trends in mountain biking. Santa Cruz has slackened the head angle by 2 degrees from the old Stigmata, lengthened the reach by 30 mm on each size, and focused the geometry around a shorter 70 mm stem. The intent here was to make the Stigmata 4 more capable on rougher situations, while not giving up any of the efficiency and speed of the current Stigmata.

Stigmata Geo

Geo numbers provided by Santa Cruz.

S2S Trail Action-100

The progressive geometry of the Stigmata had me gooning around on all kinds of features on the ride.

Stigmata Builds

The new Stigmata 4 comes in five different builds, intended to span the wide spectrum of gravel biking. Stigmata 4 is available at your local Santa Cruz dealer. You can check out pricing at Santa Cruz or per build as follows:

  • Apex 1x: $3,999 USD / $5,199 CAD
  • Rival AXS 1x: $4,899 USD / $6,399 CAD
  • Rival AXS 2x: $4,999 USD / $6,599 CAD
  • Force AXS 1x RSV: $7,699 USD / $9,999 CAD
  • Force AXS 2x RSV: $6,999 USD / $9,199 CAD
Stigmata Builds

Ride Impressions

We met up in Whistler Village to get the bikes sorted. The bike I'm riding has an AXS dropper post and a suspension fork, which seems like sacrilege to me. To be fair, I hadn't been gravel riding before, but I've always thought forks on what is essentially a road bike is for softies. And a dropper post ... LOL ... why? To make it easier to unclip at stop lights?

S2S Trail Action-181

I liked the 1x drivetrain on the bike I rode. I was impressed with how capable the bike was going up steep sections of road / gravel, yet still able to put down plenty of power at over 50 km/h.

There is a bit of a road ride to get to the first gravel bit. I was immediately comfortable on the Stigmata. I have a Norco Search with 25C slick tires that I use as a commuter bike. My Search is light and fast, and in comparison the Stigmata on it's 45C knobbies felt every bit as snappy and efficient. I thought I'd maybe spin out with the 1x drivetrain, but even on mild downhills I had plenty of gears to eat up the smooth pavement kilometers.

S2S Trail Action-130

Sometimes you have to steer right to go left. A few minutes into the Sea to Sky Trail it became pretty clear that my preconceived notions about gravel biking, as well as forks / dropper posts on gravel bikes, were very wrong. This bike is so much fun!

After a bit of road riding, we started in on the trail. I'm following Seb, a very talented mountain biker, and within minutes he's backing his gravel bike into a rowdy corner. I drop my seat post, foot out, and slide the Stigmata through the same corner. Cackling with laughter Seb and I are back on the pedals, accelerating to the next pristine corner. The Stigmata is a joy to accelerate, and feels almost effortless getting from corner to corner. The Sea to Sky trail would probably be a bit boring on a cross country mountain bike, but given the speed and efficiency of the gravel bike, it turns the trail into a race track, filled with challenging corners.

S2S Trail Action-83

Confirmed; the Stigmata is great for wheelies, and adventuring to gorgeous places.

I was riding the XL size, and I found the cockpit roomy and comfortable. The Stigmata felt surprisingly efficient on the road sections, yet on the rougher gravel sections the combination of the tires, fork and frame were surprisingly compliant and worked well to take the edge off jarring washboard. The seated position seems to strike a good balance between keeping the front end planted on steep, loose climbs vs. being able to weight the front wheel through the corners.

S2S Trail Action-126

Freeride flicks with views!

While I might not have much context on how the Stigmata compares to other gravel bikes, I can say the Stigmata was a ton of fun. It feels like it's intended to be a curly bar bike for mountain bikers. While there are builds without the dropper post and suspension fork, I thought the damping up front was great, and the dropper post was welcome on the fun descents. I'm impressed with how efficient and snappy the Stigmata was on the road sections and fast on the gravel bits, all while being comfortable. My preconceived notions about gravel biking have been left in smoldering pieces; I very much want a Stigmata, with a dropper post, and a suspension fork. It's just such a fun and versatile bike. Also the Sea to Sky Trail is incredible. Maybe I should leave this as my only ever gravel ride, because between the trail and the Stigmata 4, I can't imagine gravel biking gets any better.

Santa Cruz Bikes

Timmigrant
Tim Coleman

Age: 41

Height: 183 cm / 6'

Weight: 87 kg / 192 lbs

Ape Index: 1.055 / +10 cm

Inseam: 81 cm / 32"

Preferred Riding: Gravity Mountain Bike

Bar Width: 800 mm

Preferred Reach: 500 - 520 mm (but this is stack and head angle dependent)

Related Stories

Trending on NSMB

Comments

cooperquinn
+34 Andrew Major Pete Roggeman JT HughJass Cy Whitling Konrad fartymarty Todd Hellinga 93EXCivic Dan Graham Driedger Morgan Heater semiSafe Seb_Kemp NealWood DMVancouver Tim Coleman Velocipedestrian Adrian White OldManBike NewGuy [email protected] Cr4w BarryW trumpstinyhands ClydeRide dhr999 Karin Grubb Hardlylikely Karl Fitzpatrick ohio Dr.Flow Tjaard Breeuwer AlanB

Man Discovers Bicycles are Fun. More, at 11.

Reply

Timmigrant
+4 NewGuy dhr999 ohio Tjaard Breeuwer

To be fair, I wasn't expecting to enjoy riding a gravel bike, or riding a mellow gravel trail to Squamish.

Reply

ClydeRide
+10 SixZeroSixOne Hardlylikely Tim Coleman Geof Harries Karl Fitzpatrick slimchances57 bighonzo Dr.Flow Pete Roggeman Merwinn

Mountain bikers sometimes seen a little salty about gravel bikes. Why is that? I’m a mountain biker, but that doesn’t mean every ride I do is on a mountain bike. Riding is fun, y’all.

Think about gravel as Get Riding And aVoid Ending your Life. It’s a way to roll out of your house and go in almost any direction. Find those low-traffic pavement routes. Hit some singletrack. Back country gravel roads. Multi-use paths when necessary. Go fast when you can. Revel in being able to go almost anywhere. Ride for an hour or ride for eight. Take a sandwich.  But go have fun. 

For years mountain bikers bristled at  roadie snootiness. I don’t think we need to act superior to someone having fun on two wheels just because those wheels are a little skinnier.

Reply

just6979
-4 Bogey Merwinn ClydeRide ogopogo

"Hit some singletrack" On a gravel bike instead of a trail bike? I've tried that. It sucks. Sure I can get to the trails 5% sooner on the graveler if I have to ride a road or path there, but on trail it's 50% slower, if not more, and pickier, and just way less efficient to manage the wrong bike there. It's the opposite of "Go fast when you can". I take my graveler to the post office or general store often enough, and there is singletrack I could divert onto from the rail-path, but it's just not worth it on the gravel-ROAD bike, not enjoyable. 

I think some mountain bikers remember when rigid bikes, literally based on road frames built stronger, were the norm or even the only choice. Gravel bikes effectively existed 40 years ago, and many people, including here, will say that time sucked relative to trail bikes now. To see others going down the same path of basically road bikes with bigger grippier tires, then adding tiny suspension forks, sometimes even mild rear suspension sometimes, and now getting longer and slacker, too; maybe it's disappointing to some that their history is seemingly completely ignored. Like, no shit that a longer & slacker bike with big soft tires handles better on anything not pavement-hard & -smooth, that's why trail bikes evolved from the old rigids to what we have now.

Doesn't help to hear the yammering about how it's the new glorious thing, how you need to experience this thing of riding a terribly uncapable bike on everything from roads to singletrack, for a modicum of more speed when it's very smooth.

Reply

ClydeRide
+4 Tim Coleman Cooper Quinn Merwinn ogopogo

I’ve been riding for 30 years and understand the arc. I’m not pitching gravel bikes as replacements for mountain bikes. They aren’t. But they go a lot of places, and I damn sure don’t want to ride my mountain bike on the road for any length of time.  If you don’t want one, don’t buy one.

Reply

Captain-Snappy
+4 ClydeRide Cam McRae ogopogo bishopsmike

Dear Debbie Downer,

First, don't assume all single track is magically equal, it isn't. Everyone knows this. However, it doesn't appear you do. 

Second, don't like gravel bikes? Don't read the gravel bike articles. Problem solved and your happiness returns.

Regards,

ALL NSMB readers

Reply

xy9ine
+8 fartymarty Dan Seb_Kemp Niels van Kampenhout Tim Coleman kcy4130 dhr999 bighonzo

i haven't touched a curly-barred bike in well over 2 decades, but you've presented this in a surprisingly compelling manner. the geography certainly doesn't hurt, of course.

Reply

Lowcard
+4 Pete Roggeman Andy Eunson bighonzo dhr999

As an owner of a gravel bike, I can assure you that the sea to sky is the absolute worst place to own a gravel bike. However, they are still very versatile and fun. You just have to adjust your mindset - you're not on a mountain bike. If you own a gravel bike, you owe it to yourself to make multiple trips to the interior every summer because the riding there will make you understand how good gravel bikes can be.

Reply

craw
+2 Andrew Major Merwinn

Why is the S2S a bad place to own a gravel bike?

Reply

cooperquinn
+1 Merwinn

I would echo that question, its a great place to own a gravel bike.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 Justin White

I had a cross bike and found the gravel roads in and around Whistler were too rough and loose. Some of the easier trails like Sea to Sky or the easy singletrack around Lost Lake were good, but my hardtail is just as good there and better everywhere else. Now a gravel bike with 650 wheels and real tires in the 2.2 size range and lower gears would be a different thing. But drop bars are for getting aero. Not much use for that around here.

Reply

craw
+3 Tim Coleman OldManBike Bogey

Happily surprised to see a proper sized XXL!

Reply

Timmigrant
+1 Bogey

Right!? I wasn't on the biggest one, and felt perfectly comfortable. Three cheers for big bikes for the tall folks!

Reply

Frorider
+3 Konrad Dan Velocipedestrian

A friend new to biking wanted help finding a commuter bike ‘with a fork’.  I said all bikes have a front fork.  The confusion continued until I realized she thought ‘a fork’ meant a suspension fork.   So your review’s phrasing brought back that amusing memory ;)

Reply

jt
+3 Cam McRae Tim Coleman NewGuy

Haven't seen so many amazing pics in one place in awhile. Damn I miss the PNW.....

Reply

Timmigrant
+1 Pete Roggeman

And there was a plethora of images just as beautiful and amazing from others sections that didn't make it into the article!

Reply

DaveSmith
+3 Cam McRae Pete Roggeman Tim Coleman

Great review and I appreciate your dirty bias. I had a gravel loaner while I was recovering from covid/pneumonia and training my lungs up and really loved it so I've been keeping my eyes peeled - Will add the Stigmata to my shopping list.

Reply

Timmigrant
+2 Dave Smith slimchances57

I had a ton of fun on it, and think it's a great candidate for us mountain bikers dabbling into curly bar bikes.

Reply

Hawkinsdad
+2 Cam McRae BarryW

Damn it, on my list and yet another possible contributor to my Freedom 85 retirement.

Reply

BarryW
0

Freedom 35!

Reply

Fatboy7
+2 Geof Harries slimchances57

I wanted a Stigmata when I was shopping for a gravel bike. But the price, IMO, is wayyy out of line when compared to other bikes with same specs. The Stigmata is a nice bike for sure though! I ended up purchasing The Kona Libre and added carbon Roval wheels with DT hubs and some other carbon bits on the bike. I am a 100% mountain bike rider. UNTIL, I biught my Libre. "Gravel" riding is just like the people said above... adventure, speed, efficiency, long days or short quick ones. With the larger drivetrain (front chainring in a 1x is 48 tooth) I can go wayyyy faster, wayyy further efficiently than any MTB. Not even a questions anymore. I now ride gravel rides once a week.  It has made my MTB riding even better.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 andrewc

That’s a fun ride. I did it a few weeks back on my "gravel bike" which is a Santacruz Chameleon with a 150 36 fork. There are a few parts of that route where a gravel bike is like mixing pancake batter with butter knife. Way too rough. You can do it but it’s the wrong tool. Most of that ride is perfect for a gravel bike though. I may go that way at some point when the hardtail is ready to be put out to pasture.

Reply

Timmigrant
+2 Andy Eunson ClydeRide

There are certainly some rough sections on that trail, and the Stigmata was plenty adequate in those rough sections. The fork, and a dropper post helped a lot here. For the other 98% of that trail, the gravel was absolutely more fun and faster than an XC bike.

Reply

BarryW
+1 Justin White

More fun and faster? 

Really? How much less does a gravel bike weigh than a lightweight XC hardtail? That seems hard to fathom why just by having curly bars and steep geo it would be faster and more fun. Heck, this has a dropper AND suspension fork to boot. 

I guess I'm of the opinion that these are just another evolution of the original mountain bike and don't want to participate in that painful experience again. Lol.

Reply

cooperquinn
+6 ClydeRide Cr4w Hardlylikely Tim Coleman slimchances57 bighonzo

As Tim's journey here shows... perhaps imagining riding a gravel bike, and actually doing it, will lead to different conclusions on the experience.

Reply

BarryW
-2 Justin White ClydeRide Cr4w Cooper Quinn

Fair point Cooper, but remember he said he's always riding huge travel machines, so maybe an XC bike would have given the same surprised result.

Reply

NewGuy
+1 Cam McRae

Always suspected you were a spandex lover in disguise.

Reply

just6979
0 ogopogo Cr4w

The only thing about those "subtle fender mounting points" is that they're only subtle if you never use them. Pretty sure everyone will know exactly where the fender brackets sit on the frame after a few uses and the finish gets marked up all around those points.

Reply

Onawalk
0

Jesus wept.....Theyre subtle for those that dont want to use them, so they dont look quite so much like pimples on a tweens face, for a cleaner look.  If you use em, well the rack/fender will cover that up, and I'd be surprised that anyone wouldnt RideWrap theyre million dollar gravel bike prior to mounting anything to it.

You ok man, you need a hug of some sort?

Reply

just6979
-1 Cr4w

I didn't say they were bad, just that if you use them, and then remove the fenders (fenders aren't permanent, you know), they will be much less subtle.

I didn't even mention that the unused subtlety comes at the cost of any fender-caused wear going directly onto structural frame/fork bits. So there is that, too.

Reply

Onawalk
+2 Tim Coleman ogopogo

What are you talking about?

they arent any less subtle if youve strapped on fenders, and taken them off.  What are you doing to install fenders that causes this?  Thers little grub screws installed into the threaded hole that you would install a fender to.  Little nylon washer on there, and youre good.

re-install grub screw once fender is removed, looks good as the day you bought it.

If youre going to install fenders, why would you remove them?

Reply

just6979
-1 Cr4w

I'll start from the bottom.

It's not always rainy/wet in some parts of the world. I might install them for winter and spring when they're needed almost every day, then remove them for summer & fall when they're only needed once in a while, just to help them last longer and to help me ride the commute a tiny bit faster to get some extra minutes each day with my kids.

Many fenders don't come with little nylon washers, they come with metal ones if any at all, for installation between the fender and frame. Even if they did include plastic washers, clamping anything right up against the frame, especially in conditions you're going to want fenders for, is going to wear on it.

It will definitely not look as good as the day you bought it, even if you loosen off the mounting bolt and wash behind the washer after every ride.

That's all. Yes, they look great and subtle when new and unused. But they won't look as great and subtle after use and the frame's paint is damaged. Arguably worse than a tab with worn paint on a frame with good paint, but I guess that's subjective.

Remember, I'm not saying they don't look good as is. Not even that it's a form over function trade-off, they'll work just fine. Just that utilizing the function will eventually reduce the quality of the form: In other words, they will get uglier and less subtle with use, perhaps more so than a less subtle design. Something to note. That's all.

Reply

Onawalk
+1 Tim Coleman

My Lanta....

Getting extra minutes with your kids based on time savings from a commute cause you removed the fenders is......reaching at best. 

Anyone who installs fenders without using washers on their carbon bike is A. a little silly, B. not concerned with rubbing on the frame, C. just admit you lost the washers that came with the fenders, and youre ham fisted....

Nothing in life that gets used looks as good as new, you're being pedantic.

Taking your fenders off in summer, if youre still going to ride in all conditions has to be one of the silliest things I've heard of, especially in an effort to save time on a commute

just6979
0

Holy shit. All I'm saying is that the subtlety won't last, and arguably will end up worse than a less subtle option. With or without washers. 

"All conditions" in the summer is generally dry, so just like how I take the winter tires off my car in the spring because their appropriate conditions don't exist for a time, I sometimes take the fenders off in the summer. Should I be keeping my snows on all year because summers can't handle "all conditions"?

It's also warmer so being damp on a ride is less of an issue, I don't even wear a rain shell sometimes. Should I keep my thermal shell on all summer along with fenders, just in case of a freak blizzard?

Not sure why you're so upset about the choices I make. 

Again. I didn't say these mounts were bad, just to keep in mind they won't look as subtle after normal usage. So, yes, agreed, everything changes with use, but these will change in a way that may destroy the perceived value of the subtlety.

Any extra time with my kids on a day I don't see them much... that's  worth almost anything to me.

Kelownakona
0 BarryW ClydeRide

Good advert

Reply

cam@nsmb.com
+6 Tim Coleman ClydeRide dhr999 Geof Harries Karl Fitzpatrick slimchances57

Feel free to say more about that if you like. Tim has no motivation to say anything positive about this bike and certainly no instruction from us. His task was to relate his experience on the bike and evaluate its merits and faults truthfully. If you feel there is some indication of bias (and of course we all have biases) towards Santa Cruz in this case we’d be happy to hear what you are referring to and how you came to that conclusion. 

Thanks in advance.

Reply

Couch_Surfer
0

How is the section of the S2S south of Brandywine?  I've done whistler to Brandywine and Whistler up to Pemby on the S2S, but haven't tried the section further south.  You cross over the highway to get it, yeah?

Reply

andrewc
+2 Tim Coleman Couch_Surfer

IMO that was the most "mountain bikey" of the terrain. Definitely a bit steep and chunky for some gravelly bikes. Doable but a lot more fun on an MTB.

Reply

Timmigrant
+2 Couch_Surfer dhr999

There is another section to Chance Creek that was fun. As mentioned already the bit from the Tantalus Lookout area down to Paradise Valley was the roughest, but also had some incredible views, and some fantastic corners / descent in the direction towards Squamish. All were super fun on the Stigmata.

Reply

andy-eunson
+2 Couch_Surfer Tim Coleman

You have to travel the highway to Pinecrest, go though Pinecrest to the end where the trail picks up again. Some rough gravel road and singletrack. Super nice in there. Then you come out on the road to Lucille Lake, hang a left over the river and back up the highway until you’re almost at the top or the canyon. Then wide single track all the way down the canyon. Great views. Nifty mesh bridge that gives some people the willies. Then a wonderfully blocked trail at the railroad tracks. Thanks CN. No wait, fuck you assholes CN. Then eventually you get to the Squamish Valley road. Nasty washboard but that’s about it.

Reply

Couch_Surfer
0

Thanks!  

I need to give that next section a checkout.  The section north to Pemby is pretty spectacular in a couple of spots.

Reply

syncro
0

Seems like a fun bike.

Totally surprised at the choice of the name for this bike.

Reply

mikeferrentino
+3 Hardlylikely Andy Eunson slimchances57

That might be my fault. Once upon a lifetime ago I was the marketing guy at Santa Cruz. We decided to make a cyclocross bike; aluminum, made in the US by Sapa when they were still making bikes before deciding that the margins were just not worth the hassle. A big part of the reasoning behind the original Stigmata was that we were based in Santa Cruz, a ton of us raced 'cross, and 'cross was a big part of the local scene.

The name came about because cyclocross truncates verbally to 'cross, and the discipline itself contains a very evident element of masochism, to say nothing of how so many of us used to get these little scars on our backs and arms from shouldering bikes with Mafac cantilevers all winter. Seemed like a good fit.

We didn't sell very many. No surprise there. Cyclocross is about as fractional a market as dedicated DH.

Reply

syncro
0

Yeah I know the shortened usage of cross and figured that might have something to do with the name, just find it odd that SC would choose to go with that name in this day and age. Not so for for blowback in the bike community but across the public as a whole - especially in some parts of the US.

Reply

cka3686
0

I'm a bit tall and have been trying a 50 cm Curve Walmer bar on my gravel ride/commuter.  I think it helps. Any sense if a wider bar would make a difference?

Reply

rugbyback
0

Hey Tim, great read. See you were riding an XL. We are exactly the same size and wondering after riding it for a bit, you would stick with the XL or maybe drop to an L. No chance to test ride prior to purchase so any insight would be much appreciated.

Reply

just6979
-2 BarryW ClydeRide dhr999 Bogey

"The Sea to Sky trail would probably be a bit boring on a cross country mountain bike, but given the speed and efficiency of the gravel bike, it turns the trail into a race track, filled with challenging corners."

Boooo. If it's boring, you're the boring one. Yes it's fairly tame and not going have many risky parts, but you can challenge yourself on any bike anywhere. A gravel bike isn't really any more "efficient" on trails than a hardtail with fast tires and a firm or locked-out fork, it just has different/more hand positions which can be ideal for long distances. On some of those surfaces, a slightly larger and softer tire than those 45s will actually have less rolling resistance. Plus, probably shouldn't be turning a multi-direction, multi-use trail into your own race-track, anyway.

Reply

FlipFantasia
+4 Justin White Andy Eunson Tim Coleman ogopogo

yup...have ridden S2ST different ways and directions on my Roubaix with 30cc cx tires, and most recently Whistler - Squamish on my 27.5 hardtail with Ikons. Gravel portions are way faster and more fun on the mtb, but noticeably slower once you hit the pavement. regardless, either way is certainly enjoyable in their own rights, and the scenery is great no matter what!

Reply

Ceecee
-3 ClydeRide BarryW Cr4w

A classic opening--bragging profusely about where and who, the disappointment of having to ride from one postcard to another, the tight schedule and mirrored shade, the Sagan impersonation--is the author certain he's not a decorated roadie? I won't complain too much as Resort Municipality isn't on a Shore and 'irreverent' has been largely scrubbed from the site's self-description

Reply

Timmigrant
+8 ClydeRide dhr999 Geof Harries Karl Fitzpatrick slimchances57 ohio Pete Roggeman ogopogo

Juicy comment, thanks for the chuckle. The intent of the opening was to paint a picture that I race downhill and very much a mountain biker. Doing a quick count, I've done three rides this year on bikes with less than 170 mm travel. So the point I was trying to make is that I'm probably the last person Santa Cruz should have asked to go on a gravel ride. Decorated roadie? I can hear the laughter of anyone that knows me with that comment.

Location bragging? I guess, what a gorgeous place. The Sea to Sky is my favourite place to recreate!

And what's the beef with a gravel bike for mountain bikers? It's a bike on dirt that does skids and wheelies and is fun. I think that's on brand for NSMB.com.

Reply

cooperquinn
+8 dhr999 Tim Coleman Geof Harries slimchances57 ohio Kyle Dixon Pete Roggeman ogopogo

"It's a bike on dirt that does skids and wheelies and is fun. "

If that isn't a pretty good summary, I dunno what is.

Reply

Please log in to leave a comment.