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Product Review

2021 Fox 36 Fork Reviewed

Words Tim Coleman
Photos Deniz Merdano
Date Jul 31, 2020
Reading time

With the launch of the Fox 38 you can be forgiven for not realizing that an all new Fox 36 was also released for model year 2021. I somehow missed this, and was surprised when I was asked to review the all new Fox 36. "There's a new one?" I gasped. Apparently all new! So what's this new Fox 36 all about then?

Key Features

  • Intended use: Trail / all-mountain / enduro
  • Travel: 150 mm and 160 mm
  • Stanchions: 36 mm
  • Wheel size: 27.5 or 29 inch
  • Rotor Size: 180 mm direct Post Mount, Up to 230 mm compatible
  • Spring: EVOL air spring
  • Damper Options: GRIP2 w/ VVC, GRIP2, FIT4, Live Valve
  • Offset Options: 37 mm, 44 mm, 51 mm
  • Starting Weight: 1,965 grams
  • MSRP: $849 - $1,099 USD
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The 2021 Fox 36 was bolted to a Rocky Mountain Slayer to put it through its paces. A worthy test mule I'm sure you'll agree.

Dampers

For 2021 Fox has added Variable Valve Control or VVC to the GRIP2 damper for both compression and rebound circuits. VVC is a patented technology for the high-speed compression and rebound adjustment. This system improves the performance of the high-speed circuits by adjusting the stiffness of a leaf spring to effectively control the size of the high-speed flow port vs. the traditional shim stack preload. Fox claims that the new VVC systems provides high speed circuit performance that would normally require rebuilding the damper to optimize a preloaded shim stack to your riding style and spring rate. This video gives some good additional info on how and why Fox has implemented VVC. Externally adjustable low-speed compression and rebound, each with 16 clicks. Externally adjustable high-speed compression and rebound, each with 8 clicks.

While the GRIP2 VVC steals the headlines, the new Fox 36 is also available with the excellent GRIP2 damper, the FIT4 and Fox's active Live Valve.

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Those three, small, hard to read, VVC letters on the blue adjuster ring are your clue to the updated GRIP2 damper.

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Familiar external adjustments on the top and bottom.

Updated Air Spring

EVOL increases negative air spring volume, optimizing small bump sensitivity. EVOL’s linear spring curve delivers plushness off the top, extra mid-stroke support, and more tunable bottom-out progression.

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Those iconic Kashima stanctions, with a familiar air spring cap are hiding all the internal changes to the air spring.

Lowers

The new lowers on the new Fox 36 have a number of changes. The Lower Leg Arch is more pronounced, air bleeders are added, and there are integrated oil channels. The 36's more pronounced arch was not a stylistic decision. This is form following function. Fox aimed to shave every possible gram without compromising stiffness or strength. Fox also pushed the arch forward to improve clearance. This was needed with shorter fork offsets, and larger head tubes on modern bikes.

The lower leg bleeders allow for atmospheric pressure equalization at the simple press of a button (on each leg). Pressure build-up in the lower legs dramatically decreases fork performance, preventing full travel from being achieved, and diminishing small bump sensitivity and responsiveness. This feature allows you to easily burp the forks to account for changes in temperature and elevation, or simply pressure build up over time. Pro Tip, don't use the air bleeders when the fork is upside (keep the oil inside), or covered in mud (keep the schmoo outside)

Fox added oil channels to help with the lower leg bleeders. These passages have two other benefits. The lower leg bath oil can easily reach and lubricate the foam rings, oil seals and bushings. This should reduce friction, and improve fork performance and longevity. Secondly the passages significantly increase the air volume in the lowers at full compression. This reduces the air pressure in the lowers at full compression, which reduces unintended pressure ramping.

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I've heard a bit of negative opinions on how the new arch looks. But I think it looks just fine when the fork is mounted to a bike. However I do think the mudguard front lip could have been pulled forward of the arch.

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Plenty of mud clearance inside the mudguard with a girthy 2.4" DH tire mounted up. Front brake hose mounting as previous generations.

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These air bleeders on each leg are used to vent any pressure buildup in the fork. They're also used as a mounting point for the integrated mudguard. The oil channels are hard to see in this shot, but you can see the ribs running up the back of the legs to feed the air bleeders.

Floating Axle

A floating sleeve on one fork leg allows the user to precisely match the fork width to their hub width. This allows perfect chassis alignment, eliminating unwanted friction between the upper and lower fork legs. I recommend reading the manual and following the proper tightening procedure. But if you are unsure of how to operate the floating axle system or simply don’t want to bother with it, the sleeve is preset at the Factory to a nominal setting. Available optionally is the new Kabolt-X bolt-on floating axle that shaves a couple grams, and increases torsional stiffness.

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The pinch bolt at the bottom of the right leg is different to conventional pinch bolts. This pinch bolt allows the fork spacing to exactly match the spacing of your front hub. Once set you don't undo this bolt to remove the front axle.

Integrated Mudguard

I ride in a place where we get a lot of rain. Fenders zip tied to our forks has always seemed like a bodge to me. I like the way Fox has integrated this new mudguard into the fork design. Picking up off the air bleeder locations is smart, and makes for a more rigid mudguard.

Ride Impressions

To get started I used the tuning guide on the Fox website. I used 2 tokens initially, 100 psi air pressure. 6 clicks out for the compression circuits, 4 clicks out of the rebound circuits. And that was pretty much spot on. I changed to 3 tokens in the air spring, and this made the fork ramp up significantly quicker, so I lowered the air pressure to 93 psi. Both settings worked well for me.

One of the first things I noticed with the new Fox 36 is that it rides relatively high in the travel. It provides excellent support under braking and hard cornering. Normally this would result in harsh bump compliance, but that hasn't been the case. I think this is a function of the revised air spring in combination with the updated damper. I can normally get a fork to feel great on a steep trail, or on a flatter high speed trail but not with the same settings. The updated Fox 36 has been a bit more set it and forget it, providing excellent performance everywhere with one setup. Both high speed braking bumps in the bike park and absorbing big impacts overshooting jumps seemed to be handled with ease.

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The Fox 36 provides excellent support in corners and under braking ...

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... providing loads of confidence to lean into corners, and spring out.

The updated VVC Grip2 damper is a noticeable step forward. The VVC is most apparent in the fast rough stuff where the fork seems to open up and transmits very little harshness through to the bars. But I'm going to say this is evolutionary and not revolutionary. The Grip2 is already an excellent damper, with the VVC valving building on that foundation. The other main difference with the VVC version of the GRIP2 is fewer clicks on the external adjusters, but each click makes a much more noticeable difference. I had ample room for change in either direction on all external adjustments. This means the new Fox 36 should be easy to setup for just about anyone using just the external adjustments.

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This berm to berm gap deposits you straight into a sharp left corner putting a lot of strain on the fork. No concerns here.

The mud guard and air bleeders are relatively minor features, but both add to making the new Fox 36 a polished product. I really liked the new mud guard. It was stiff, didn't make any noise, and my fork isn't scratched from using zip ties to hold a cheap fender. I never got a ton of air whooshing out of the air bleeders, but the fork did feel noticeably better when riding on a hotter day than I last rode because I could quickly equalize the pressure in the lower legs.

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Sending it deep! New 36 absorbs bigger impacts with grace.

After chatting with other riders it's clear that I'm not the only one who missed the launch of the new 36 because it was overshadowed by the 38. And that's a shame really. I think the new Fox 36 is a significant step forward for Fox, and for the 36 chassis. All the changes come together to make the new Fox 36 a significant improvement over the last iteration. I can't comment on long term reliability as I've only had the fork for just over a month, but so far the performance has been excellent. Although the 2021 Fox 36 is laterally stiffer than the older 36 fork, I'd still want a bit more lateral stiffness, but that's what the Fox 38 is for. With its mix of weight and performance the 2021 Fox 36 still sits on the top shelf of aggressive forks. Ultimately its hard to find fault with the 2021 Fox 36, and this is a fantastic evolution of what was already an excellent fork.

Trending on NSMB

Comments

Angu58
+2 Endur-Bro Dan
Angu58  - July 30, 2020, 11:06 p.m.

Have you had any issues with it? I have had my 38 for less than two months, less than 800km, and already have a creaky CSU on it. Very tempted to warranty.

Edit July 31: will be getting it warrantied when I get my new shock on. Should be a few weeks.

Reply

Jotegir
+7 Andrew Major AJ Barlas Vik Banerjee Niels Merwinn Angu58 Dan
Lu Kz  - July 31, 2020, 6:16 a.m.

You 100% need to warranty that fork. Creaky CSU could lead to a big problem later.

Reply

Endur-Bro
0
Endur-Bro  - July 31, 2020, 2:25 p.m.

How long is warranty for CSU creaking on FOX?

Reply

Jotegir
0
Lu Kz  - July 31, 2020, 5:58 p.m.

Can't comment on your local turnaround. Right now for us it appears to be around 2 weeks out of the Burnaby center.

Reply

Endur-Bro
+1 Dan
Endur-Bro  - Aug. 1, 2020, 10:54 a.m.

No I meant the warranty period. How long does it last for?

Reply

Vikb
+2 Merwinn goose8
Vik Banerjee  - July 31, 2020, 7:11 a.m.

Wow. Sorry to hear that with a new burly design.

Suspensionwerx wouldn't service our forks with creaky CSUs and if you are out of warranty that's $$$. So unless you are doing full fork servicing at home I'd get that CSU fixed under warranty to save yourself a lot of grief later.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+9 AJ Barlas Vik Banerjee Niels Lu Kz Adrian White Andy Eunson awesterner goose8 Dan
Andrew Major  - July 31, 2020, 7:14 a.m.

Whatever the brand - under warranty or no warranty - please don’t ride a creaking fork.

Again, regardless of the brand, that’s most likely your steerer tube interface creaking. If it’s really creaking (loudly) then there’s a solid possibility that your steerer is moving in the crown. The potential failure mode is the steerer tube turning in the crown / the crown rotating around the steerer tube unexpectedly while riding.

And yes, as an adult it’s your decision. But, if you need a justification to buy a new fork or accept some downtime waiting for a warranty - pretty much any amount of impact-related dental work costs more than any fork on the market AND the potential to f*** yourself up if your wheel moves separately from your controls is epic.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - July 31, 2020, 7:59 a.m.

Immensely frustrating. The last time I had a fork that didn't break was 2010. Do we all just need dual crowns now?

Reply

xy9ine
+6 twk Angu58 AJ Barlas Cooper Quinn Dan Tjaard Breeuwer
Perry Schebel  - July 31, 2020, 8:28 a.m.

chris porter says yes.

Reply

AndrewMajor
+6 Sanesh Iyer Adrian White Reaper Angu58 Andy Eunson awesterner
Andrew Major  - July 31, 2020, 8:31 a.m.

Sanesh, there is a fairly accepted logic that - ridden hard in our locale - all single crown forks will eventually develop creaking pressfit interfaces.

A lot has changed since 2010 that conspires against CSUs. First off, the riding that the average person is doing on a single crown bike these days has progressed massively (speed and ruggedness). Headangles are much, much slacker, and larger wheels have an effect as well. Plus, stiffness has gone up-up-up: carbon wheels, stiffer frames, shorter stems, stiffer bars, etc.

There are two proven ways that some brands have eliminated (or at least very consistently reduced) issues with creaking CSUs at least within a more reasonable time frame. One is adding a tonne of material - more steerer overlap, beefier crowns, thicker stanchions. A couple or a few hundred extra grams in a CSU and even Brett Tippie can get a season out of a fork without creaking (and sell it on with a clear conscience). But at their heart, pretty much all mountain bikers are weight-weenies and suspension brands are all aware of this.

The other way is QC/QA engineering - making certain the interfaces are perfectly toleranced and using products to prevent any future corrosion of interfaces. This will add to a price of a product and with the exception of truly boutique objects (like that EXT ERA fork AJ wrote up) most companies recognize there's a certain price point range they need to hit with their top-end forks. Not that they haven't had other, well documented, issues but Ohlins is an excellent example of a brand that seems to have sorted out creaking single crown CSUs for the most part. I also have communicated with a fair number of riders on the Manitou Mezzer and none of us have had a creaking CSU to date - the fork does have generous stanchion and steerer overlap.

---

TL/DR: There are a lot of different good fork options on the market today both on a budget and at the top end that are less likely to develop creaking than others (or at least are more likely to run creak-free for longer).

----

There's certainly an argument to be made though that instead of the Fox 38 and the Zeb that Fox & Shox could have (should have?) focussed their energies on making lightweight dual crown editions of the 36 and Lyrik.

Both brands probably have a lot of consumer data to back up sticking with single crown forks (for one, DC forks are a lot more expensive to produce) for the Enduro market.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - July 31, 2020, 8:57 a.m.

What are the cost drivers of a DC fork? I always assumed it was mostly due to production volumes being smaller.

It's good to know there are some gems out there. You may have sold me on the Mezzer then. Or maybe I should just spring for a DC fork on my next bike. 

I'm now even more curious about how that press fit interface is sized, manufactured, and assembled.

Reply

rnayel
+4 Sanesh Iyer Lu Kz Andrew Major goose8
RNAYEL  - July 31, 2020, 9:27 a.m.

Oh Andrew, I think that if you started a fork cult, I would subscribe. 

My two forks at the moment are an Ohlins coil and a Mezzer. 0 Creaking.

Mezzers now ship with an air bleed valve, mine is an earlier production model but I have new lowers waiting to be mounted at the next service. 

Sanesh, if you're considering a Mezzer, have a chat with Zac at Smithtech, the Canadian Distributor, (zac@smithtechbike.com), I got mine through him and he was a wealth of knowledge.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - July 31, 2020, 6:46 p.m.

One more vote for Andrew fork club. 

At my current anxiety state I'm going to end up with a 49 on my chromag before the night is up.

AndrewMajor
+2 Sanesh Iyer AJ Barlas
Andrew Major  - July 31, 2020, 10:28 p.m.

In addition to the Ohlins M2 and the Manitou Mezzer, I should have more clearly shouted out the Suntour Durolux (in case anyone missed the Brett Tippie reference).

I've seen forks on their third owner that originated from Tippie, Garrett Buehler, and James Doerfling that are dead silent. In the spirit that everything pressfit will creak eventually, I've seen a Tippie fork that made some noise but I'd call it a quiet "click" compared to a lot of the forks I've seen.

The Durolux comes in multiple price points and even the top-end model is really reasonable. How do they do it? All things being equal (SR Suntour makes lots of other fork chassis) they weigh a bit more. I'd also put them up against any fork on the market for stiffness and they're easy to service. 

I'm testing out the new EQ air spring and I'll have first impressions in soon.

Jotegir
0
Lu Kz  - July 31, 2020, 6:03 p.m.

I just wish we had a company in NA like the lucky folks in the UK who can get CSU's and stanchions replaced. Might make the whole "holy shit dude stop riding your fork right now, I actually like you" conversation a little bit easier.

Reply

Cabana76
0
Adrian White  - July 31, 2020, 6:42 p.m.

MRP offers the kind of replacement service you are wishing for. I have loved every minute riding my Ribbon Coil, which was recommended to me by the folks at SuspensionWerx.  

I am comparing it to a Pike with Luftkappe and older Lyrik.

https://mrpbike.com/pages/factory-service

Reaper
0
Reaper  - July 31, 2020, 10:39 p.m.

MRP Bartlett anyone?!

Reply

MuscogeeMasher
0
MuscogeeMasher  - Aug. 1, 2020, 2:15 p.m.

Would it to be too much of a generalization to say that every new iteration of the 36 that makes everything else stiffer while using the same stanchions\crown and crow\steerer interface exacerbates the creaking issues?

Reply

tehllama42
0
Tehllama42  - Aug. 2, 2020, 6:21 p.m.

It almost feels as though epoxy bedding and a keyed interface would be a practically simpler solution. Being a large oaf who hasn't developed that even with lowly OEM Pike forks that are pushing on 6 years of abuse, I'd be apopletic if that happened on a newer fork.

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+2 Andrew Major goose8
AJ Barlas  - July 31, 2020, 8:04 a.m.

What Andrew said. Angu, please warranty that new fork of yours. The potential health problems aren’t worth holding out.

Reply

Angu58
0
Angu58  - July 31, 2020, 11:20 p.m.

Doing so in a couple of weeks. only easy riding until then, though.

Reply

Angu58
+2 MuscogeeMasher grambo
Angu58  - July 31, 2020, 11:19 p.m.

I have an X2 coming in soon, so will get it warrantied then. I cannot feel any movement, but the noise is pretty constant, no matter what I ride. 

I've gotta say, I am really disappointed in fox. I bought this specifically so I wouldn't have to deal with the creaking and breaking BS from the 36 and lighter forks. Apparently, talking to someone with relations with Fox, is that some 38's have had the eliptical steerer tube cut the wrong way - rotated 90 degrees to the side, and that the skimped on weight for all of them. Supposedly they are already working on a V2 38, to be released quietly soon. I don't understand why they won't just beef these all up. If you want a lighter enduro fork, get a 36.

Reply

martin
+1 Andy Eunson
Martin  - Aug. 3, 2020, 7:01 a.m.

Came right to the comments to read creaky CSU stories. Reading the forums everywhere, apparently FOX still has major problems with this and I don't think this is acceptable from any manufacturer at any price. I'll even take a loss in performance for a silent and reliable CSU as this can be a safety issue.

I've had 3 creaky creaky crowns on 2 Marzocchi 66s from 2012 (my last  bigger bike), and this is something I can't stand.

This will be my 3rd DVO Beryl and I'm crossing my fingers that this one will be fine for more than 30 hrs of use. The first two got warrantied for bushing problems, but they were also starting to creak faintly just before sending them. I've chosen DVO expressly for the fact that they were supposed to have the creaking issue figured out, but it seems like they haven't yet. The CSUs were stamped 2017 and 2018 and I've read in 2019 that they did resolve this so crossing my fingers to receive a more recent one this time.

I'm looking at a Suntour Durolux next as this is the only one I've never read about having creaky CSUs. If my new fork develops another creaky crown when my warranty is over it will be a Durolux for sure.. or maybe even sooner!

Reply

Captain-Snappy
0
Merwinn  - July 31, 2020, 12:09 p.m.

Tempted?! Buddy, save your $ and potentially your teeth and warranty it yesterday.

Reply

awesterner
+5 Reaper Angu58 MuscogeeMasher goose8 Tjaard Breeuwer
awesterner  - July 31, 2020, 1:27 p.m.

Judging by the other comments they haven’t addressed the CSU. I’m on CSU number three on my 2019 36, replaced in feb right before covid shutdown. No more than 20hrs total (including riding to trails from my house), and it creaks. Suspensionwerx wouldn’t even touch my fork with CSU #2 as the crown and steerer were moving independent of each other. And that one was 6 months of use. ‘Warranty’ now for my third will be about 175 bucks, no free lunch after your first replacement from FOX, fyi. 

I still like how it rides, and 175$ per year is cheaper than a new fork. But FFS Fox come on guys!

Reply

AJ_Barlas
+8 Sanesh Iyer DMVancouver Andrew Major Tremeer023 ollyh twk Andy Eunson Tjaard Breeuwer
AJ Barlas  - July 31, 2020, 7:27 p.m.

This is the problem. Andrew is absolutely right in his comment; every single crown will creak eventually if ridden hard on current bikes. But it shouldn’t be happening from 20hrs of riding FFS. As the guys at EXT commented in the article a few days ago, the forces from the wheel peak around the headtube/crown junction. Add in the mass amounts of abuse we’re putting our bikes through and it’s a matter of when not if.

That said, I’m at 10 months on the Öhlins m.2. It’s lived on the front of my G1 for all testing, which is the slackest ‘trail’ bike on the market at 62 degrees. Outside of being my only bike (unless testing something else for a bit), it’s been spending more time in the bike park lately and spent a bunch of time there late last season and it still doesn’t creak. More on that in the final review but I haven’t been so lucky with others.

I’m not sure about the reliance on dual crown now either. The EXT folks made a comment when I was chatting with them that suggested it may not be as we assume. I hope to dig into that some more soon.

Long story short, it’s time some brands put more material in the crown area and stop focusing on the scale so much. Not only will it make a fork last longer, it will help improve the fork performance if this part of the chassis is stronger/stiffer.

Edit: I have to add that I feel terrible hearing you’re having to pay for the “warranty” replacements beyond the first one. I realize this isn’t unusual but I can’t stand by that. If it’s a faulty product, and it goes again, why should the consumer have to pay for the manufacturers mistake!? Brands need to stand by their product and I don’t believe this is doing that.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+1 Marc Fenigstein
Sanesh Iyer  - July 31, 2020, 7:53 p.m.

I'm curious to know what exactly the cause of creak is. So far as I understand, it's corrosion. It's an interference fit between similar metals, so how are things getting in there? Flex? Poor tolerances? Some combination? I'm really interested in what EXT has to say (and to see if their fork performance matches theory).

Forks are probably the 2nd most expensive components on bikes to the frame and a csu with service on its own is probably the 3rd (unless you have carbon wheels or king hubs). On my bike the fork is the most expensive part. Agreed that brands have maybe gone too far.

Edit: it's incredible what a difference "blueprinting" can do for performance. Matching individual parts to optimize limits and fits of the assembly. (I.e. if a pivot bore is on the wide end of the tolerance, mating it to similarly wide links and hardware reduces friction and wear). It sounds like this is what ohlins does, which I imagine is part of their success. Too bad it's so labour intensive. Some companies have automated qa/QC to automate this process as you can widen tolerance windows to reduce scrap rates, often providing net cost savings.

Reply

andy-eunson
+1 AJ Barlas
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 1, 2020, 8:30 a.m.

So true. Paying for warranty is bull crap. We have a thing called the “Sale of Goods Act”. The product has to be suitable for its intended purposes. If the product fails, the party you got it from has to make it right. I was an insurance adjuster, now retired, and years ago I represented a boating store that had sold an outboard motor mount to an individual. Basically a stainless steel slot that attached to the boat where the motor slotted into. A weld failed and the motor fell off and was lost. We had to pay for the motor and new mount because the manufacturer was in the US and the plaintiff had only come after the shop. I think we attempted to have the manufacturer respond but they simply refused. An actual warranty probably changes that so that the store can transfer responsibility to the fork supplier. 

I’m no engineer but it would seem to me that the insertion depth needs to be increased to prevent the steer tube from coming loose and creaking. That EXT fork looks like it does that. I look at that big burly 38 and see a shallow insertion depth. Beef up the entire fork except for the insertion is asking for trouble.

Reply

awesterner
0
awesterner  - Aug. 2, 2020, 4:27 p.m.

I’ve had OG fox 36s, lyriks, and Pikes that have creaked in the past so definitely not foreign territory:). 

Head angle, our terrain, the way we ride, as Andrew stated earlier, has to be the main factor. I work in aerospace and see a variety of metal press fits day in and day out. Corrosion, even on surface finishes we may consider almost perfect, is expected. Sooo, I vote for 1 piece CSU’s please.

On my 36 CSU #3 I’m still troubleshooting the usual, dirt, headset cups, etc....but it’s the usual sound we all know when the cracking starts.  My CSU #1 was warranted under the 1 year time frame. I think #2 was out of the 6month window warranty for the replacement, he see the $fee. #3 I’ve been told when I got the fork serviced with the new crown, that Fox will charge a replacement fee on that if it needs changing. I will say, Andrew and Natalie at SW have been amazing as usual. I remember Natalie equally expressing frustration over this at the time.  It is what it is. Perhaps I’ll look to Ohlins or another variety when the time comes.

Reply

Pnwpedal
+1 Andy Eunson
Pnwpedal  - July 31, 2020, 1:48 p.m.

I'm eagerly awaiting a potential creak on my 2020 170mm 36 (not). It's interesting that the 2021 36 goes up to 160mm, then you're bumped to the 38 if you want any more travel than that. As others mentioned, many bikes nowadays would be better served by a lightweight dual crown - I'm thinking that a modern version of the 2003 Super T would be pretty darn nice, or even a 170/180mm air sprung "Boxxer Enduro" with some weight reduction.

Reply

Jotegir
+1 Pnwpedal
Lu Kz  - July 31, 2020, 6:05 p.m.

You can still drop 170mm air springs in to the 2021 Fox stuff AFAIK.

Reply

Pnwpedal
0
Pnwpedal  - Aug. 3, 2020, 8:45 a.m.

Good to know!

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Reaper
+1 Pnwpedal
Reaper  - July 31, 2020, 10:45 p.m.

Funnily enough I still have a 2003 Marzocchi Super T Pro on my old DH bike. Still buttery smooth, still going strong and no creaking ever.

Reply

Pnwpedal
0
Pnwpedal  - Aug. 3, 2020, 8:48 a.m.

The weight aside, those open bath dual HSCV forks rode so damn well. Considering it's been a good 15 years since I've been on one... How does the old 32mm dual crown chassis feel compared to a modern 35/36mm single crown (Pike/36)?

Reply

andy-eunson
0
Andy Eunson  - Aug. 1, 2020, 8:44 a.m.

Excerpt from Sale Of Goods Act

Implied conditions as to quality or fitness

18 Subject to this and any other Act, there is no implied warranty or condition as to the quality or fitness for any particular purpose of goods supplied under a contract of sale or lease, except as follows:

(a) if the buyer or lessee, expressly or by implication, makes known to the seller or lessor the particular purpose for which the goods are required, so as to show that the buyer or lessee relies on the seller's or lessor's skill or judgment, and the goods are of a description that it is in the course of the seller's or lessor's business to supply, whether the seller or lessor is the manufacturer or not, there is an implied condition that the goods are reasonably fit for that purpose; except that in the case of a contract for the sale or lease of a specified article under its patent or other trade name, there is no implied condition as to its fitness for any particular purpose;

(b) if goods are bought by description from a seller or lessor who deals in goods of that description, whether the seller or lessor is the manufacturer or not, there is an implied condition that the goods are of merchantable quality; but if the buyer or lessee has examined the goods there is no implied condition as regards defects that the examination ought to have revealed;

(c) there is an implied condition that the goods will be durable for a reasonable period of time having regard to the use to which they would normally be put and to all the surrounding circumstances of the sale or lease;

(d) an implied warranty or condition as to quality or fitness for a particular purpose may be annexed by the usage of trade;

(e) an express warranty or condition does not negative a warranty or condition implied by this Act unless inconsistent with it.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
+2 Andy Eunson Tjaard Breeuwer
Sanesh Iyer  - Aug. 1, 2020, 10:36 a.m.

Interesting... 

Unfortunately litigating something like this is probably expensive and hard... And, probably to a fault, I'm not a litigious person.

I know Australia intervened when Samsung used the beach in adds for waterproof phones expressly not rated for salt water. I guess it's all about scale.

Reply

sanesh-iyer
0
Sanesh Iyer  - Aug. 1, 2020, 10:36 a.m.

This comment has been removed.

crashmtb
+3 AJ Barlas Velocipedestrian ollyh
crashmtb  - Aug. 1, 2020, 11:12 a.m.

Whatever happened to 20mm axles?

Will that be the next "revolution", like coil springs? Someone better hurry up and innovate!

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MuscogeeMasher
0
MuscogeeMasher  - Aug. 1, 2020, 2:06 p.m.

Although I have a hard time believing an I9 or similar hub varies enough to truly impact fork performance, all of the other new tech is really compelling.  However, hard to leave an existing 36 that isn't creaking.  Really, really wish they would devote some effort to the CSU.  If I knew the CSU would not creak, would already have a new on order.

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ollyh
+1 Velocipedestrian
ollyh  - Aug. 2, 2020, 10:39 a.m.

With my Hope Pro2 Evo, the hub shell, bearings and spacers all contribute to the precise width of the hub. I can see how any two hubs off the production line could be a slightly different width - especially after a home mechanic has replaced the bearings with a different brand, or switched from a 20mm to a 15mm axle.

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Tremeer023
+4 ollyh MuscogeeMasher awesterner twk
Tremeer023  - Aug. 2, 2020, 9:19 a.m.

This may be a short-sighted question but why aren't one piece steerer/CSU's a thing yet?  Is is purely down to manufacturing costs with each one needing to be specific to each fork or something?  Or is there something obvious I'm missing.  I'd pay a bit more for the reassurance of a one piece.

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ollyh
0
ollyh  - Aug. 2, 2020, 10:34 a.m.

I was under the impression the Ohlins forks have a one piece crown and steerer.

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Shoreloamer
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Greg Bly  - Aug. 3, 2020, 10:05 a.m.

Yes one piece carbon fiber crown steerer tubes are being used. The irony is that to be able to handle the shear loads at the bottom crown , the assembly would be heavier than a press fit Al. Crown steerer.

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gregster77
+1 awesterner
gregster77  - Aug. 2, 2020, 3:19 p.m.

Would be cool to see NSMB team do an interview with fox, discuss future bike suspension direction and see if fox would address the CSU problem here and acknowledge that they’re working on something.     Had mine just serviced, mechanic said it was the worst he had seen.   Got another squeak now and trying to figure out if it’s CSU again or something else.    

I asked in the shop there’s a lot of problems with fox shocks, guy said he wouldn’t want one.  Not sure if lyrics have as much of an issue here as well.

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D_C_
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DMVancouver  - Aug. 2, 2020, 10:54 p.m.

I’d love to see suspension manufacturers taken to task on the creaky CSU issue. It’s ridiculous that this is still a thing. I assume that the economics support accepting a high warranty rate rather than putting more money into addressing the problems.

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gregster77
0
gregster77  - Aug. 2, 2020, 3:19 p.m.

Would be cool to see NSMB team do an interview with fox, discuss future bike suspension direction and see if fox would address the CSU problem here and acknowledge that they’re working on something.     Had mine just serviced, mechanic said it was the worst he had seen.   Got another squeak now and trying to figure out if it’s CSU again or something else.    

I asked in the shop there’s a lot of problems with fox shocks, guy said he wouldn’t want one.  Not sure if lyrics have as much of an issue here as well.

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Shoreloamer
+1 Tjaard Breeuwer
Greg Bly  - Aug. 3, 2020, 9:59 a.m.

Interference fit is common in many areas of manafacturing. If most forks creak than obviously interference fit is not the correct application. The problem is the steer tube flexing from front loading. I wonder if a straight 1.5 steer tube would fix the issue. Remember those?  Or make a one piece carbon fiber crown / steerer which is being used successfully on XC forks. 

Good to see honest observations about the latest generation of forks. 

Glad I'm using a Durolux fork on my mini DH bike. 

The EXT fork that recently  came out , uses an extension on the crown to increase overlap.  

Oh my this is supposed to be about the new and improved Fox 36.  New and improved with a time delayed creaky crown . Nice.

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