deniz merdano karin juliana furtado 6
REVIEW

2023 Juliana Furtado MX Long Term Review

Words Karin Grubb
Photos Deniz Merdano, except where noted
Date Nov 30, 2022
Reading time

I had the opportunity to test the new 2022 Juliana Furtado MX this fall and have managed to get in some good long rides, some scary rides, some sufferfests and some pure woot-woots, a nice balance if I do say so myself! After last year's 9 straight months of rain, which deprived the PNW of any of the highly coveted “all time fall time”, mother nature has blessed us with more than an average number of sunny days this fall – a never ending summer it felt like for a while! While the sunshine was nice, the trails, forests, rivers and salmon really suffered from the lack of rain, so I think it’s safe to say we all breathed a collective sigh of relief when the rain finally did arrive. But somehow, the sun came back again with cooler temperatures and tacky dirt and damn if the last few weeks haven’t been the all-time fall-time that we missed last year, and this year’s combined! With the sunshine and good weather unexpectedly still around in November, I headed to Bellingham for the first time since the world changed in 2020 with three other rad women to ride bikes and brought Ms. Furtado along. If you haven’t had the pleasure of riding in Bellingham, it is well worth it. The Whatcom Mtb Bike Coalition does an incredible job with their network, the trails have lots of flow and some awesome jump lines for every skill level, with opportunities for progression galore! Everyone we met on the trails was so friendly. We even ran into Jill Kintner while riding on Galbraith and she took us through the Cedar jumps - I can't think of a warmer welcome!

The Furtado model I tested is the Furtado CC XO1 AXS RSV in size Medium, built out as follows:

  • Fork: Rockshox Pike Ultimate 140mm (29)
  • Shock: Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate
  • Bars: 760mm Santa Cruz 20 Carbon bars
  • Headset: Cane Creek 40 IS Integrated Headset
  • Brakes: SRAM G2 RSC
  • Rotors: Avid Centreline 200mm Front/ 180mm Back
  • Dropper: Reverb Stealth 125mm-200mm
  • Drivetrain: SRAM XO1 AXS Eagle, 12spd (32T front chain ring)
  • Wheels: Santa Cruz Carbon Reserve 30 Rims with Industry Nine 1/1 Hubs (boost) - Mullet!
  • Tires: Maxxis DHR II, Maxxgrip front and Maxxterra rear

I generally start my suspension baselines using the value of my weight in kg in the fork and my weight in lbs in the shock, and fairly neutral in the compression settings. I maintained that approach with the Furtado.

Three days of riding in Bellingham ended up showcasing all the strengths and the few weaknesses of the Furtado. It was also when a few items on the bike started to show some wear. For three months I had had almost no issues, but those that did occur came up at the same time on this trip. You could say I brought the first issue on myself when I looked at the Rockshox reverb vent valve tool on the shelf and thought “Nah, I don’t need to bring that – the seatpost has been flawless!”Somewhere Murphy is listening.

Sure enough on day one, while chasing three fast and fit women, my seat post immediately squished. This was the first day of setting the seat post up too high to compensate for the squish. The alternative was riding like I was on a BMX and burning up my quads. Thankfully we finished our ride at the Transition Outpost and the service techs kindly sorted out the post while we did the only responsible thing and had a beer. Servicing the Reverb Stealth seat post is fairly straightforward except for a few things: 1) you need a special tool, 2) the seat must be removed to access the valve. Having now serviced this post and another Reverb stealth, it seems the post needs to be serviced at least twice. In both cases after the first service it was firm, but then one ride later the post needed another service.

Other than the frustrating seat post issue, the Furtado kept up very well on the trip. We rode a variety of trails, some very steep and fast, lots of fun jump lines and some good tech. Everyone else was riding their full sized enduro bikes and I continue to be impressed by just how capable this short travel bike is.

image0

The Furtado Loves to Corner!

Photo: Sarah Coney

Geo Impressions

The Furtado is a trail bike with 140mm of suspension in the front, 130mm in the back, and MX wheel sizes (aka mullet with 29 front and 27 rear). Before the Furtado arrived I was riding a Scott Ransom, which is a much longer 29er with 170 mm of suspension front and back and which is much longer 29. The Furtado is a short bike with a tight cockpit. As a rider with most of my height in my torso I was concerned about this, but I have grown to absolutely love the compact feel of this bike on descents. Compared to a lot of other bikes that have embraced longer and lower, the Furtado is snappy and compact, but still incredibly stable. After a short adjustment period I found it incredibly easy to get centred on this bike and, once centred, the bike rides very predictably and playfully. That said, because the bike is short, if the rider gets too far off the backseat its quite noticeable and bike really feels like its getting away. There is a good sweet spot on the bike, its easy to find, but also important to maintain for max-fun and control. In part due to the shortness of the bike, active fore-aft rider movement is important in technical climbing or when encountering up an over objects mid-trail. To get over an obstacle I feel like I need to (but can also easily) pick up the back end to get over it.

Where I didn’t love the shortness of the bike as much was on certain climbs. In tight switchbacks I sometimes hit my knee on the shifter and on grindy climbs I wished I was a bit more stretched out. However, the maneuverability on climbs with tight technical sections or power moves is outstanding.

Ride Impressions

I was really impressed with the riding performance of the Furtado. I wasn’t sure what to expect with a shorter travel bike. The last time I rode a bike with 130mm of rear suspension it was for the sole purpose of going fast(er) uphill. Some people have characterized the Furtado, or the Santra Cruz equivalent – the 5010, as a jump or pump track bike. That’s not wrong, but I’d say that’s unfairly pigeonholing the bike. This bike rides as capably as a much bigger bike, but it demands attention and commitment from the rider. Due to the 140 fork, its also physical and can be a bit more fatiguing on the descents than a longer travel bike.

The Furtado is not a bike that wants to be passively ridden... You can do it, but you’d miss out on its best qualities. The Furtado favours an active and physical rider; it wants to be pushed, pumped and picked up on the back end. The bike really responds to being driven and pumped through the feet to maximize the benefit of the bottomless suspension feel. The more actively you ride this bike, the more it will come alive. I had the most fun while riding lower angle pumpy terrain on this bike. The quality of the ride is dramatically better if you can let the bike run and brake less, so trails where I can carry speed and pop off features or pump, but didn’t need to brake aggressively, were all hoots and hollers.

The Furtado is undoubtedly playful and poppy. It wants to jump and feels very light. Jumping is a skill that I’m working on, and I really enjoyed playing on smaller jumps and getting more air-time comfort on this bike, especially where I could really let the bike run and finding little side hits on the trail. The most confidence inspiring element is that the Furtado always felt very stable in landing on small to medium sized jumps. I can’t comment on bigger jumps yet, but maybe someday!

Cornering is also the Furtado’s jam. The bike is easy to lean and very responsive which means you get to keep more speed through and use less brakes – and that means more fun! Its very stable turning and I never once felt like I was about to wash out. The Furtado responds well to pumping though the feet in corners which means you can really play and zip in flowy trails. If you’ve ever dreamed of popping berm to berm, this is the bike!

Where I was less pleased was in terrain that was steep and technical enough that I didn’t feel l could ride into something at trail speed. Because the suspension is short, creeping into features while braking just eats up so much of the suspension that the ride quality feels a bit harsh. I found myself really focusing on brake control further out so I could let the bike go and sit up in its suspension again before the feature. That takes a certain amount of confidence and precision, or holding your breath and hoping. In bigger terrain, it demands that you pick your lines discerningly, there just isn’t the insurance policy that long travel bikes come with and chunky ride outs require a certain amount of strength to make up for this. Riding steep and challenging terrain on the Furtado is definitely possible, it’s just harder on the body and mentally challenging.

Faster chunky terrain was also not the Furtado’s strength unless ridden pretty quick. The bike feels very stable, even at speed, but chunky terrain felt rough unless you could totally lay off the brakes and let the suspension use its full depth. In Bellingham we rode a few lines that were long, chunky and fast but not knowing the trails I needed to keep some things in check: I didn’t love the bike in those situations because the suspension can feel a bit chattery when braking at speed, which is not unexpected for the travel.

deniz merdano karin juliana furtado

The C-Word

The Furtado is a short travel bike but certainly not an XC bike. The short geo of the bike, the mullet wheel set-up, the short travel and reduced anti-squat make a spritely play-full bike with great traction but not an uphill whippet. The Furtado it climbs very well, but not necessarily very fast. Because of the smaller rear wheel, acceleration is easier in tricky terrain. The bike handles incredibly well, can take tight corners and tricky lines and the small wheel makes some power moves more accessible because it takes less energy to get it moving up punchy climbs. The reduced anti-squat means the bike sinks down a bit more than, for example, a typical XC bike. Fortunately this means when it climbs the wheels track the ground very well. The tradeoff is the bike doesn’t stay as high in its travel and a bit more energy is lost to the ground-tracking action of the suspension unless the shock lock-out is on. I enjoyed climbing the Furtado because I could take some tricky terrain a bit slower and the traction was really impressive, but if I wanted to hammer uphill, I felt like my energy didn’t translate as well into pure uphill movement. From my house I have a quick lunch ride, and on a good day, I can get to the top of the climb in about 45 minutes on my 29’r. I found the Furtado was typically about 2 minutes slower with a similar energy output.

Riders who find their main struggles are power moves and technical features but are happy to pedal at a more casual pace will probably love this feel and find it serves them well. I did find that I missed the rolling speed of the 29er on flatter or low angle terrain, but I could offset that somewhat by maintaining speed better in some situations due to how well the Furtado handles, especially in corners.

The Rockshox Super Deluxe shock on the Furtado comes with a lock-out, which is helpful on roads. I did ride single track climb trails a few times with the lock-out on but if a trail is technical or slippery, the traction provided by the open shock outweighs the benefit of the lock-out. I didn’t use the lock-out that much because it is hard to reach with the water bottle placement on the bike. It would be tricky to use on the fly and is more suited as a lockout for longer approach climbs rather than a lockout you may choose to use several times through a ride.

i9 Hubs

Climbing brings us to the second issue I encountered with the Furtado; my burning legs in Bellingham. Just before the trip I noticed that shifting in the easiest gears was a bit off. I assumed it was probably a sign to lube and clean the drivetrain and so I did that and went off on my merry way to the long weekend trip. Second lesson here is that old saying about assumptions is really true.

I hadn’t ridden with two of the other girls on the trip before, Julia and Solenne, but I figured if they were friends with the third, fast-Sarah, they were probably also pretty quick uphill. I didn’t really think too much of it when I felt a bit gassed and my legs burned a bit more than usual while climbing all weekend as a result. Unfortunately that darn lube trick didn’t sort out the shifting completely and it was still a bit grindy in granny gear. When I came home we put the bike in the stand to sort out the shifting and Deniz immediately noticed that my rear wheel was hardly spinning. He looked at me with that “your rode all weekend with your brakes rubbing??” look and proceeded to adjust the brakes. Unfortunately, that didn’t work. So “we” started taking the rear hub apart and found the culprit – an incredibly rough and compacted set of hub bearings which basically seized the hub. That compaction also changed the alignment of the cassette and derailleur just enough that it threw the shifting off. Considering I’ve only had this bike for 3 months, most of which have been dry, this seems like premature wear. Aside from my mild joy at realizing being so tired wasn’t all my fault, the state of this hub was concerning. I have i9 hubs on my personal wheels and after 2 years they are still spinning much smoother than these.

I reached out to Juliana and was told that the rims (Santa Cruz Carbon) are covered by their warranty but the hubs are not. I was provided with a service email for i9, sent off an email, and very quickly received a response from Willy at i9 who requested a few pictures and videos. Through reviewing the images, Willy confirmed that the hub appeared to be suffering from an over preloading of the bearings, which typically occur if one of the parts (axel, bearing spacer etc) is a touch short or has become damaged or "mushroomed" in some way. Willy packed up a replacement axle, freehub bearing spacer and new bearings to swap in and sent them by priority courier free of charge. All told it took two days from my initial email to i9 for parts to be ready to ship and I’m very pleased with their responsiveness and resolution. Manufacturing defects happen from time to time, the important thing is how and how quickly they are resolved.

Why a Juliana?

Juliana is the sister brand to Santa Cruz, and the Furtado is equivalent to a Santa Cruz 5010. The key things that make the Furtado different from the 5010 are:

- Touchpoints: The Furtado comes stock with a women’s specific saddle and Juliana grips. The Furtado medium also comes with 760mm bars whereas the 5010 come with 800mm bars.

- Shock Tune: The Furtado suspension comes with a lighter tune.

- Frame Finish: The Furtado has a Matte Aquamarine colour with bright green decals and the 5010 is glossy bright red or matte nickel.

- Branding: Juliana focusses on supporting women riders and has a great roster of incredible female athletes they are supporting. They also sponsor a lot of events focused on increasing female participation in mountain biking.

The spec differences are minor but I would prefer to see a wider bar stocked on the Medium Furtado’s – 760mm is a little narrow for me. My preference would be to run this bike with 780 bars, which I could do easily if they came with 800's, but I'm guessing that gluing little bits of carbon to the end of the 760s is probably inadvisable. My bike came with a Juliana-branded saddle (ends up not a WTB as previously noted!) with carbon rails. I broke that saddle after 5 rides. The saddle is very comfortable but, in my opinion, carbon rails have no place on a mountain bike saddle unless its for XC racing. Juliana sent me a replacement saddle but this is not a typical warranty procedure.

The lighter tune on the shock is interesting. I had a chance to ride the 5010 and the differences I noticed were subtle. I felt like the shock on the 5010 - set to the same settings as the Furtado - felt a bit firmer on the top end. The shock seemed to activate on the Furtado with less effort, which would help lighter or less aggressive riders access the shock more easily. I didn't notice any other big difference between the rear suspension on the two bikes, but I would guess that the lighter tune on the Furtado also contributes a bit to the more squat and plush feel on the bike while climbing, but the tune on the 5010 may keep heavier riders higher in the travel on the uphills. This lighter tune could have benefits for the lighter weight rider or riders who aren't quite as active on their bike, but likely has little benefit for a rider who weighs closer to a male average weight and who rides aggressively.

The biggest difference between the bikes are the community and branding aspects. There have been several times I’ve been out on the trails and someone has remarked about the bike, or another woman has found some instant kinship if she was also riding a Juliana, and I just love that. When I first got this bike to review someone made a remark about how “girls bikes” aren’t needed and suggested I should reach out to a few well known riders in our area to ask if they “ride like a girl.” I was immediately reminded about how much we need brands like Juliana doing what they do. I hope that all the amazing women riders I know and have the pleasure of riding with do think they ride like a girl – because that’s rad.

Women are riders, good riders, accomplished riders, and for far too long have had to claw and fight for a tiny part of the pie. I don’t think women’s specific bikes are necessarily needed, but I do think brands that build bikes that are capable for smaller riders and who support and lift up women riders as a priority are deeply needed. Most brands have now evolved to have some women in their athlete rosters, but not an equal amount, and never the majority… unless it’s a women’s specific brand. I hope someday that we can look to all the brands out there and see just as many women as the face of the brand as men, but until then we need companies who are specifically putting women first and hopefully changing the old stereotypes that riding like a girl is somehow an insult. A lot of people should be lucky enough to ride like the talented women and girls I know.

deniz merdano karin juliana furtado 6

This smile tells a true story.

Final Impressions

As a rider who lives on the North Shore and enjoys riding more technical trails but still has objectives I’m working my way up to (do we ever stop?), I feel this would be an amazing second bike for me. I can ride a lot of my regular trails, and some more "thrilling" ones, on this bike but felt more fatigued with the shorter suspension. If this was my bike, I would probably put a 150 fork on it just for some extra cush.

If you are seeking to push the boundaries of your riding on technical steep trails or bigger features on very aggressive terrain, I don’t think this is the bike for you, nor is it intended to be. However, if you like to do that once in a while and are good with line choice, the Furtado can certainly rise to the occasion and will make you a better, more deliberate rider in the process. This bike is perfect for someone who loves fast and flowy riding and wants to be active and playful on their bike, or a rider who is improving their riding and wants a bike that will be good to learn new skills or tricks on. I’d happily take the Furtado on a riding trip to Vancouver Island or Sedona, for example, where terrain tends to have more flow and speed than the North Shore. This bike would also be super fun for someone who has more limited time to ride and wants to make their regular rides a bit more interesting and playful. It’s a fun bike to work on little steezy tricks, and begs you to hit all the fun little side-hits out there.

The world is your playground on the Furtado, I will miss her when she’s gone.

Juliana Furtado MX

Furtado CC XO1 AXS RSV MSRP $13949 CDN

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Comments

oldmanbike
OldManBike
2 months, 1 week ago
+12 Andrew Major 4Runner1 DanL Jerry Willows Tremeer023 Dogl0rd Vik Banerjee Kenny Timer mrbrett hardtailhersh BarryW

“I feel this would be an amazing second bike” is a jolting thing to say about a bike that costs $13949 CDN.

Reply

bishopsmike
bishopsmike
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Dogl0rd BarryW

I feel like this bike is 3x more than a decent value.  Please remove the leading "1" from the MSRP.

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Deniz Merdano OldManBike BarryW

It would be an amazing second bike for me, considering where I live and what my personal objective are, but for a lot of people it would be a great primary or only bike.  If was to get a smaller bike like this as a second bike, there are also lots of other models to choose from that come with a lower price tag. This is the top of the line Furtado, and I agree that if it was going into second bike territory, I'd be hard pressed to splurge for top of the line everything.

Reply

mike-wallace
Mike Wallace
2 months, 1 week ago
+7 Deniz Merdano Niels van Kampenhout Cam McRae mnihiser Pete Roggeman OldManBike OneShavedLeg

Great read.   Nice work Karin.

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Thanks Mike!

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+4 Deniz Merdano Karin Grubb gubbinalia Sanesh Iyer

Great review Karin! I would have loved to have read what you thought about the bike with 10mm or even 20mm more fork travel. 

"Because the suspension is short, creeping into features while braking just eats up so much of the suspension that the ride quality feels a bit harsh. I found myself really focusing on brake control further out so I could let the bike go and sit up in its suspension again before the feature."

...

Yes!

"All told it took two days from my initial email to i9 for parts to be ready to ship and I’m very pleased with their responsiveness and resolution. Manufacturing defects happen from time to time, the important thing is how and how quickly they are resolved."

Reply

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Your wish is my command..*proceeds to pull the spare 170mm coil fork out of the storage....

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Deniz Merdano

Do it, do it! 

I wonder if the Reach would feel too short climbing with the over-forked setup? Only one way to find out.

Reply

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

I think sizing up to a large would be the right move with a 160-170f fork.. also slamming the stem.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Sizing up to a large? That would be... Difficult.

Reply

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Not at all.. it's called the 5010.. but yes It would be difficult in the Juliana biosphere

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Karin Grubb

@Deniz, you'd then have to put the whole brand/kinship/community aspect in the garbage though. I think that's something.

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Lu Kz Karin Grubb

@Lu Kz, not to mention that the man-specific SCB models (almost) never look as good colour wise. 

If they made the whole size run in Juliana livery I wonder how many dudes would ride one? I’d certainly choose a large Furtado over a large Solo.

———

Colours aside, as someone who started riding in the ‘90s, I have a much stronger affinity to Juli Furtado’s story than to the skateboard brand or even the bike brand that borrowed from them.

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Andrew Major OneShavedLeg

170/130 MX - does that make it an UltraMullet??

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 gubbinalia Karin Grubb Andy Eunson

A long-travel soft-tail?! Hahaha. Front/rear balance is over-rated.

SoftTailUltraRadMullet AKA STURM.

Reply

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
0

The Vanderhoek!

Reply

kcy4130
kcy4130
2 months, 1 week ago
0

MegaMullet seems apropos as it's a santa cruz... err a juliana.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
-1 mnihiser

MMX - Mega MX. MX is cool.

sanesh-iyer
Sanesh Iyer
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 Cam McRae Karin Grubb Niels van Kampenhout

"Riding steep and challenging terrain on the Furtado is definitely possible, it’s just harder on the body and mentally challenging"

Now that's my definition of a fun bicycle! Great review!

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Sanesh Iyer

Thanks Sanesh!  I definitely had a few of those moments and like to think I came out the other side stronger for it ;)

Reply

toastlover
Elias R.
2 months ago
0

I built my 5010 with a 160mm lyrik. The frame arrived on Friday so I only had time to ride it on saturday and sunday. I went with 160mm because I didn't want a mullet and the additional travel restores the geometry with a 27,5" front wheel. After two rides I absolutely love it and it doesn't feel like I need any more suspension travel.

Reply

TomM
TomM
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 mnihiser Dogl0rd Morgan Heater

I'm very surprised that Santa Cruz didn't just give you a new rear wheel for your 3 month old $14k bicycle.  "Take it up with the hub manufacturer" is pretty lame IMHO.

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
0

They did tell me to reach back out if I didn't have luck with i9, but there was no need since i9 was super responsive.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+4 Cooper Quinn Morgan Heater Lu Kz Karin Grubb

Important to remember maybe that most Santa Cruz riders would have had this issue fixed by their shop. It’s not like a consumer-direct brand washing their hands of a customer.

Reply

shoreboy
Shoreboy
2 months, 1 week ago
0 PowellRiviera bishopsmike

Id like to say i'm surprised that a $14K bike came with budget hubs, but that seems to be the way it goes these days.

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Andrew Major

Pretty far from budget hubs imo. I9 doesn't make anything "budget" in the hub department.  This isn't a 14k bike coming with novatech, bear pawls, brandless, or the (actually quite nice) j-bend bontrager hub.

Reply

shoreboy
Shoreboy
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 PowellRiviera

I guess I should have said 'budget offering'. They are the 'price conscious' hub from i9. At this price point you should be getting top shelf hubs (and dont forget seatpost) in my opinion.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Maybe more ‘that’s the way it went those days.’ 

Other than custom frames, limited production small batch stuff (e.g. Nicolai), and maybe the odd very desirable fresh rig that was already a good value no one is getting asking price right now. 

———

I doubt Trek would make the data available but since their dealers largely use their POS-system they’d be able to say how street price compares to SRP over any period of time. It would be interesting to see the gap this year compared to last.

Reply

LoamtoHome
Jerry Willows
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Ryan Walters

They Hydras are more $ much the actual performance of the wheel is higher with a lower engagement hub.  Suspension works better and rolling resistance is less.  Why it's not spec'd with an AXS post for 14k is almost comical but then again, PON.

Reply

grinder
Grinder
2 months, 1 week ago
+3 Deniz Merdano Karin Grubb Cam McRae

Good review, I appreciated your well written description of the overall ride quality of the Furtado/5010 as this might be the only mass produced short travel MX bikes on the market.    I've set up both my short travel and long travel bikes with mixed wheel sizes for better butt clearance because I am relatively short (170 cm).  On the long travel bike, where the benefits of a smaller rear wheel are theoretically greater, I miss the stability of the full 29er set up.   I actually prefer the mx setup on the short travel bike, it just took the playfulness to a whole other level.  That bike is a 140/130 non-evo Stumpjumper (Specialized very quietly made a proper mullet link available this year) and I sized down to an S2.  I love the maneuverability of the short wheelbase and yet the bike is still slack enough to handle a lot.  Sounds like your experience on the Furtado was similar - thanks for the confirmation bias (hahaha)!

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Andrew Major Grinder

Thank you!  That's cool you had a similar experience!  I really enjoy the playfulness of the mullet and I feel like it amped up the capability of the shorter travel - I agree that its a really different riding experience from a long travel 29er, I enjoyed the contrast (and the complete lack of butt buzzing)!

Reply

mudhoney
mudhoney
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Karin Grubb Deniz Merdano

Great review Karin!

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Deniz Merdano

Thanks Penny!

Reply

Jotegir
Lu Kz
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Karin Grubb

Bar width preference discussions are so great these days, you get everything under the sun. Here's someone asking for 780 bars on a bike that comes with 760. I assume they are shorter than I am and on a smaller sized bike (this is a fair assumption, IMO, because Juliana clearly doesn't want tall women riding their band).

This summer, I switched my DH, Enduro, and trail bikes all to 760. It was eye opening. everything, and I mean everything, got better once I was used to it. There was a bit of compromise in the first couple rides but it's disappeared for pure gain (I am 6' 2" and run XLs, for the record). 

A good friend is like 5' 6" and extremely fast, runs mediums, and I'm pretty sure will be buried holding a bunch of 800mm wide bars in the casket.

At the end of the day I do agree bikes should come with 800s (at least) though. Let the customer choose and curse any shop who doesn't have that discussion when the bike is sold and let's them go out at 800 without mentioning it to a rider that doesn't know better.

Reply

mrkdwrds
mrkdwrds
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Karin Grubb

Perhaps I missed it, but I don't see the reviewer's height anywhere which would be helpful in terms of putting the geometry into context.

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
0

I included those details in the first look but you are right I should have included them again! Thanks for the feedback.  I'm around 5'8, but with more height in my torso than legs, so my reach preferences are generally a little longer.

Reply

manu_moisan
manu_moisan
2 months, 1 week ago
0

So it's a 2023 or 2022? Also 14k .. ouch

Reply

KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
0

This is the recently released model, so it's a 2023 model.  Apologies if I messed up the dates somewhere, I spend way too much typing "2022" in my daily job!

Reply

T0m
T0m
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Good review, nice bike for most of the world, unbelievable price. I also can’t believe the “improved” Reverb requires a proprietary tool to desquish.

Reply

AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 T0m

It doesn't. All you're doing is depressing the valve seat so anyone with a socket set is covered without getting too creative and anyone creative is covered without needing a socket set (though it's just easier if you already own one). 

Here's a photo from Cam's review:

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KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+2 Andrew Major T0m

True, but the proprietary took does work well for its intended purpose. Even if you could use the socket, either one would be hard to come by in a hip-pack ;) The real innovation we need here is a way to remove and reinstall a seat that doesn't require it to be done from scratch every time so a seat set-up can be retained, or a valve that doesn't require the seat to be removed to be accessed.

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AndrewMajor
Andrew Major
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Karin Grubb

The proprietary tool is nicer to use but anytime I can avoid owing another single use implement (even if it’s cheap) I’m all in.

I’m with you on hating the removal and reinstalling of the saddle. It’s too bad the reset function isn’t just activated externally with a 4mm hex like the BikeYoke Revive. Or even activated with use like the BikeYoke Divine or Wolf Tooth Resolve. It’s a great idea but there are much better executions out there.

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bailey100
william bailey
2 months, 1 week ago
+5 Morgan Heater bishopsmike mudhoney Pete Roggeman mrbrett

So, when I had a reverb and a Specialized saddle with the relief cut out, I drilled a hole through the seat mounting plate and tapped it to accept a hex head plug. When the post needed to be purged, I could reach through the seat hole with the t-handle, remove the plug, and then depress the plunger using the same T-handle. 
Should probably patent it lol.

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KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 william bailey

Brilliant!

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andy-eunson
Andy Eunson
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Actually Karin, I would suggest we need seat posts that don’t need this "fix" at all. Fortunately my Reverb is in its 5th or 6th season. I forget. I bled the remote after a week because the shop didn’t do it well and again this year when I finally got around to shortening the hose. The Oneup on my other bike has not needed much other than a simple service a couple times a season. 

My I9 101 rear hub has not been stellar either. The pawls skip maybe once every three or four rides. I’ve serviced the mechanism more than once and I see no damage or problem but it still does it. The Torch hubs on my other bike have been without issue for many seasons. 

My next new full suspension bike will probably be along the lines of this bike you reviewed. Thanks for the review.

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denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
0

The nice thing about the prop. Tool is the shape. It's way easier on the hands while pushing down on it

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KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
+1 Deniz Merdano

Thanks T0m!  Yes, this is the highest end model so if you can forego the reserve wheels it comes down a reasonable amount, but its not a budget bike.  That said, I know a lot of people who swear by Santa Cruz and their service and performance record or buy a bike with the intention to keep it 4-5+ years, so the price may be less of a barrier for them.

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kboss
Kirk Bothwell
2 months, 1 week ago
0

This comment has been removed.

denomerdano
Deniz Merdano
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Thats how most of our bikes are setup on the Shore. Over forking/ over pressurizing just to keep that front end up in it's travel on the steeps. 

I guess Karin could have been more specific with the harshness she felt deeper in the travel, but it's mostly from the fork I'd wager. Considering the sag window on the shock struck 30% o'clock

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KarinG
Karin Grubb
2 months, 1 week ago
0

Depending on circumstances I will sometimes add more to the shock - for example carrying a large pack - but that is my starting point for neutral set-up.  It seems to work well for me here in part because of how short this bike is, I felt like my weight was really well distributed and over top of both the fork and shock, whereas on a longer bike I usually end up with a setup closer to what you've described to allow me to activate the fork better.

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shoreboy
Shoreboy
2 months, 1 week ago
0

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