DSC00542 deniz merdano rocky mountain instinct 2024
FIRST RIDE & LAUNCH

2024 Rocky Mountain Instinct

Photos Deniz Merdano
Reading time

Intro & First Ride

It's been over 2 years since I rode a Rocky Mountain Instinct. It was mid-pandemic and the bike had some issues I couldn't ride away. The platform, while extremely capable in many ways, felt like a diluted version of the Altitude of the time, not surprising considering the bikes shared front and rear triangles. The shock mounts were what separated the 2 bikes; one was a confidence-inspiring EWS podium bike, the other a lightweight trail scalpel. 2024 sees the most popular trail bike from the company carve a path of its own.

Now sitting at the 140/150mm travel, (there is also a super high end Carbon 99 available that comes with a 160mm Lyrik as well as RockShox Flight Attendant) the Instinct is more adjustable than ever. Rocky retained the Ride-9 shock mount system but simplified it to become the more intuitive Ride-4. The steps in adjustments are bigger between settings but the practical use of the older system had proven problematic. The chainstay length adjustment with the flip chip at the rear axle lives on and provides 5 different effective lengths depending on the Ride-4 setting you are in. Maybe things have not gotten less complicated...

DSC00543 deniz merdano rocky mountain instinct 2024

All new Instinct for 2024.

DSC00577 deniz merdano rocky mountain instinct 2024

The storage compartment is one of the largest I have come across with an excellent latch design. I can get behind this effort!

The user adjustable headset cups provide 3 different settings: -5, zero, and +5mm. While the + and - settings are achieved with the same cup reversed, the zero setting has a separate cup in each bike box. Remember to ask your dealer for these upon purchase. With all the adjustments available for you to mess with, there are 48 possible combinations of geometry settings you can choose from. If there is any bike that can fit an internet-sized spectrum of riders, it is the new Instinct.

Details & Technology

As provided by Rocky Mountain

Travel: 140mm (rear), 150mm (front)

Wheel Size: XS - SM: 27.5”, SM - XL: 29"

  • Refined geometry: We’ve refined the reach, made the seat tube angle steeper, and lengthened the chainstays.
  • Total adjustability: Designed with adjustable frame features to suit all riders and riding styles, this is our most versatile platform.
  • Size-specific tune: Each frame size is tuned for small-bump compliance, mid-stroke support, and end stroke progressiveness. Each frame size also features custom shock tunes based on real world field testing.
  • Reach adjust headset: Fine tune your ride with center, +/- 5mm offset options.

RIDE-4™ adjustment system Allows riders to quickly fine-tune their geometry and suspension with a single Allen key.

Two-position rear axle: Simple chainstay length adjustment. The longer position offers enhanced stability at high speeds and the short position offers increased agility and precision.

Storage included: The new PenaltyBox™ 2.0 downtube storage (carbon models only) includes generous capacity, a custom tool wrap, and our rock-solid hinged door system that doubles down as a water bottle mount and features a built-in concealed AirTag/Tile compartment.

Geometry

Instinct Geo 2023
DSC00555 deniz merdano rocky mountain instinct 2024

+/-5mm adjustable headset. This is in the 0 position, there is a separate set of cups for +/-5mm options.

DSC00551 deniz merdano rocky mountain instinct 2024

Ride-9 from the previous model is now Ride-4 for simplicity.

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First descent, first step down, tons of snow, not a problem for the new bike. Photo: Cam McRae

First Ride

I didn't know what to expect for my first ride on the new Rocky. Would it be like the previous version or completely different? I set the shock to 210 psi for this 160-lb rider and the Fox 36 to 85 psi and hit the climb. The new bike climbs softer than the outgoing model. This could be due to the non-spec Fox Float X2 shock on my tester but the bike bobs and attacks climbs more calmly. The rear wheel tracks the ground well for lots of traction but didn't seem to instigate many out of the saddle efforts. I may have to increase the air pressure slightly in the X2 for more get up and go. The size Large felt surprisingly manageable but in the long run, I'd put the headset reach to -5 if I was to keep the Large. Size medium with a +5 cup could also work well for this 5'9" tester.

The new bike has a significantly more forgiving chassis than the old one as it plows through wheel-fighting roots and rocks with ease. There is less deflection even with the carbon wheels. There didn't seem to be any learning curve to the new bike. It was intuitive and confidence inspiring. The rear end felt a little long on the corners but I'd chalk that up to the half size too big bike I was riding. If there was a Medium Large, it would be perfect, which should be possible with the Medium in a longer setting.

Overall, the experience felt oddly similar to the Canyon Spectral I just reviewed. From the colour to the ride feel, they seem to be cut from the same cloth, even though the Canyon was a size small.

The new Instinct seems very promising on paper and on the trail. The Nanaimo Bar-coloured tester looks great in person and the storage compartment is extremely usable. We are looking forward to more time on the new bike and to bringing you the stories it becomes a part of.

DSC00768 deniz merdano nissan rm instinct

Love a bike that tells you "I got your back". Photo: Cam McRae

Rocky Mountain Instinct Carbon

Rocky Mountain Instinct Alloy

2024 Rocky Mountain Instinct Models & Pricing

Instinct Carbon 99 - 15,499 CAD / 11,599 USD

Instinct Carbon 90 - 12,999 CAD / 9,799 USD

Instinct Carbon 70 - 8,799 CAD / 6,999 USD

Instinct Carbon 50 - 7,299 CAD / 5,799 USD

Instinct Carbon 30 - 5,999 CAD / 4,699 USD

Instinct Alloy 50 - 5,699 CAD / 4,599 USD

Instinct Alloy 30 - 4,199 CAD / 3,399 USD

Instinct Alloy 10 - 3,369 CAD / 2,899 USD

Complete details and spec at Rocky's website, aka the best URL in the biz: bikes.com.

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano

5'8"

162lbs

Playful, lively riding style

Photographer and Story Teller

Lenticular Aesthetician

www.blackbirdworks.ca

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Comments

LoamtoHome
+7 Mammal thaaad Spencer Nelson cxfahrer Jan Tehllama42 Dr.Flow

G2 Brakes with Resin pads on a 10k bike?  ouch.

Reply

Jotegir
+3 finbarr Timer Tehllama42

I actually recall having a conversation with someone from head office visited our shop a few years ago about why resin pads keep appearing on their bikes. 

The reason was apparently because Rocky is a global brand and resin pads just work better in some areas and will appeal to those users (at the apparent detriment to the others)

Years later I have yet to see many of those global users on the world wide web staunchly advocating for resin pads.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+6 finbarr Jotegir Jan Kos Alex_L DadStillRides

Resin (organic) pads work best when it's dry and want more modulation.  The G2's gonna give you lots of modulation due to lack of power.

Reply

kperras
+3 Mark Jotegir Kos Alex_L Jan

Outside of our PNW bubble, organic pads work perfectly well, and same goes for G2 brakes. Sometimes local riders forget that not everywhere has 1000m descents over 2k of trail. 

Horses for courses; If you're shuttling an Instinct up Seymour to ride the Darkside on the regular, you're on the wrong bike.

Reply

LoamtoHome
+2 Jotegir Timer Mark Graham Driedger

I'd still want a more powerful brake on it like Codes.  You don't need bike descents to take advantage of more power imo.  There are also times where you will be taking it on big descents.... not sure of a disadvantage of using Codes vs G2.

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Jerry Willows

Credit where it's due, I do own bigger travel bikes but my Instinct still sees somewhat regular shuttle and sun peaks duty (over the last 5 seasons!) and it's an absolute hoot, you guys built a heck of a 140mm bike.

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Timer
0

It doesn’t take much for G2 brakes on a bike like this to disappoint. Especially with resin pads. Mine got demoted to the XC hardtail for disappointing performance on fairly easy trails by global standards. And I’m both light and not very picky about brakes. The resin pads are astonishingly bad in the wet.

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DaveSmith
+5 DanL Kos Kenneth Perras Alex_L Tehllama42

I like the sneaky AirTag holder. 

If one knew it was there, you could just toss the door but that's a low percentage assumption for a bike thief to pick up on that feature.

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DanL
+1 Dave Smith

It does seem a weird place/lip service to have it, as compared to bonded to the frame somewhere more sneaky inside that hole.

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denomerdano
+3 Dave Smith Timer Alex_L

Sneaky and Airtag are contradictory terms. It allows you to locate things, and allows itself to be located. Hiding it only makes it harder to service. I think it's great to have it on the lid, and noone will know that that's where its attached to because there are no marks to tell you so.

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kperras
+3 Jerry Willows Alex_L DanL

It seems like the use and incorporation in design of Airtags and Tiles have gone up exponentially these past few years. I agree that their usefulness can be controversial, but then I hear stories of people losing luggage or having a bike stolen and successfully tracking down those items. Better to have it and not need it rather than the opposite.

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DanL
0

Absolutely and this is great to see as an inclusion

Reply

syncro
+2 Jotegir Andy Eunson

It would be interesting to ride this back to back with my 2014 Instinct that is running a 150 Lyrik up front and compare the value proposition between the $2200 it's cost me vs the $8k'ish of the Carbon 70.

Would the new bike justify or provide $6k more of fun?

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denomerdano
+1 lennskii

To me it feels like they are totally different bikes.

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syncro
0

Yeah, no doubt that they would feel totally diff as there are fairly significant differences in geo. However, they are both in that trail bike category and I call mine the XC or little bike. What I'm curious about is whether there would be enough of an increase in the fun factor to justify spending  the money to move to the newer bike. Beside the 150mm Lyrik, I'm also running 2.5/2.4 tires, otherwise the rest of the bike is "stock". I say stock as I've swapped out some parts in the name of  maintenance, the main difference is the beefier fork/tires over the stock 2014 999msl.

It's the whole min/max thing that I've been doing since before min/max was a "thing". On paper I'm sure the newer version is better, but I want to know if the amount of better is justified by the price.

Reply

denomerdano
+3 lennskii Kos bishopsmike

Man, only YOU can answer that question. For me, the new bike is better enough that I'd ditch the old bike for an Element. Element is just as capable as the old instinct and the new one is capable as the current Altitude. 

But that's me and the way and the place I ride in.

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craw
+1 Timer

The best value bike is the one you already own. But A LOT  has changed in 10 years.

Reply

syncro
0

@Cr4w Yes and yes. When I've upgraded bikes I have noticed a difference right away - even with certain parts like when I put a -2 angle set on my gen 1 Warden. However, once I'm out riding and having fun those differences tend to fade into the background unless they are really big differences. The easiest example of that are memories of my SX - it rode miles different (worse) than any of my current bikes but I still had fun on it (even though it was a chore at times). The current big difference is going from my old 26" Explosif with a 4" MX Comp fork to one of the newer bikes - it doesn't ride nearly as well - but it's still a ton of fun when I take it out. 

So while I no doubt believe (even without riding it) that this new Instinct is a better riding bike than what I have, is it necessarily funner/better? That was the thinking behind my original comment of doing an A/B comparison - how much does the newer product change our riding? It would be cool to read a review that did something similar. With the feedback/interest in the Buttercups test article, I feel there would be interest in reading an article that does a similar sort of A/B comparison with a new model vs one a few generations older.

tehllama42
0

I'm still actually at a loss for what has really in this case - My 2014 is an XXL, so the net set of drawbacks I'm seeing is that I can only fit a 170mm dropper at my seat height with that absolute yacht mast of a seat tube, and that I'm reliant on a 160mm fork and using the slackest Ride9 setting to hit the 65.9° HTA I really want. 
I'm sure the pedaling dynamics are a touch better since these are kinematically designed around a single chainring, but it's still not going to outperform a multi-link setup I've demoed in that regard, and everywhere else on the spec sheet I'm practically looking at a downgrade for a bike that costs 2x the net value of the truck I go to the trails with to arrive there...

Jotegir
+2 Mark DancingWithMyself

The 2014 is now 4 generations old, and IMO the biggest generation over generation change came in the MY2018. If we're talking right-now dollars, I bet your $2,200 doesn't get you too far from getting on a 2018-2021 ride (or on-sale A30 2023!). I don't think there is a major fun difference between the 2018 and current model, especially with some sensible upgrades to the three generation old bike at this point. 

As someone who owns at least one 2018-2021 instinct, there's nothing in this new generation that has me reaching for my wallet. I did have a chance to ride the generation right before this and it really didn't feel that different than my current bike (with a -2 angleset). Is this one really that much better? I'm curious if it addresses my chief 'room for improvement' area about the Instinct and the Rocky platform as a whole, which is how it handles true high speed repeated square edge hits.

Reply

Onawalk
+6 BarryW lennskii analog7 Sandy James Oates Pete Roggeman ClydeRide

Lets all be honest with ourselves here,  There is no amount of creative accounting that could convince your CPA, or CFO that any new bike is a sound investment, or appropriation of funds.  Absolutely none!

Its an emotional purchase, and to try and legitimize it is a herculean task of mental gymnastics.

Buy a bike, any bike, and ride as fast as you can away from all the non-sense and straight into mental bliss.

This bike looks great to me, and I'm surprised by the geo numbers.  This looks like the best BC "1" bike currently.

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syncro
0

Well, for many people $$$ is a big factor when we're talking about an $8K toy. It's not so much about legitimizing the cost but about even being able to make it work. I agree that this new Rocky looks like it could be a great 1 bike, but if you go a different route that same amount of cash could get- you 2 bikes, maybe a slightly lesser "1" bike and a nice hardtail. I realize my comments don't directly pertain to the review of this new bike, but we seem to be at a point where innovation in terms of how a bike rides has slowed to a crawl - hence my thoughts on comparing this new ride to something much older. 

It all makes me wonder where the industry is headed. If the bikes these days are pretty much dialed and and future improvements are going to be marginal, can the level of growth we've seen continue so that companies are able to sell enough new product to justify their existence? If the new bikes are pretty much perfect, how many people are going to continue to get a new bike every 1-2 years vs holding on for say 5-10 and what does that mean for the bike co's?

Reply

LoamtoHome
+3 dhr999 Pete Roggeman DancingWithMyself

Industry is headed to the e market....  that's where the growth is gonna be.   Tech changes all the time in this facet of the industry so manufacturers will be able to sell to the same user more frequently.

Reply

pete@nsmb.com
+2 Mark DancingWithMyself

Like it or not, Jerry's right, and no one should be surprised. European shops have been reporting for more than half a decade that 50% and more of their performance or high end MTB sales are e-bikes. That trend is spreading elsewhere. And e-bikes represent an area where larger gains can be made as it's an even younger category than mountain bikes (which may be tapering in terms of year to year gains but is still a really young sport).

Mark, I think what you're wrestling with is pretty bang on for most buyers and is a good way of thinking about it if possible. You know as well as I do that emotion creeps in for most people and that governs new bike-itis more than logic.

Obviously no review can answer that question for you or anyone else and I know you're not asking that (nor was this a review) but the A/B of the same model 10 years apart is an interesting idea that merits some consideration.

Reply

tehllama42
+1 bishopsmike

What I'm bummed about is that it's not raining cheap eMTB intended parts for fat idiots like me to bolt onto bikes... people are just buying whole bikes, running them as utterly uncustomized packages, and then either trashing them or leaving them sitting idle as whole units.  I hadn't appreciated how little urge there is to really optimize small parts or anything, as long as you have the brakes and reasonable suspension, a 50lb bike that puts out 500W is going to just do what it does

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Onawalk
0

So, to distill your first paragraph.  You could spend less money, get "less" bike, but buy two of them.  I'll never for the life of me understand this, obviously you can spend less, you could buy the lower end model, you could buy used, all of these options will make you very happy.  Having 2 "lesser" bikes does not equal 1, well rounded bike to me.  Dont get me wrong, a hard tail is a good time, so is a long travel enduro bike. 

but additional storage, maintenance, parts, repais, fiddle friggin, etc, it doesnt add up to a good quality (for me) very capable trail bike.  I say this as the owner of more than 1 bike, so grain of salt and all that.

Its always only been "incremental changes" we just tend to look back in hindsight at bikes tha are 10 years old.  We got here by incremental changes, and we will continue to refine things, and new manufacturing methods, and materials, and additional tech (e-bikes) will make it all just a little better.

We are not at peak bike, things are great, but we thought the same thing when we went through LX 9spd derailleurs monthly as well

Reply

syncro
0

@Onawalk - don't take less bike too literally. There's a range where one lesser bike isn't really a big detriment to your ability to ride yet another lesser bike is. If I can put together a bike that provides me with plenty of fun and is reliable at half or less the price of a brand new model I think that makes a lot of sense. So does having more than one bike. Whether the second bike is a HT, XC or DH bike they give you options that a one bike solution doesn't. They also give you a back-up bike to ride when your main ride might be down for service. The biggest issue in having multiple bikes is probably storage. 

In regards to cost, there are a number of used bikes available right now that come in around 1/2 - 1/3 the cost of the new Instinct. I think it goes without saying that one needs to do their due diligence to make sure they're not buying a clap trap that's going to need a lot of maintence. But if these bikes can perform within the range of expectations and needs for a rider, it would seem to make sense to go the used route. The used route could get you the bike and a 2-3 week riding vacation somewhere if you don't have room to store multiple rides.  

I feel people tend to over value or over rate new things, simply because they are new and they paid a lot for them or their riding buds will give them props. It's an effect of our consumer culture. Either way, I'm happy to ride a previously enjoyed bike at half or less the cost of new because I feel those incremental changes won't make a whiff of difference to fun I have on the trail. If we're comparing bikes from 15 yrs  past to now that's a different story. But even there, you can still run 15 or 20 year old parts that still work well. For example I have a roughly 15yr old x9 derailleur on my DH bike and it more that does the job it needs to. Ten years past is a bit different b/c inexpensive changes (angleset) can make significant differences in the way a bike rides. People are free to spend their money however they want, but I'm more focused on getting as much bang for the buck as possible and have zero need to buy the latest and greatest.

Reply

Onawalk
+1 bishopsmike

Its like having a conversation with a hedge,

Of course you can buy a 3-4 yr old bike for less money, you can buy a year old bike for less money, I have no idea what point youre trying to make?

You can get a brand new instinct for $3k, ride the wheels off it, and continue to upgrade/replace parts as necessary.

Having a $1000 HT, a $1000 DH bike, and a $1000 trail bike is your choice, and its great you find value in that.  A quick look at any sort of buy and sell shows pretty clapped out DH and trail bikes, with outdated standards, geo, and parts in that price range.  Where I'd happily get on a "Carolina Squat" instinct (thats my nickname based on the promo shots of the entry level bike) and ride it all season, in all the places that youd ride your 10 yr old DH and trail bike.  This Instinct, with that geo, and travel range is plenty for 90% of people at 80% of bike park trails.  I rode a V1 Sentinel for 5 years at BC parks, usually passing by most people on their DH bikes.

Youre undervaluing your time time spent, and the parts to fix these things up, and I have much better things to do with my time than re-packing hub bearings, and straightening bent der hangers.....

syncro
-2 Onawalk bishopsmike

@Onawalk 

"Its like having a conversation with a hedge" 

Fuck off you numpty. 

I clearly said 1/2 to 1/3 the cost of new. The instinct in question is listed at $8800 CDN. Half to a third of that is $4400 - $2900, not $1000. I also clearly said something that's not clapped out. I humbly suggest you work on your reading comprehension before you start casting dispersions that are clearly incorrect.

Onawalk
+1 bishopsmike

But its a whole range of bikes, from 3K to upteethk, who cares if you can get something cheaper, obviously you can. You can even get a brand new Instinct .....cheaper!   This is a cool friggin bike, and a great BC 1 bike, in pretty well any spec your budget affords

youre trying real hard to prove a point that is pretty obvious, "an expensive, top end bike is hard to justify"  but thats not your, or anyone elses problem unless of course youre trying to justify it.

Im bewildered by the idea that anyone needs to express that opinion, then go on about how thrifty they can be while still having all the fun.....who cares?

Enjoy your bike, or bikes, or mandolin, or what have you, and leave the people who might want these bikes alone.  Keep in mind, without them, you wouldnt have your 1/2 price used hardtail with creaky bb

syncro
0

@Onawalk - you're still not listening, and making incorrect assumptions. The only thing bewildering here is that you're getting so worked up about someone having a different opinion than yours.

Onawalk
0

You are more than welcome to have a differing opinion, thats the basis for incredible discussion, and learning, and growth.  Its just that your opinion is basically "you can buy a cheaper bike and be happy"  Obvioulsy, NO ONE SAID OTHERWISE.

and your opinion doesnt change that this new Instinct, is friggin cool, and can easily be used as a BC 1 bike.  So youre welcome to your opinion, but it has very little merit other than to make you feel better about yourself, and somehow make you feel superior to other people. 

I'll let you know when I'm done with my bikes, so you can come buy em used

syncro
0

@Onawalk - lol, you've been saying otherwise since my first post, which you should probably re-read so you can see where you went wrong.

Onawalk
0

Nah, went back and read it, its a pointless comment, trying real hard to "up" yourself.

At what point was innovation going lightspeed, that you feel its slowed to a crawl?  Its always been marginal gains, which over time compound and become larger innovations.  Its like that with literally everything.  Its only with the benefit of hindsight that we look back thinking, "my how things have changed"

Youre welcome to have as many old used bikes you want, and Im stoked youre stoked on em.  I'll keep riding what I want, and if theres soemthing outside my budget, well, I'll simply work harder/longer/more efficiently to attain it.  Its really not rocket surgery

syncro
0

lol @ Onawalk, you keep introducing things I didn’t say. 

I do still think it would be interesting to compare my instinct to the new one and see how the two line up. Maybe I’d feel the new ride would be worth it and maybe I wouldn’t, hard to say without comparing them tho

Znarf
0

My wife loves riding (bikes) as much as I do. She‘s rather open to new bike purchases as far as sound investments go. But as bikes have gotten so good in general, the frequency of my purchases seems to have peaked a couple of seasons ago.

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taprider
+2 lennskii Cooper Quinn

Is that $2200 for a new bike? or a used one that needs new pads, rotors, drivetrain, shock rebuilt etc.?

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syncro
0

It's a bit over $2200 incl the new fork I added just a few months ago. The bike was bought 3yrs ago and was in good shape - had a new'sih derailleur/chain/casette, brakes were good, fork serviced, bike has been really well taken care of. The fork (Fox 34) was due for a service but was also creaking a bit, so when that deal came up on the Lyriks I pounced on one. So even at the time I bought it, it represented really good value.

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tehllama42
0

I'm in such similar shape, and I'm still struggling to see the value proposition. It isn't even a challenge for me to just close my eyes and click the top end model, I just don't see much of a need to.

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Znarf
+3 Mark Timer Jotegir taprider DancingWithMyself

Don‘t tell that „old bikes are as much „fun“-thing to the people who make their living reviewing new bikes for people who produce new bikes. :)

But I find you are right, as long as you ride with people on similar capable bikes, you‘ll have fun no matter what. When your regular riding gang upgrades, you might feel the need to so as well. 

The Rocky looks interesting. That downtube is incredibly fat though, when not photographed straight from the side… 

A lot of these new carbon bikes with downtube storage look like emtbs. Wouldn‘t like to have that on my personal ride…

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pete@nsmb.com
+2 Jerry Willows DancingWithMyself

We'll be the first to tell you that a bike you already own that is fun to ride makes you lucky and should make you content to stand pat. We review new bikes for the sake of people who are interested in buying a new bike for whatever reason (ditto components, apparel, etc). It's not for us to tell you when it's time to buy a new bike, or why - that's up to you. Of course we're part of the machine that brings new bikes to market, but let's not pretend that that's any different than the world of cars or vacuum cleaners or anything else. You can't spurn the industry for years and then wonder where the hell it went when it's finally your turn to buy a new bike.

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Znarf
0

To be fair, I was not all that serious :)

I enjoy reading your reviews and the website a lot, even if I am not in the market for a bike. 

And you‘re right, you have a lot of great content not related or even partially opposed to buying new stuff. 

I bet I‘d manage to buy less stuff if I didn‘t visit nsmb or other bike publications for that matter. ;-)

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pete@nsmb.com
0

Very often I'm replying not to the original comment(er) but to other people reading it, so don't worry, I wasn't thinking you were all that serious ;)  Thanks just the same, though.

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taprider
0

I agree about the fat down tubes with meat lockers look like ebikes (I hate that).

I prefer frame bags to in-tube storage bins (much easier and quicker to access and customizable in size to the needs of the ride). As well, uninterrupted frame tubes without the requirement for mid-tube reinforcement are more than likely cheaper to manufacture, stronger and lighter (no need to choose 2 out of 3)

I really like the look of the 2022+ Element with the thin profile tubes (I wonder if they add a bit of flex and comfort?). Hope the 2027? Element keeps with the thin tubes (based on what was done to the instinct I predict the future Element will have the adjustable head tube and chain stays so that riders can choose either XC Race or Light Trail with the same bike)

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tehllama42
0

I'm in literally the same boat... but I'd need to throw lots of money at it to see what the difference is.  Longshock & mullet options to obtain that nimbleness and I'd probably be pretty close, I've already beefed up a lot of the rest, thrown enough carbon parts at it that I'm not even at a weight disadvantage despite running DH tires on wider rims. The 160mm fork I'm already running can't be that different from the latest Lyrik.

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Jotegir
+1 finbarr

I was originally excited because I thought it would be getting the same treatment as the upcoming Altitude which is very exciting for Rocky.... but this is not terribly exciting. I guess that's OK, we're just at that point in bike design maturity I suppose. 

Personally, this bike doesn't offer much that the last one didn't. If I was shopping I'd be looking for an on-sale 2023 model and add an angleset. 

I haven't seen anything on this, but did the new frame gain or lose weight? Can you also check and see what shock size we're running, can you still squeeze a few more MM out back like the last model if you want to have something between the instinct and the altitude?

EDIT: It looks like the bike is now speced with 210x55 shocks on some and 210x52.5 on others. Now the real tinker question, can you go 216x63 like back in the day.... hahahha.

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brewtus
+1 Jotegir

Looks like only the C99 with a 160mm fork has a 210X55 shock, the rest are 210X52.5 paired with a 150mm fork. BC (bring cash!) edition makes a comeback?

2021 Instinct with a -1.5 angleset and +10mm fork length has nearly identical geometry to the 2024.

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Jotegir
0

Fortunately modern Fox shock design means it costs a few bucks in shorter screws to change the Float X from 52.5 to 55, no more faffing about changing IFP depths when doing this short of change.  Likewise, a 160mm air spring for either brand can be found (likely used, so many people swap about) for a reasonable price if you want to 'BC' without bringing too much cash. 

Personally I'd be going the full -2 angleset and then clawing a bit more seat angle back with the ride9.

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kperras
0

A -2 deg. angleset will steepen your STA, among a few other subtle geo changes outside of HTA.

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Jotegir
+1 Jerry Willows

Yes! And you can compound that by running not-the-slackest ride-X position into a modern STA on the older instincts while still ending up with a slacker than stock head angle. I tried both a -1.5 in neutral and slackest and a -2 in various positions on 2019 instinct and when held at 140/140, I ended up preferring the -2 in position 8 for both suspension feel and geometry as a general do it all setup in my neck of the woods. I've long sung praises of Rocky's platform by being the brand with the most usable adjustments - the ability to mix and match ride-X with anglesets was part of the reason (not to mention a number of usable shock strokes), because they could be used together to accomplish more than what pretty much any other brand can. 

As to how much a given -2 angleset will steepen a STA, it's a bit debatable because most of them add height below the head tube compared to a stock press in headset. It varies and I've never care enough to figure out the actual seat tube delta of any given angleset.

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velocipedestrian
0

My Works - 2° is a ZS56 lower, the extra height is above the HT with the EC44 cup. 

I'd like to see a choice, where you could fit an EC56 and ZS44 if you'd rather preserve reach and gain stack, but it's SKU proliferation in a niche market.

MWVFU
+1 Jotegir

My MY2018 with -2 Angleset was an impressively capable bike and I bet this would be a dream for big days

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kos
+1 taprider Kenneth Perras Jotegir

Apologies for skimming and probably missing this comment, but: KUDOS TO ROCKY FOR NO THRU-HS CABLE ROUTING!!!

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vantanclub
0 fed Alex_L

No UDH then?

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denomerdano
+1 Alex_L

UDH compatible in long chainstay setting

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Jotegir
0 Tehllama42 Alex_L

Wait a damn minute, if you get the sixteen thousand dollar AXS equipped model, are you then banned from using your chainstay adjust feature?

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Onawalk
+6 Cooper Quinn lennskii Timer Jotegir Pete Roggeman Alex_L

CS adjust and Transmission do not work together on any bike as of now.

It would require a re-install on the rear der, possible chain length adjust and re-do of the setup procedure, if it was compatible with how the dropouts were manufactured.

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kperras
+12 Cooper Quinn DancingWithMyself cheapondirt Spencer Nelson Merwinn Kos Timer Jotegir Pete Roggeman taprider Alex_L bishopsmike

The main issue is the Transmission RD feature where it rotates back to ward off strikes from hard objects. That rotation and the short position, that allows frame material to hang out in the rotation zone, do not mix. 

We could have left out the 2-position axle feature, but then we would be punishing those that choose to run drivetrains that are not Transmission, of which there are many options.

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DancingWithMyself
+5 Jotegir taprider Velocipedestrian Alex_L Tehllama42

Kudos.  Sucks that UDH and Transmission have largely killed the flip chip.  I'd take a flip chip and old-school NSB-quality hanger any day.

vantanclub
0

Oh yeah, missed the Transmission on the top end. 

Would have been interesting to see CUES matched up with a better fork for the lower end models. 

Rockshox RL forks are a tough sell on a $4,000 bike...

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shutter2ride
0

UDH, but chainstay length adjust might have to be in "long" for it.

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